Networking in the 21st Century

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Sassy, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. Sassy

    Sassy Member

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    My alma mater has asked me to lead a seminar on networking, not the social on-line networking, but the face-to-face networking that is related to career searches and advancement.

    In this day and age, does face-to-face networking even have any value? Or does it only have value for the older generations who did not grow up with Facebook, MySpace and Twitter, etc.? Why SHOULD anyone learn the old-fashioned networking anymore? Is it more or less valuable than the on-line variety?

    Are the majority of jobs still learned of through word-of-mouth? I used to be told that it was 70% (in which case networking made sense). With the large number of corporations doing so much of their recruiting on-line, is this figure still valid?

    When discussing recruitment with colleagues, the majority tell me that they tell potential employees to simply check their websites, or some of the career websites (rather than referring them to an individual or contact). I understand the value for security reasons, and to keep employees from being overwhelmed, but I see it as a hindrance, as I often found the best employees through mutual acquaintances, not over an impersonal website (however wonderful the screening process is).

    Anything I should or should not include in this seminar? Thoughts? Comments?
     
  2. invisibleman

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    What means do people network? Why do people network?

    What is the job market seeking in networking situations? Could it be like computer dating except you are looking for that special candidate? Candidates are looking for that potential employer?

    What are the turn-offs for both potential employers and potential employees of networking?

    There is value in relationships. I hope that people never lose sight in face-to-face interactions. I think people use PCs, laptops, smartphones and PDAs to the point of being impersonal. The best thing about the internet is that you don't have to waste a bunch of paper and postage sending resumes to a lot of companies only never hearing from employers if they got your cover letter, resume, and application. Or you go through the trouble of sending them your application kit--and they send you canned Xerox-ed "rejection" correspondence with your name handwritten in the proper spots and sent off metered. :rolleyes:

    With the internet...the responses are immediate.

    I think that the best thing when networking is honesty. Telling people what you can and cannot do for them. Employers should express what they are seeking in a candidate and what they are willing to give to that particular candidate. Candidates should be willing to tell prospective employers what they are offering to the company and what they need from their potential jobs and line bosses.

    Successful networking boils down to high affinity. You like the boss and the business you may potentially work for. A boss likes you and what you may be able to offer the company and its operating objectives.

    Unsuccessful networking boils down to low affinity. Your potential boss doesn't offer what you need. You don't have what the boss feels is best for their company and objectives.










     
  3. Sassy

    Sassy Member

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    ^^^^What about a college grad/job seeker looking to make contacts? Particularly those individuals who've never networked before? What would you advise them?

    Thank you so much for your insightful comments, IM!
    :smile:
     
  4. nudeyorker

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    I've been thinking about this since you posted it. The work that I have done and now do; social networking would be of little to no value. However the best advice I give to recent grads is to join the organizations of the field they wish to enter or do some pro bono work for the organization. Wish I could offer more advice, I have an agent out looking for my next gig.
     
    #4 nudeyorker, Apr 3, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2010
  5. Sassy

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    I'd hire you if I could (What is it you do again?). :smile:

    Another motivator to learn social networking is the value of NW once someone is in a career. After all, getting stuff done and being successful in a job can benefit from having established good relationships with colleagues (again, using networking skills).
     
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