Pick Your Pink Wisely

Discussion in 'Women's Issues' started by B_cigarbabe, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. B_cigarbabe

    B_cigarbabe New Member

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    What,D'uh?
     
  2. No_Strings

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    Hahaha, cool
     
  3. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Um... is this an example of when someone starts a thread, gets replies on it, then deletes a thread? I'm so confused.
     
  4. Principessa

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    Oops! I dunno what happend? :confused::redface: I'm having trouble posting this afternoon. I keep getting the white screen of death for some reason.

    Pick Your Pink Wisely


    NY Times Blog - October 4, 2007, 6:08 am

    This month, if you buy a Yoplait Yogurt and mail in the pink lid, the company will donate 10 cents to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, a major breast cancer charity. But what if you just donated the value of the 41-cent stamp instead?

    Such are the quandaries for consumers in October, when store shelves are filled with pink products whose sales benefit various breast cancer groups. There are pink bagels at Panera, pink blenders at Linens & Things — and pink ribbons on the box of frozen Green Giant peas I bought for dinner the other night.

    Pink campaigns in stores provide significant amounts of money to breast cancer charities. But just because a product wears pink doesn’t mean that buying it helps fight breast cancer.

    On the ThinkBeforeYouPink Web site, the advocacy group Breast Cancer Action lists six key questions consumers should ask before shopping pink. The site includes a comprehensive list of pink products on offer and points out that pink math doesn’t always make sense — as in the case of the postmarked yogurt lids. Some companies impose limits on donations, the site also notes, or donate only a fraction of the profits to breast cancer groups.

    When shopping pink, do your homework. On the tag or label of the product, look for the name of the organization that will benefit. Anybody can use a pink-ribbon logo, but credible breast cancer charities usually require retail goods associated with their groups to disclose exactly how much of the purchase price is donated. Be wary of products carrying vague promises that a “portion” of proceeds will “help fight breast cancer.”

    Follow directions. Sometimes buying an item isn’t enough to guarantee money to a breast cancer cause. You may also need to mail in a lid, register on a Web site or redeem a coupon to trigger the donation.
    Visit the Web site of the charity you support. Most breast cancer groups provide detailed information about products that support their mission. Below are a few; I’ll update the list as I come across new names.
     
  5. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Thanks. :smile:
     
  6. Not_Punny

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    Oh! I thought this was a thread about how men should select a suitable mate. (Not kidding!)

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    All that aside, thanx qt -- I wasn't aware of this, but I'll watch out! Almost bought some pink just yesterday and it wasn't on the approved list!!! :mad::eek::wink:
     
  7. B_cigarbabe

    B_cigarbabe New Member

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    Ahh,much better now,thanks njqt!
    C.B.:saevilw:
     
  8. yngjock20

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    Wow, that was such an interesting article. We often will attach ourselves to a cause or purchase something to help a certain foundation, but I doubt that most people think about the donation amount next to the amount they give the company to donate "in their honor."

    It would be much more fulfilling (and cost effective) to just donate to that particular foundation (Susan G. Koman, Livestrong...etc.) than buying products that donate a portion of money to the foundation.
     
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