need some translation help from the Brits on here

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by mellisa1983, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. mellisa1983

    mellisa1983 New Member

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    I'm reading a book that has some British slang that I just cannot understand, and I am hoping someone here can help explain it!!LOL

    Here's the first line: Ah brilliant! been havin' a butcher's for your flat all day mate, thought I'd cocked summat up! I'm well nackered, I could do with a bevy and a kip!

    The second line: Plus some bloke diddled me brolly in the queue for the khazi back in Blighty...

    The third line: I'm about to throw a wobbly and that! Cheers mate, i'm chuffed as well, cor, your china plate is a bit gormy yeah?, any chance of a nosh up?.


    I'm commpletely lost here???
     
  2. Pompeynate

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    First line:
    Ah brilliant! Been looking for your flat all day mate, thought I'd messed something up! I'm really tired, I could do with a drink & a sleep!

    Second line:
    Plus some guy stole my umbrella in the queue for the toilet back in the UK...

    Third line:
    I'm about to get really angry! Cheers mate, I'm pleased as well, wow, your friend is nice, any chance of a blow job?

    :biggrin1:
     
  3. D_Relentless Original

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    Mitchy and Joll maybe able to correct if I am wrong, sounds like its Cockney slang to me.:smile:
     
  4. nudeyorker

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    Hope that helps a little.
     
    #4 nudeyorker, Dec 20, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010
  5. D_Relentless Original

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    I think his makes more sense lol ^
     
  6. leapyear

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  7. Pompeynate

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    "nosh" is to eat, but round here it has been given an extra meaning to mean have a "nosh on my cock". So I guess it depends on what context the rest of the story is as to if it means simply having some food, or something dirtier! :tongue:
     
  8. nudeyorker

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    I like your translation better!
     
  9. D_Relentless Original

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    Hmm sounds yummy. I asked for a muffin in Newcastle and Got slapped, I meant a breadroll we call them muffins, the girl thought I meant her fanny..:eek:
     
  10. Drifterwood

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    China plate is cockney rhyme for Mate (friend).
     
  11. Tremaine

    Tremaine Active Member

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    I would say that this is the most accurate translation.

    Well me ol' china ..., that was a fair treat you set before us, I nearly had to run down the apples and rack me ol' noggin. :rolleyes:
     
  12. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

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    hilaire, a Cockney-Irish cunt.
     
  13. B_stanmarsh14

    B_stanmarsh14 New Member

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    Ahhhhhh, the old bread roll / cob issue, that I was warned about many times, during my GCSE's in school.

    All depended what score you got, as to where the exam marker was from, if they understood you or not.

    I said back to the teacher..... I'm no southern fairy, so Cob it is! :biggrin1:
     
  14. Mem

    Mem
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    In American: :biggrin1:

    1st
    Great, I've been looking for your apartment all day buddy. I think I fucked something up. I'm really tired, I could use a drink and some sleep.

    2nd
    and some guy stole my umbrella while I was waiting on line (or "in line" depending on your regional American dialect) to use the bathroom back in England.

    3rd
    I'm about to get pissed off. Great, I'm happy about it too, wow, your friend is nice, any chance for some head?
     
  15. Joll

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    Pompey's is pretty accurate. The nosh up prolly refers to a meal tho, rather than a bj (which would just be a nosh, lol).

    A wobbly (or usually wobbler) is a temper tantrum. ;)
     
  16. Jason

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    This is not "real" London or Cockney English. It seems to be using 1940s terms (blighty, bevy) but also some that I think are more recent forms (chuffed). Also I don't think "china plate" would ever be used in this way. Rhyming slang usually works by dropping the rhyming word, so just china - indeed the set phrase is "me ole china" (my old/good mate) or "yer ole china".

    Doesn't gormey come from Gord blimey, therefore meaning offensive, rude, crude, uneducated, vulgar?

    "Nosh up" means a meal, as Joll has suggested.

    My version of moderb London though I'm sure many could do better:

    Nice one! Been havin' a butcher's for your place all day mate, thought I'd fucked summink up! I'm well creamed, I could do with a brew and a kip!

    Plus some geezer nabbed me brolly [who has a brolly today?] in the queue for the khazi [never a queue for the Gents] back in Blighty [1940s]...

    The third line: I'm about to throw a fucking spas! Cheers mate, i'm chuffed as well, shit, your pal's a bit gord blimey, ain't he?, any chance of a nosh up?.
     
  17. Incocknito

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    What book is this? And no one uses that much slang. It's like someone who isn't from the UK (American maybe) has made up the character. That may or may not "fit" with the context of the book.

    But from what I've read I don't like it.
     
  18. Mem

    Mem
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    The nosh line is followed by saying his friend is nice, so I would think it implies a BJ more than a meal.
     
  19. nudeyorker

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    A quick google search of "Some bloke diddled me brolly" came up with this! Language Geek :rolleyes:
     
  20. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

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    No your right Jason, it's totally made up Cockney, not at all how people from my part of London really speak.


    I think Gormey in this case is a very unclear, I took it to mean the opposite of gormless. I've heard Londoners use Gorm to mean stupid and a shortening of gormless, but gormless also has the connotation of ugliness as well as stupidness, and I think Gormey can be used to mean "cuteness" or "attractiveness" as the opposite of being without gorm, i.e. gormless.


    I think your reading could be correct too though, and that third line of yours is a good alternative.


    I still think Nosh or Nosh up could be Blow Job though even in your alternative third line.


    In any event whoever wrote that dialogue was not a Londoner, using "summat" was the really big give away for me, that's totally nothern and not London slang or dialect at all.
     
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