OMG!! They ate Snapping Turtle

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by The Dragon, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. The Dragon

    The Dragon New Member

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    On a recent episode of Heston Blumenthal's Feasts they showed Heston in one of the Southern states of America trapping and then eating Snapping Turtles!

    How common is this and aren't they a protected species?

    Here in Australia all native Turtles (this includes all Marine Turtles) are protected species and only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are allowed to kill and eat them.
     
  2. B_Hickboy

    B_Hickboy New Member

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    Drink up!
     
  3. HazelGod

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    I had lunch at a steakhouse in Houston last week with a friend of mine who took it upon herself to castigate the waiter over the fact that the daily special included a cup of turtle soup.

    To his credit, he played it off as best he could...but that said, no, not all turtles here in the Americas are threatened.
     
  4. The Dragon

    The Dragon New Member

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    When I say "protected" I mean that takes in ALL Australia wildlife regardless if they be endangered, threatened or common.

    It takes special licences and permits to collect, harvest or keep Australian native fauna.
     
    #4 The Dragon, Nov 15, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  5. helgaleena

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    Snapping turtle was a known item on the menu of my in-laws, Native Americans of the state of Wisconsin. Round hereabouts snappers can grow as large as an alligator or a sturgeon, easily, and they'll do serious damage with that beaky jaw of theirs. Not protected at all. Most people don't hassle them out of respect.

    The nineteenth century yen for turtle soup and tortoise shell jewelry and combs is what endangered them worldwide. Most smaller species are endangered largely because they get run over when trying to migrate to their nesting sites by humans building roads in the way.
     
  6. The Dragon

    The Dragon New Member

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    Thanks for the explanation, Helgaleena.

    As big as an Alligator!
    Wow and people normally get freaked by our Australian beasties.
    Are they aggressive towards humans without provocation?
     
  7. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    You're joshin, right, helgaleena?
    Maybe you mean the alligator snapping turtle, a different species ... and not usually at all the size of a full-grown alligator.
     
    #7 D_Gunther Snotpole, Nov 15, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  8. helgaleena

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    They spend most of their time at the bottom of any lake or river, eating smaller beings down below. Anglers now and then hook one in the leg and get a nasty surprise when they reel in. Otherwise, no.

    I did get bitten in the foot by a small one when wading in a creek as a youngster. Needed stitches.

    No! I am not joshing! You should see the one that lives in Madison Zoo; it's hideous.

    Found you a photo. http://www.thatpetplace.com/images/Promotions_Image_Files/Frank36.jpg
     
    #8 helgaleena, Nov 15, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  9. b.c.

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  10. helgaleena

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    Hhuck, if they were in a southern state, I'll bet they ate alligator snapper. But the common snapping turtle is the one to which I refer. It can grow to 100 lb, say 40 k. The only difference is it hasn't got one horn like point on the mouth, but two horns like rat teeth. Also its top shell is slightly smoother.
     
  11. The Dragon

    The Dragon New Member

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    I can see what you mean about that beak!
    They'd do a butt load of damage if they got pissed off.
     
  12. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    Well, h., forgive the pedant in me ... I mean, a 100 lb. turtle is darn big ... but that isn't the size of an alligator.
     
  13. B_subgirrl

    B_subgirrl New Member

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  14. maxcok

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    There seems to be some misinformation floating about. The Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) has a significantly wider North American range and is not on any endangered species list I am aware of, but the much larger Alligator Snapping Turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) is on a few such lists including the IUCN [International Union for Conservation of Nature] and has varying local protection in some US states. Currently it's under review by the US Threatened and Endangered Species program and possible protection is pending.

    Common snappers may grow as large as 75# in captivity, so I suppose 100# is theoretically possible. Alligator snappers in captivity have reached documented weights near 250# and anecdotally 400#. Typically they would be much smaller found in the wild. Either can be aggressive when encountered, the common variety being perhaps the more aggressive, especially on land where they cannot easily escape by swimming. Both should be treated with respect and approached with extreme caution. Their powerful beaked jaws can easily amputate fingers, toes, or . . . other appendages. :eek:

     
    #14 maxcok, Nov 16, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  15. The Dragon

    The Dragon New Member

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    Wow!

    Thanks Max for the in depth answer.
     
  16. Empathizer

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    That huge turtle is making me all kinds of unsettled... GAH!
     
  17. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

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    Oh he's freaky looking, but I like him, he's cute :tongue: But then I have a soft spot for amphibians and reptiles.
     
  18. luka82

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    I used to have two turtles when I was a kid.
    Thy gave me no offsprings! :(
     
  19. Drifterwood

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    Strangely though, your mother never ran out of eggs. :wink:
     
  20. luka82

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    :biggrin1:
     
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