Ocd

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by dags, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. dags

    dags New Member

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    I would like to hear from members who would like to share their experiences with OCD. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Does anyone have it or know a friend or family member who does? For someone who has lived their whole life untreated and who wont ever seek help, such as a parent, what are some good strategies to deal with them? From what I've experienced, there are good days, where it subsides or is pretty undetectable and you can interact in a healthy way and there are days where you just want to scream! Are there varying degrees? I would like to hear from anyone who wants to share their experience and a request to NIC for his advice as well. Bear in mind I need advice on just dealing with it and how. The person in question will not ever admit they have it or they need help. I know it genetically runs in families, or one is more susceptible if a parent has it.
     
  2. baseball99

    baseball99 New Member

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    I'm diagnosed OCD and have been for years. I attempted treatment once for it but the side effects were too much for me. I have learned to control it and get rid of some of the worse obsessions and put them more towards useful obsessions. One thing i dont understand tho is every other OCD that I know is ridiculously neat and im definitely not
     
  3. Nitrofiend

    Nitrofiend New Member

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    I was clinically OCD up until I realized you had to get dirty to have a girlfriend. Then I healed over some time. Actually I have no real advice for it, but if you knew me before I got better, I was quite a headcase. It has to be a slow transition, but I'm not a doctor so *shrug*. Some people have it much worse than others.
     
  4. snoozan

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    I'm not sure of the exact situation you're in, but there are a few things that stand out to me. I'm assuming from your post, this is not you.

    First, has this person ever been formally diagnosed by a psychologist or a psychiatrist? If not, how do you know this person is OCD? Is it your assessment, or other people's? What makes you think that this person is OCD? It really takes a trained professional to make the call about this because there are a lot of things that may look like OCD but really are not.

    With any mental illness, there are good and bad days. The goal of treatment is to lessen the number of bad days and increase the number of good days. OCD is best treated with behavioral therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. Medication can also help. From what I understand, OCD for various reasons can be difficult to treat.

    There are varying degrees of OCD and related disorders. OCPD, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, is very similar to OCD, but tends to present as a pervasive personality style. People with OCPD can be thought of as "super-perfectionists". These people generally don't have to perform the ritualistic actions that are a hallmark of OCD. There are very specific diagnostic criteria for OCD, which, if not met, don't mean the person doesn't have OCD-like traits or behaviors. Some people diagnosed with OCD remain mostly functional, and some are very crippled by their illness. The diagnosis itself hinges on whether the OCD obessions and/or compulsions interfere with daily life.

    If this person will not admit a problem or willingly seek treatment, there's not a lot you can do unless there is an immediate threat to cause harm to themselves or others, in which case, you can have the person committed for whatever is mandatory in your state/locality. Otherwise, there's not a lot you can do to force them to seek help. Treatment doesn't work unless the person being treated is aware of their ilness and is committed to treatment no matter how hard, inconvenient, and at times useless treatment may seem.

    The only way to deal with a person that won't get treatment or admit their problem is to realize that you can't change it, and that you must accept them as they are. If, in light of this, you have to change or reasses your relationship with this person, that's what you have to do. You can't change anyone except yourself and how you deal with this person.

    If you have any other specific questions or concerns, I'm sure there are plenty of people here that will be able to help you answer them.

    Though having cleanliness obsessions and compulsions is almost always what we think of as OCD in popular culture, it isn't necessarily so. I know many people with OCD that are messy. In fact, some people with OCD are also hoarders, which is many times the antithesis of compulsive neatness. Pure obsessional OCD has no compulsive or ritualistic behaviors associated with it so the person may or may not be neat independent of their illness. OCD obsessions and compulsions don't have to be about neatness or cleanliness at all. They can be ritualistic couting, religious obsessions, etc. Cleanliness/neatness doesn't have to be a part of the illness at all.

    I would venture to say that it's more someone that is OCPD that is likely to display perfectionistic cleanliness. People with OCD tend to have an overall need for everything to be "right" and if they are not, it causes anxiety. Even when someone with OCPD obsesses over cleanliness, a lot of times the very thought of cleaning can be so over whelming he/she just avoids it altogether.

    Again, there are a lot of clinical subtleties that only a trained professional understands and then can ferret out from there a diagnosis based on a person's history, behaviors, and thought patterns.

    Take care.

    Snoozan
     
  5. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    I was diagnosed with OCD at one time ... a mild case, I imagine, but I did compulsively keep count of many things, was driven nuts if every last personal effect was not in its place, and washed my hands perhaps 20 times a day.
    For some reason, I was obsessed with the number 3.
    My symptoms disappeared over time -- so now I'm if anything a bit of a slob.
    No one would call me obsessive-compulsive now, I don't think.

    I'm not sure if any of this is relevant to whatever situation you're facing, dags.
    I can say that getting angry or annoyed with a person's repetitive rituals and thoughts would be useless. (I'm sure you know this.)
    You probably know that various SSRI antidepressants have been found effective with OCD, especially, I believe, Prozac. But there are some side-effects.
    But such facts don't help if the affected person doesn't acknowledge the problem or wish to seek treatment.
     
  6. dags

    dags New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies.
     
  7. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    OCD runs in my father's side of the family, I think most of them have it. My father has never officially been diagnosed but he so obviously displays symptoms. It doesn't have a ruinous effect on his life or anything... but it does make him slightly irritating to be around sometimes. I think I, too, suffer from a mild case. I used to be something of a perfectionist and overachiever in school and at around eight or nine years old the amount of stress this caused me was almost unbearable. My little inexplicable ritual involved pushing my forearm over open books. This sometimes helped me cope with the stress a little. At around 14 years of age or so, I was still very stressed out from school, in addition to being horribly depressed due to issues with my lovelife or lack thereof, and around the fourth quarter of my freshman year in high school I made the conscious decision that it was all not worth it. That the level of pain and stress I was going through to achieve something that ultimately meant very little to me in the grand scheme of things- my grades in high school- was ridiculous. It was killing me. I took a step back, completely mellowed out, and felt much better. My grades plummeted, but I think my mental health improved enormously. I haven't done that OCD ritual I described since I was probably 11 or 12, and since freshman year in high school I haven't obsessed about anything to the point of it becoming an unhealthy source of crippling stress. Sometimes I wish I wasn't quite so mellow and devil-may-care these days.... but ultimately I think it was a good change.

    My case was, as I mentioned, pretty mild next to what many suffer from. I was able to overcome it for the most part completely on my own through force of will. Other people I would say need to seek help, if they need it, on an individual basis. Everyone is different. Of course, if the person won't admit to a problem or doesn't want help, getting them some is very nearly impossible. I know this from a long painful history of schizophrenia and other mental illnesses in my mother's side of the family (not the side with OCD). If you're trying to get help for someone you know, there's really not a lot you can do, other than talking to that person and trying to convince them that it might be worth it to look into treatment for any of the stress, anxiety, or social awkwardness the disorder may cause them.
     
  8. baseball99

    baseball99 New Member

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    I should probably clarify my statement. Its not that I dont understand why im not near and everyone else with OCD that I know is but rather, I find it interesting that I am not neat.....

    Also, OCD is believed to have more of an organic cause, able to be observed on (oh boy here we go) fMRI whereas OCPD is a personality disorder (hence the name)

    They are similar but develop under completely different aetiologies

    Also, yes if you have concerns there are probably people here who can relate and talk to you but never ever ever ever ever ever ever ever accept medical advice over the internet, no matter how knowledgable the person may seem. These are things that you absolutely must see your doctor about if you have questions regarding your health. Alot of us can answer questions on common treatments, behavioral modifications, etc.....but no one should be offering or taking medical advice
     
  9. snoozan

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    My point was less about etiology and more that they share similar characteristics, and many times I think popular culture confuses OCD and OCPD. Compulsive neatness seems to be a trait that is more related to OCPD than OCD.

    I think the verdict is still out on whether personality disorders have an organic cause or not. OCD and OCPD have been found to be significantly comorbid, which suggests some sort of relationship.

    If you can PM me or post abstracts from studies that you've found that show distinct etiologies between OCD and OCPD, I'd be very interested to see them. I'm not trying to be bitchy, I'm sincerely interested in this.

    Snoozan
     
  10. BuddyBoy

    BuddyBoy Member

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    Ding ding ding ding! We have a winner. :biggrin1:

    I have a fairly mild case of OCD, which flares up into a full blown episode from time to time. Prozac controlled it nicely, but after five years on the stuff, I started to have some serious side effects. Effexor, which I've now been taking for 10 years, doesn't keep the OCD in check nearly as well.

    I'm the messy OCD type, and a hoarder slash pack-rat. If there is something I like, I start to worry that the one I have might break, or that I'll go to the store to get another one and it will have been discontinued.

    Can you say "storage issues?"
     
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