Other US 2010 Midterm Statistics

Discussion in 'Politics' started by B_VinylBoy, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Here are other interesting statistics from last night's midterm elections beyond the obvious:

    1. A record 123 openly gay candidates were on the ballot in elections across the country this year, and many of them emerged victorious including Barney Frank in Massachusetts, Tammy Baldwin in Wisconsin and David Cicilline in RHode Island.

    2. Progressive liberals were hit hard last night including those like Alan Grayson (Florida) & Russ Feingold (Wisconsin) who lost their election bids.

    3. Most of the top recipients of Wall Street dollars won on Tuesday, including Republican Rob Portman (Ohio) and Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand (New York).

    4. The majority of candidates who were self funded including Meg Whitman (California) lost.


    Discuss.
     
  2. dandelion

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    The tea party is an anti-government one. Although it seems more naturally allied with the republicans, they are certainly not anti-government. They are trying to ride the tiger, but ultimately there is a conflict of interest.

    I take it there is a massive rejection in the US of spending because of phenomenal national debt. This naturally affects the left most, but how will the republicans react to , say, 50% military cuts and a withdrawal from foreign adventurism?

    Did the dollars make the winners, or did the donors simply try to ingratiate themselves with the people they thought would win anyway?
     
  3. JTalbain

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    The Republican Party made a short term alliance with the Tea Party so they didn't get screwed this election, but I'm wondering how long that will last. If the Tea Party keeps its brand alive, Republicans will find disentangling themselves difficult once they have conflicts of interest and can no longer work together. It'll be tricky in the years to come.
     
  4. dandelion

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    there is a somewhat analogous case in britain right now, where the liberal party found itself in the coalition government with conservatives. fine right now, but I have no idea what will happen come the next election. The conservatives probably hope they will rid themselves of the need for a partner. Who knows.
     
  5. houtx48

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    We will see how anti government the teabaggers are after they have been there for a year. I guess it will depend on how much money the Khock Brothers send.
     
  6. Bbucko

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    A major difference between the Liberal Party and the Teabaggers is history; Teabaggery is really just a reactionary off-shoot of (and a distortion of the worst excesses of) the Republican base. The Liberals have been part of the British electoral landscape for a very long time.

    They only came into being following Obama's inaugural: they are an "astroturfed" creation of big money and some tired old saws voted out of office in the Democratic waves of 2006 and 2008. There is nothing "organic" or "grassroots" about them at all. They are either deeply, cynically disingenuous or else so poorly informed that they actually believe all that Socialist/Marxist/Birther bullshit.

    The GOP emerged from the chaos in American politics leading up to the Civil War, and were intent on preserving the Union (i.e US Government) at the cost of a dreadful war; The Democrats, at the time, were all about "States' Rights" and other code-words meant to limit the reach of the Federal Authorities. The switch took decades to complete, and wasn't finalized for about 100 years in the 1960s, but now the parties are pretty much polar opposites of their founder's intent.

    Any hopes of the GOP shaking off its "rump-base" of assorted crazy is a deep exercise in wishful thinking. Only time will tell if the Teabaggers are sent back into the "crazy-aunt" attic (where they've been pandered to and kept for years) after an electoral meltdown in 2012 or whether there will be a wholesale march of moderate Republicans to the Democratic side.

    Much as I'd love to see it, I just can't see a third party emerging in the US. The Independents are the ones who (usually) keep things sane, and by their very nature eschew partisan politics (much as they lean in one direction or another). They are simply not interested in coalescing into another party.
     
  7. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Adding another statistic to this thread (as posted by HUNGHUGE11X7)
    Of the 38 Democrats who voted AGAINST HCR, over 60% of them were defeated.
     
  8. sargon20

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    And half those damn 'blue dog Democrats' bit the dust. Good for them. Get the fuck out.
     
  9. B_24065

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    Wow. So delusional. This is why the left got destroyed last night. They are so caught up in their own bullshit narrative that they are completely disconnected from reality.
     
  10. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    I agree with you there. At the same time, I'd want to associate that with the notion that Democratic voters wanted people who are more progressive in Congress. But progressive liberals didn't do so well either. It's a very interesting statistic that's kinda hard to place in full perspective.
     
  11. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    Democrats still control one of the two parts of the Legislative branch of Government and the Executive branch. Who got destroyed again? Oh, I forgot... you think the House Of Representatives is the only part of Congress that matters.

    Are you through? The grown-ups are trying to have a real discussion here.
     
  12. Mensch1351

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    a very good observation. This also happened when the "old" Republican Party (with people like Nelson Rockefeller, Ford & Bill Scranton) bit the dust and the Reps crawled into bed with Jerry Falwell and the Moral Majority. Sad that they pander to these groups by capitalizing on the wedge issues and then find themselves in some terrible philosophical quagmires totally out of step with the majority of Americans! BTWay -- the teabaggers are as philosophically radical and "entrenched" in their ideas as the religious right. Compromising with them is next to impossible no matter WHAT party you're with!
     
  13. dandelion

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    Yes and no. Liberals continue to exist largely as a protest party. It was a surprise to everyone, not least themselves, that they are now in government. Their support is greatest when the other two major parties are hated equally.Their problem next time around will be that they have taken sides, so not much use as a protest vote. Their popular support in polls is down to half or 1/3 what it was before the election.

    Well Im not american and have limited information. What I have seen suggest that whoever their candidates are, their support stems from an utter distaste by americans for their government. They are voting to destroy said government which has failed them. I doubt the governments record will be any better in 2 years time.


    In the UK the conservative party has its own right wing crazies. So does the labour left, of course, and both parties are in constant internal warfare to present a centrist policy to electors. The benefit of the liberals to Cameron is that he can face off the generally centre/left liberals against his own right wingers. The badge 'liberal' covers quite a range of misfits who tend not to be easy to label conventionally, but many would be entirely happy as left wing conservatives, or right wing labour. So Cameron gets to reinforce the centrist side of his party, which is where he is most comfortable.

    I would thing the tea and republican parties are currently tussling with each other to see which manages to use the other. The liberals might be utterly destroyed next time round, or they might manage to establish themselves as the natural left in government (quite a big 'might' at the moment). Since the tea party is an expression of public distaste with goverrnment it isnt obvious to me that it will be gone by the next elections. The nature of US government seems to give infinite opportunity to blame everything on the other side blocking your actions. This must be at least part of what voters hate. But come next time the economy will be worse, nothing major will have changed, there may have been major stand offs over the budget, the state will be just as big. The tea baggers will still be screaming against democrats, and presumably also against the republican establishment. I think they will do better next time. It may depend on how well they can concentrate on core anti-government values.

    Since they wont have power now, you may have to wait until after their decisive win in 2012 before they get a chance to act, and the nation can decide if they really like what they get.

    I still say, the US main problem is the 25% of the budget spent on defence. Is anyone in favour of cutting this?
     
  14. MichiganRico

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    ... So much concern being expressed by both Democrats and Republicans for the fate of our "future generations," yet only 11% of the 18-29 year olds voted in the mid-terms. Apparently there is now another significant independent party, "The Alfred E. Neuman Party."
     

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  15. B_VinylBoy

    B_VinylBoy New Member

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    IMO, the youth vote would have turned out in bigger numbers if the administration was more adamant in voicing how Congress passed a Student Loan Reform bill and explained the details within. It actually eliminates the middle man and saves students a lot of money in the process. Students are concerned with the Economy and Jobs like everyone else, however, that topic hits home just like Medicare & Social Security connects with older people.

    That's a failure of obvious communication from the Democrats (among many others) these last few years.
     
  16. sargon20

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    The youth did not get out and vote.


    Letter to a whiny young Democrat
     
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