Occupy Wukan, China --

Discussion in 'Politics' started by helgaleena, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. helgaleena

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    Chinese Village Plots Taking Protest Wider - WSJ.com

    China village resists officials' land confiscations - latimes.com

    Residents have barricaded their fishing village of 20,000 people for a week in protest against land confiscations by Chinese government authorities. The protest is expected to be violent during the weekend, when a memorial service is scheduled for a protest leader who villagers say was beaten to death while in custody.

    Xue Jinbo, 42, died Sunday after two days in custody. Chinese authorities say he suffered a heart attack, but family members say the body showed signs of beating and torture. Although the body has yet to be released, family members say they will nevertheless begin services for him this weekend.

    "Even if we don't have his body, we will have a ceremony to let his soul rest in peace," said a 24-year-old villager, surnamed Gao, who is engaged to Xue's daughter.

    Like many in rural China during the last decade, Wukan's residents have seen what had been collectively owned village land sold for real estate development, enriching local government but leaving many residents poor. Wukan's villagers have refused to succumb, battling authorities in recent years with rocks and sharpened bamboo sticks and other homemade weapons.


    Yes, when a person in jail has a heart attack, his thumbs get dislocated and his ribs break.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2011\12\20\story_20-12-2011_pg14_7

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204058404577106460571205408.html Neighboring villages are donating food to Wukan despite police saying they are the ones doing the barricading...
     
    #1 helgaleena, Dec 19, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2011
  2. Jason

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    Wukan and the occupy movement in western nations are as different as chalk and cheese. Trying to link them is IMO unhelpful to the people of Wukan.
     
  3. helgaleena

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    Nope. Corruption in high places is the problem, the world around.
     
  4. Jason

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    There has always been corruption in high places and always will be. This is not sufficient similarity to link the protests.

    The Chinese government would love to be able to compare the Wukan siege with the western occupy movement. China knows that occupy has limited support in the west and a lot of opposition, including very powerful political opposition. If they could make the link in western minds between Wukan and occupy then they have scored a propaganda coup. Don't help the repressive Chinese government. The people of Wukan have enough problems without making their lot worse.
     
  5. helgaleena

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    I think you have it backwards, Jason. The only Western minds that think the Occupy movement has no support are mistaken too. Numbers bear this out.

    Other than disliking my use of a specific verb, have you anything to say regarding the situation and what it may mean for local autonomy in that land?

    It is very funny that the authorities insist they are cordoning off the village, while the villagers say they are keeping out the authorities. Which ones shall we believe?
     
    #5 helgaleena, Dec 20, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
  6. helgaleena

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    Rise of the Planet of the Humans - Technorati Politics

    Weekly Roundup: Protesters, B-Corps and More Protesters | Dowser

    China's Wealth Disparity Erupts in Wukan Protests - BusinessWeek

    ‘Occupy’ protests come to China, and the Party is shaken | Firstpost

    Nope, Helga didn't link these two concepts first. These articles are 3-4 days old.

    "The share of income collected by the top 1 percent of China’s earners more than doubled between 1986 and 2003, to 5.87 percent, according to the incomes database of Facundo Alvaredo, Tony Atkinson, Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez. (That was still lower than the share held at the time by their U.S. counterparts, 14.87 percent.) China ranked 53rd on the CIA’s list of countries with the most unequal incomes — lower than the U.S. (40) — based on 2007 data."

    The recent 'Chinese economic miracle' started in this very province, incidentally.
     
    #6 helgaleena, Dec 20, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011
  7. Jason

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    IMO comparing Wukan with Occupy is a kick in the teeth for the people of Wukan and supports the international presentational agenda of the Chinese authorities.
     
  8. helgaleena

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    Wukan villagers end protest after getting key concessions - The Irish Times - Thu, Dec 22, 2011

    "
    Protests in China have become relatively common, and tend to be linked to official corruption, high wages, land grabs or pollution.
    The authorities have bought their way out of unrest before, conceding to wage demands or anger over land grabs to offset the prospect of unrest. But Wukan marks a milestone in a series of public displays of anger at corruption by unscrupulous cadres and unchecked development at the expense of the disenfranchised individual.
    Normally local government gives in to demands, and then punishes ringleaders. However, Wukan was particularly high-profile, so it remains to be seen whether government can safely follow through on punishing those involved in organising the protests.
    News of the unrest in Wukan was spread via the Weibo social network and there has been some contagion to other localities.
    To the northeast of Wukan, the town of Haimen saw a second day of protests yesterday over a planned coal-fired power plant.
    Unrest in Guangdong province and other economically advanced areas of China has a particularly jarring effect because it is comes from the rising middle classes that form the core support for the ruling Communist Party.
    The Wukan protest has always been about local issues, and protesters have been very slow to criticise the party itself, expressing the belief that central government has their best interests at heart. "
     
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