National Good News Day!!!

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by marleyisalegend, May 11, 2008.

  1. marleyisalegend

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    Okay, there's famine, drought, religious wars, and all kinds of international madness going on. Once you factor in everyday crimes like rape, theft, credit card fraud, etc.. it becomes a SCARY world. Since it's a beautiful Sunday morning I thought I'd try something different. EVERY time i read a blog about muslims (which I am not) it's about the extremist terrorists with back-packs on their shoulders raping their own women and slaughtering any member of the religion that doesn't agree. When I see a story about black men it's robberies, murders, neglectful single moms and thug rappers. Are white people immune? Hell no, a white politician is more likely to be in the news for being caught with a hooker than for philanthropic efforts.

    Anyhow, what I'm getting at is if you google "white supremacy", "black gangsters" or "muslim terrorists" you're going to get pages upon pages of blood-curling stories. Does this mean there are no color-blind white people, no educated black men, and no peaceful muslims? Certainly not, but CNN and most popular blogs will lead you to believe otherwise. The media tends to take ANY group (sexual-orientation, race, religion, country) and display the worst of them leaded to misguided notions about said groups so here's a different kind of thread. I want everybody to either google really quick, or share a personal or local story about the EXACT OPPOSITE. A muslim peace-activist, a gay men who rescued a child instead of molesting them, a politician who's doing work to support peace-talks, or a woman who overcame adversity to raise her family as opposed to the hookers and nymphos that are often portrayed on tv. Anyway, this obviously isn't going to end hunger, but it may give people an idea that the worst of every group doesn't always represent the whole group, often it doesn't even represent the majority (except in the news). Well PLEASE feel free to read through whatever stories may be shared, you may learn something new, you may feel good after hearing a hero story as opposed to the killers and thugs that we hear about on a daily basis.

    *PS I made the holiday up but that's a minor insignificance. If anybody posts before me, I'm looking for some really good ones so I'll be participating as well in just a moment.

    PSS* if the story is 19 pages long, you can just post the link and write a brief summary of the story and/or include how it contradicts the constant portrayal of said group.
     
  2. D_Cyprius Slapwilly

    D_Cyprius Slapwilly New Member

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  3. marleyisalegend

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    what i forgot is to PLEASE make the story about someone at the opposite end of the spectrum. if you're a woman, post a good story about a man. if you're muslim, post a good story about a christian, if you're anti-war, post a good story about a soldier, etc... the idea is to shed a more shining light on differences. i'm black so my story WON'T be about a black leader, etc...
     
  4. marleyisalegend

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    Summation,

    Tawfik Hamid, a former member of an Al Qaeda affiliated organization brings his message of peace to Houghton College on Monday, Oct. 23.
    As a teen he was selected to debate and criticize Christians. To "understand the enemy", he began reading the bible but developed a growing discomfort with extremist Muslim practices. He eventually began preaching about a peaceful understanding of Islam that is compatible with human rights.

    QUOTE:

    “After the barbaric terrorist attacks done by the hands of my fellow Muslims everywhere on this globe, and after the too many violent acts by Islamists in many parts of the world, I feel responsible as a Muslim and as a human being, to speak out and tell the truth to protect the world and Muslims as well from a coming catastrophe and war of civilizations,” says Hamid on his web site.

    http://www.houghton.edu/news/articles/20061017.asp


    YouTube - Ex-Terrorist 1
     
  5. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    Along the lines of one of your thoughts, the following article from the Wall Street Journal highlights the natural tendency for people to try to get along with each other, but fail to do so, owing to manipulation of religion, ideology, nationalism, etc., by leaders (in this case, Saddam Hussein) seeking their own agendas, and the natural result when the influence of that manipulation was gone.




    May 6, 2008, 2:24 pm
    One Muslim Gets to Know Judaism Amid His Own Exodus From Iraq


    By Sarmad Ali
    A few weeks ago, I flew to Michigan to join my close friend’s family in celebrating the Jewish holiday of Passover. It was my second time going to a Seder and it again stirred memories of how Jews were regarded in Iraq in my childhood.
    The first night we had a fairly big table with a dozen people or more. My friend’s grandfather sat at the head of the table and led the readings, asking others, including me, to recite some passages from a Passover booklet. When a reference to the Euphrates River came up, I leaned over to point it out to my friend. “These are my people,” I whispered, chuckling. The reading was punctuated with jokes and questions as we went around the table telling the story of how the Jews were slaves and then left Egypt. I found that part interesting.



    In Islam, it’s very unlikely for people to joke during religious ceremonies and readings. It’s considered inappropriate and forbidden. When I first came to the U.S., I heard many people, some even observant, making jokes about religious figures like Moses and Jesus. I found it at the time very inappropriate and offensive, and I remember asking them how they could speak so lightly of these “guys,” whom we Muslims revere and refer to as prophets of Allah. I remember how surprised my Jewish and Christian friends were to find out that there are whole suras, or chapters of verses in the Quran, devoted and, in some cases, named after, Mary, Joseph, Jonah, Noah, Moses and David, among others.
    Before coming to New York in the summer of 2004, I had never heard of any Jewish holidays, nor had I met any Jewish people. By the time I was born, there were no Jews left in sight in Baghdad. The handful of elderly Iraqi Jews who surfaced in Baghdad after the U.S. invasion, whose stories were reported in Western media, seem to have survived in Iraq all those years either by hiding their identity or by being just too old or secular for Saddam’s government to worry about.
    The only mental images of Jews that I could think of growing up in Baghdad came from Egyptian movies; for example, about an Egyptian-trained intelligence agent who infiltrated Israel during former Egyptian president Jamal Abdel Al-Nasser’s era, or a television series that showed a synagogue with black-clad rabbis that depicted prophet Mohammed’s era in the Arab peninsula surrounded by Jews hatching conspiracies against Islam.
    When I was in college in Baghdad, my concept of Jews narrowed to Israeli soldiers carrying machine guns as shown on Iraqi news channels. During the Palestinian intifada or uprising, the Iraqi channels showed footage of Israelis killing Arabs and destroying Arab villages. Some of the footage accompanied patriotic songs about liberating Jerusalem. The Jews were portrayed as vicious people who were behind every war and catastrophe in the Middle East. Even the word yehudi, which in Iraqi dialect means a Jew, came to most frequently describe a mean and vicious person.
    In the old part of Baghdad, where I spent 25 years, my grandparents sometimes talked about how in the old times in Iraq Jews and Muslims like themselves co-existed. By “old times” they meant way before the Baath Party took power in Iraq and before the Jews were forced to leave.



    My grandfather was especially nostalgic about those old days, when people from different religious backgrounds co-existed peacefully in Iraq. He used to tell me stories about how the store around the corner from my house used to be owned by Jews or how that neighborhood’s houses with heavy old wooden doors and basements were inhabited by Jewish families before they were expelled from Iraq in the 1950s and 1960s. In fact, my grandfather, who died in the mid-1990s, always referred to some neighborhoods by their old names, the ones he grew up with during the British mandate. Those names were less familiar to me and my generation. For instance, he used to say that, “so and so happened today in the Christian Quarter,” or he would ask me to go buy him cigarettes “from the Jewish Quarter.” I had no context for those names and had to ask him where they were in relation to other things.
    In Saddam’s Iraq, where I grew up and spent most of my life, even whispering words such as “Jew” or “Israel,” if not used in a derogatory way, could get a person in trouble. In fact, the only times people pronounced words such as “Jew,” “Jewish” or “Zionist” were in a demeaning sense.
    When people, especially ones versed in religious texts, meet me here and know I’m from Iraq, they start asking me questions about my country. Aside from war and family-related questions, they ask about the place where I grew up and the old cities and towns in Iraq that they have read about in their Bibles or Torahs. I find their curiosity fascinating.
    A Jewish friend once asked me if I had been to Babylon and Ur. “Dude, it’s amazing you are sitting here with me and you’ve been to these places I grew up reading about in books,” she would say. And my close friend’s Presbyterian grandparents in California, whom I consider my surrogate family, never seem to tire of asking me about the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers and the gardens of Eden that they read about in the Bible.
    As I sat in Michigan I found myself wondering if one day I would be able to spend a Seder with an Iraqi Jewish family, to see what they say around their table and how their ceremony might be different. Would they do it in Iraqi Arabic, Hebrew or English? Would they serve homemade Iraqi meals or desserts?
    I was told that Seders frequently end with the words “next year in Jerusalem.” This year I was in Michigan, last year in New York and a few years ago I was in Baghdad. It’s hard to know where I’ll be next year, but wherever I wind up, I’m still glad to have had these experiences.
     
  6. marleyisalegend

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    Quote from EX-terrorist on Bill O'Reilly

    "Can I go to Ramallah, stand in a street corner and have a pamphlet that says suicide-bombing is wrong? I will be executed withint seconds."

    O'Reilly: You're now an outcast right? You fear for your life right? Because you've turned and you're denouncing terrorism, so they (Muslim Extremists) wanna kill you? You're not afraid?"

    Ex-terrorist: It's Worth It.

    THIS MAN IS WILLING TO DIE IN THE NAME OF ANTI-TERRORISM



    PS thankyou nick, that article was very informative.
     
  7. transformer_99

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    Mine covers everyone, the world celebrates Mother's Day regardless of race, creed or color.
     
  8. marleyisalegend

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    good point. we all have or have had mothers don't we??
     
  9. marleyisalegend

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