"New" STD: LGV Lymphogranuloma Venereum

Discussion in 'The Healthy Penis' started by SouthernGirl, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. SouthernGirl

    SouthernGirl Member

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    Well it's not new. It's just not common in the states.
    And the CDC is NOT doing their job with educating the masses.
    Once AGAIN, this is not on their high priority list because the last few outbreaks that occured years ago happened among the gay male population.

    STD Facts - LGV

    A 23yr old man and now a 19yr old female just died in GA a few weeks ago and the asses at the hospital and my facility could not ID this for 7 days.

    LGV kills quickly because the ulcers causes you to bleed out.
    By the time you get to the ER the docs won't know what to do, you'll just continue to bleed and die.

    The CDC won't acknowledge the fact that they missed crucial data by ignoring these symtoms among those who are HIV positive. A person could be HIV+, have undiagnosed LGV, die, and the doctors will just contribute to whatever miscellaneous-HIV-cause-of-death instead of testing for LGV and tracking it among the population.

    Most healthcare professionals are not aware of the symptoms or seriousness of LGV to even suspect & to send it for testing which would still take forever!

    And their are still people who participate in anal receptive sex are too afraid to admit it to their doctor.

    I feel that the CDC ain't moving their ass fast enough. The last outbreak was in 2005. By now they should have developed something to swab booty and ID this. If you go into any county health department you won't see 1 pamplet on LGV. Even in clinics that treat a high number of MSM patients and prostitutes.
     
  2. cbrmale

    Gold Member

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    It's not new, it was first identified in the nineteenth century. It's rarely fatal, and it's easily cured with antibiotics. The current outbreaks are largely confined to male homosexuals. For an LGV outbreak in the genital region, a standard chlamydia test should suffice. If the test result is positive, the standard treatment for chlamydia is antibiotics, which will also cure LGV. So, largely, there isn't a problem.
     
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