Nanowrimo

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Athena, May 27, 2006.

  1. Athena

    Athena New Member

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    I see some of the members like to write stories. Anyone here done nanowrimo? It is a yearly writing contest in which you have to write a novel of at least 50,000 words in 30 days. Starts on the 1st Nov every year.

    In 2003 I completed a romantic crime fiction novel of just over 50,000 words. Not for public consumption though! Every now and again I take it out and read bits. It makes me laugh.

    If anyone is interested in the challenge http://www.nanowrimo.org/
     
  2. D_Humper E Bogart

    D_Humper E Bogart New Member

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    Damn, I dunno where'd I find the time, but that is cool, but I don't know if I have the literary skills. In my "yoof" I loved to write... now I just type instead!
     
  3. Athena

    Athena New Member

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    Check out the website - you don't need literary skill. Here is a little of what they have to say:


    "National Novel Writing Month is a fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to novel writing. Participants begin writing November 1. The goal is to write a 175-page (50,000-word) novel by midnight, November 30.
    Valuing enthusiasm and perseverance over painstaking craft, NaNoWriMo is a novel-writing program for everyone who has thought fleetingly about writing a novel but has been scared away by the time and effort involved.
    Because of the limited writing window, the ONLY thing that matters in NaNoWriMo is output. It's all about quantity, not quality. The kamikaze approach forces you to lower your expectations, take risks, and write on the fly.
    Make no mistake: You will be writing a lot of crap. And that's a good thing. By forcing yourself to write so intensely, you are giving yourself permission to make mistakes. To forgo the endless tweaking and editing and just create. To build without tearing down.
    As you spend November writing, you can draw comfort from the fact that, all around the world, other National Novel Writing Month participants are going through the same joys and sorrows of producing the Great Frantic Novel. Wrimos meet throughout the month to offer encouragement, commiseration, and -- when the thing is done -- the kind of raucous celebrations that tend to frighten animals and small children."
     
  4. Northland

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    I did this once as a lark (and yes, a dare as well). It startled me, the ease with which a full novel could flow from my brain to my fingertips to the keyboard to the paper, even if it wasn't of the highest standard- although it did end up in a Duo (two short novels published as one) with another author.

    Prior to that, I'd seldom timed myself, relying upon the composition of a book in phases and stages. The exception to that was the summer of 2000 when I popped off a 480 page murder spree novel in 41 days. It too was in parts/segments; which, I then had to place in some kind of order which proved laborious. Moving copy in the WP program I had on that computer was slow and at times bothersome as one wrong move would delete copy and I'd have to enter it again (I printed out new copy daily, so, the hard copy was still available- as were the floppys, so it wasn't all that bad).
     
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