Perceived Quality of Life Influenced by Height

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. Principessa

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    Perceived Quality of Life Influenced by Height

    By: Psych Central Senior News Editor
    on Thursday, Oct, 18, 2007

    Reviewed by: John M. Grohol, Psy.D.
    on October 18, 2007 at 10:16 am


    A new study suggests adult height influences quality of life as researchers discover short people report worse physical and mental health than people of normal height.

    The large peer reviewed study which shows that short people judge their state of health to be significantly lower than their normal height peers do, is found in the journal Clinical Endocrinology.

    Data for the study came from the 2003 Health Survey for England, carried out by the UK Department of Health. In this survey, participants filled out a health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire and a nurse measured their height.

    Researchers, led by Senior Health Economist Torsten Christensen at Novo Nordisk A/S in Denmark, used this data to assess the relationship between height and HRQoL.

    A person’s health-related quality of life refers to their perceived physical and mental health over time. The questionnaire does not measure how good a person’s health actually is; it measures how good a person thinks their health is.

    The questionnaire examined five areas of well-being: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. The researchers controlled the results in the study for the effects of other well-known indicators of HRQoL such as age, gender, body weight, long-standing illness and social class. In total, this study used the results from 14 416 respondents.

    People in the shortest height category (men shorter than 162 cm and women shorter than 151 cm) reported they experience significantly lower HRQoL than people of normal height. Additionally, the shorter you are, the more pronounced this effect becomes.

    This means that a small increase in height has a much larger positive effect on a short person than it does on a person of normal height. The results predict that people who are of short stature could increase their HRQoL by 6.1 percent if their height was increased by 7 cm for men and 6 cm for women. This 6.1 percent difference in HRQoL is equivalent to the HRQoL benefits of losing 10-15 kg for an obese person (with a BMI greater than 30).

    Short height in adult life can either be due to normal development or caused by a number of diseases such as growth hormone deficiency or Turner syndrome. Treatment with growth hormone to children with these conditions can increase their final adult height by approximately 4-10 cm depending on the underlying cause.

    Previous studies have not clearly established the impact of this increase in height upon patients’ HRQoL. The results from this study show that any small increase to the height of short people can have a large positive impact upon how good they perceive their health to be when adult. HRQoL data combine physiological, physical and social well-being into one outcome measure.

    The results from this study may also be useful for health economic assessments (such as those used by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence) for calculating the benefits of treatments for short stature.
    Researcher Torsten Christensen said:
    “We know that people who are short experience more difficulties in areas of their life such as education, employment and relationships than people of normal height. However, the relationship between height and psychosocial well-being is not well understood. Using this large and nationally representative sample of the UK population, we found shorter people report that they experience lower physical and mental well-being than taller people do. Our results also indicate that the shorter someone is, the stronger this relationship becomes. For example, an increase in height of 3 cm would have a positive impact on the health related quality of life of a short person, whereas the effect of an extra 3 cm would be negligible for a person of normal height.

    Although our study does not show that short height directly causes a reduction in physical and mental health, it does indicate that short people are more likely to feel that they experience a lower health-related quality of life. However, further research is now needed to clarify the precise relationship between changes in height and health-related quality of life.”

    Source: Society for Endocrinology

    I can't help but wonder if this will do more harm than good for the people the study considers to be short. :confused:
     
  2. simcha

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    Geez, you know? These statistics sound meaningless to me. All it shows is that short people have body image issues telling them that they are somehow less healthy than taller people. It's part of society's issue with anyone who is different from what society considers as "ideal". Anyone outside of that ideal is made to feel "less than".

    So all this study shows is that shorter people have a perception that they are less healthy. It does not show that they are in fact less healthy.
     
  3. D_Kay_Sarah_Sarah

    D_Kay_Sarah_Sarah Account Disabled

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    Great, not only can i not reach the top shelf but im going to die and am mentally ill :eek:
     
  4. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Ann: "I'm going to report that guy from the 4th floor for sexual harrassment. Everytime he gets onto the elevator with me he takes a deep breath and tells me I smell good."

    Fran: "What's wrong with that?"

    Ann: "He's a dwarf."
     
  5. Gillette

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    Priceless.
     
  6. ClaireTalon

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    Let's do an indirect proof. Assuming the perceived quality of life was influenced by height. This would mean vast numbers of depressed and pessimistic fighter pilots would be ticking us off. Is that true? I can tell you: No, it's not true. Synthesis: Quality of life is not influenced by height, at least not generally.

    This reminds me of a study a few years back that said shorter people have worse career ways. Just trash all of these studies, they really don't mean anything.
     
  7. classyron

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    Figures lie and liars figure.

    That being said, I was short until the age of 15 and I got a fair amount of grief over it. Always wanted to be taller, and was too impatient to let nature take its course. Eventually it all evened out, but it still sucked when I was a kid. I know lots of successful shorter people, especially in the military. Although, there was only one US President under six feet tall...
     
  8. Principessa

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    Fighter pilots are short? :confused:

     
  9. DC_DEEP

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    Trust me, being tall has its disadvantages, too.

    From about 8th grade until I finished college, most of the desks and tables were uncomfortably small; I have to sit side-saddle in the public transportation here; I've been attacked by more than my fair share of light fixtures and other things hanging just at the upper periphery of my vision. I've learned to be especially careful when visiting friends who live in old/historic houses, and to walk up the stairs hunched over.

    Most guys I know who are over 6' 2" have at least a few scars on the tops of their heads.
     
  10. Jovial

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  11. ClaireTalon

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    You know why they used to call me Claire and her seven dwarfs?

    The tallest fighter pilot I've ever met was still shorter than me (5'10 - 5'11), he was about 5'9. Many dream of reaching the 5'7-mark. So you can say, Tom Cruise was a matching cast for his Top Gun role. And it's better that they are short, fighter cockpits are really small.
     
  12. B_Swimming Lad

    B_Swimming Lad New Member

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    Yup. My Dad was a fighter pilot and he's only 5'9". Theres not alot of room for big people in a fighters cockpit. :yup:
     
  13. ClaireTalon

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    However, they make up for that lack of height. Nothing against your Dad, who is a very nice man I am sure, but most I have met tend to have an inherent attitude of superiority towards all other things and persons who fly.
     
  14. viking1

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    How's that old saying go? "What's the difference between God and a fighter pilot?" Answer: "God doesn't think he's a fighter pilot"...
     
  15. viking1

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    How about a new thread titled: "Perceived quality of life for men influenced by penis size? That would be a very interesting study...
     
  16. Principessa

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    My dad is 6'2" and he has numerous scars on his balding pate because my 5'3" mom tends to leave kitchen cabinet doors open.:mad: Me they just thwack in the forehead.:rolleyes::mad:



    I can answer that one no need to start a new thread. :smile: Men who think they have an average or large penis think their lives are pretty darn good. Men who think they were shortchanged in the penis department often think they were shortchanged in other areas of life as well.

    I didn't do a study but I read an awful lot about this stuff here.
     
  17. ClaireTalon

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    What's the difference between a pig and a fighter pilot? - A pig wouldn't stay up all night just to fuck another pig.
     
  18. viking1

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    I would think the emphasis would be on the "larger than average".
    A lot of guys aren't satisfied with average at all...


     
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