Paris Most Shocking

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by D_Barbi_Queue, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. D_Barbi_Queue

    D_Barbi_Queue Account Disabled

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    So yesterday I'm bored off my ass and tuned into a show on VH1 called Paris' Most Shocking. They counted down some of her most shocking moments in her short little life. One of the highlighted moments is when she claimed to coin the term "That's hot" and they showed her wearing a t-shirt that said such on the front of it.

    Now the thing that got me was that on the back of the shirt, it said "Your not" - anyone else get my disappointment?

    VH1 never even pointed it out. Are they just as stupid as her?
     
  2. dickbulge

    dickbulge New Member

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    TAG has your cat been hitting the cat-nip?
     
  3. D_Barbi_Queue

    D_Barbi_Queue Account Disabled

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    no. :blush: Did you not notice the error?
     
  4. prepstudinsc

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    TAG, would you expect Paris to have something proper? She's a two-bit ho. I don't think that she even knows how to spell. It just goes to prove that you can be white trash even if you're rich.
     
  5. B_DoubleMeatWhopper

    B_DoubleMeatWhopper New Member

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    Take a look at some of the posts on this site: even some of the best educated members seem to confuse your and you're, not to mention they're, there and their. The one that really grates on my last fucking nerve is getting are and or. How can you do that? :eek: Such errors are not allowed in my English classes.

    What's really Most Shocking about Paris is the fact that she's a celebrity. Uh ... why?
     
  6. Imported

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    NelsonMuntz84:
    We used to get shouted at for using you're :eyes: we had to use, you are.
    The same with they're.

    Another popular one we used to get told after spelling tests was that if we were American we'd be good spellers, but unfortunatly we weren't :lol:

    Your right about Paris, her 15 mins must be up, bring in the Paris ho train. :evilgrin:
     
  7. Leung

    Leung New Member

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    Don't you mean are and our DWM? :p
     
  8. B_RoysToy

    B_RoysToy New Member

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    There's no telling where our language will be in another generation, with the internet and different languages mixing with our traditional 'proper' English dialect. Each succeeding edition of our dictionary adds words never heard of at the last one's publication. Technology and globalization demand fluidity of language.
     
  9. Leung

    Leung New Member

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    There is no "proper" English anymore (except the Queen's English) a lot is being Americanised (or Americanized) which I think is a shame :( Give me aluminium any day!
     
  10. B_DoubleMeatWhopper

    B_DoubleMeatWhopper New Member

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    Don't you mean are and our DWM? :p
    [post=298549]Quoted post[/post]​
    [/b][/quote]

    No. I mean as in 'this are that' rather than 'this or that'.
     
  11. D_Barbi_Queue

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    Don't you know that she's a reality tv and porn star now? :lol:

    I know that everyone makes errors, especially when putting down a quick response to a post. The thing that irked me is that they were picking on every little thing about Paris but missed one of the funniest ones while putting together this whole production.
     
  12. Leung

    Leung New Member

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    No. I mean as in 'this are that' rather than 'this or that'.
    [post=298587]Quoted post[/post]​
    [/b][/quote]

    Lol, sorry DMW! :blush: I have never heard that one before! My pet peeve is when people write "This is are house" etc. so annoying! :grr:
     
  13. steve319

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    [/quote]

    No. I mean as in 'this are that' rather than 'this or that'.
    [post=298587]Quoted post[/post]​
    [/quote]

    That one might be a distinctly southern one, DMW! A spell-it-like-it-sounds thing for our dialect. But I totally feel your pain there.

    What about "cuz" instead of "cause" for a painful one?

    That's a pretty good example of the ones that kill me: purposeful misspelling for the sake of cuteness or hipness. I blame institutions like "Toys 'R' Us" and the like for some of it. Plus hipster spellings like "da" for "the" are really affecting the way kids write. Is this indicative of the fact that kids only read these days from printed song lyrics or webpages or something? (Good God, did I just make a "kids these days" statement? I have to go lie down now.)

    I'm not a grammar prude or anything; I think that language should be fluid and change over time, but these purposeful ones in big business for the sake of "cool-by-association" and capital gain really anger me.

    But in message boards and the like, it doesn't bother me. It's colorfully fun. Maybe for me it's a matter of "abusing the rules only after you have mastered them" thing.

    (The instant messaging phenomenon is only going to make it worse, don't you think?)
     
  14. Imported

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    hung_big:
    That's rather leniant. We're not allowed to use coloquial or abbreviated terms in our classroom, especially in formal writing such as essays and exposes.

    And I've never understood how people could get those words confused, they are very distinct and different. They don't even all begin and end with the same letters. I've been drilled with those words since I was in third grade, if not earlier.

    I'd like to be there when you crack down on your students. ;) :9

    Just out of curiosity Jacinto, what grades do you teach English? I've never known. I know it's highschool, but any grades in particular? And which do you find are the worst overall (attendance, tardiness, grammar - everything)?
     
  15. Pices2325

    Pices2325 New Member

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    I like Paris and I doubt that she made that shirt herself. So to blame the spelling mistake on her would be stupider than she is. Although she probably never noticed, I doubt anyone really cares because she is hott. I really dont care if she gets different forms of words mixed up because I do too. No one is perfect, but we try :)

    P.S. in your title "Paris' Most Shocking" technically it should be "Paris's Most Shocking" because there is only one Paris (singular form). So you really should cut her some slack.
     
  16. prepstudinsc

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    I remember being taught that if a word ended in "s" and it was to be made possesive, one would add the apostrophe after the s, rather than making the word end in "s's". When writing about Chris and his bike, I wouldn't write Chris's bike, I'd just write Chris' bike. Jacinto, correct me if I'm wrong here...you're the English teacher and I graduated high school in 1987, so some of my proper grammar may a little rusty.
     
  17. Imported

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    hung_big: I'm no english teacher, but I do take english and know my grammar, and that would be correct prep. If a word is already plural (what an 's' alright at the end) then you just put an apostrophe after it. :)

    My teacher grounded me into the floor for it once before (in 5th grade) and I've remembered it since.
     
  18. prepstudinsc

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    You should know since your name ends with an s...I picked the name Chris in my example because it popped into my head, the other name that came to my head was Jesus, but I didn't want to use him as an example LOL
     
  19. Imported

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    hung_big: Jesus' cross was heavy :lol: That works too :) But I like my bike better....even though my bike is crap and I don't ride it....:D
     
  20. steve319

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    Actually, there's some dissention over the rules governing punctuation with possessive nouns in recent years. For the most part, there's been a movement to simplify things from the traditional approach.

    My understanding is that, traditionally, the rule has been that all singular nouns are made possessive by the addition of 's to the end. Even singluar nouns like "Chris" that already have an s (Chris's).

    In recent years, the move has been more toward simplifying the rules to make singular nouns ending in s fall in with plural possessive nouns and just add an ' after the already-present s (Chris'). As you might imagine, it's not the grammarians of the world who are championing the simplification route!

    Of course, there's also the more complex and hard-to-remember version that relies on the sound and syllable situation with the word! I just clipped this explanation from www.grammarbook.com which explains it pretty well:

    To show singular possession with proper nouns ending in s or an s sound, let the pronunciation guide you. If a new syllable is required to say the name in possessive form, then add an apostrophe plus s.
    Examples Ms. Jones's office is next to Ms. Straus's.
    Texas's weather in summer can vary greatly.
    Mr. Hastings' hat blew off in the storm.
    The possessive form of Hastings does not require an extra syllable.
    Example Mrs. Lees' hair showed dark roots; it was time for an appointment with her hairdresser.
    The name of this person is Mrs. Lees.


    Fun stuff, huh?

    Anyway, the rules are kind of in flux depending on who you ask. This little piece of punctuation rule is sort of fluid right now. My advice would be not to worry too much about it unless you're in a "high stakes" situation. If you're taking a class or aiming for publication, find out which set of guidelines the instructor/institution/publication prefers.

    If anyone has a better understanding of the groups fighting this fight (funny image, there--guidebook-wielding grammar czars fighting off the lazy populists and their erasable pens), I'd love to hear about it.

    Am I the only one who gets kind of excited thinking about how we're having an honest-to-God metamorphosis in not just our usage but our punctuation rules like this? It's pretty cool, I think.

    Or maybe I just need to get out more... :unsure:
     
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