Poor, minority kids twice as likely to have bad math teachers

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. Principessa

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    Report: Poor, minority kids twice as likely to have bad math teachers

    By LIBBY QUAID
    AP Education Writer
    Tuesday, November 25, 2008

    WASHINGTON — Math can be hard enough, but imagine the difficulty when a teacher is just one chapter ahead of the students.

    It happens, and it happens more often to poor and minority students. Those children are about twice as likely to have math teachers who don’t know their subject, according to a report by the Education Trust, a children’s advocacy group.

    Studies show the connection between teachers’ knowledge and student achievement is particularly strong in math.

    “Individual teachers matter a tremendous amount in how much students learn,” said Ross Wiener, who oversees policy issues at the organization.

    The report looked at teachers with neither an academic major nor certification in the subjects they teach.

    Among the findings, which were based on Education Department data:
    • In high-poverty schools, two in five math classes have teachers without a college major or certification in math.
    • In schools with a greater share of African-American and Latino children, nearly one in three math classes is taught by such a teacher.

    Math is important because it is considered a “gateway” course, one that leads to greater success in college and the workplace. Kids who finish Algebra II in high school are more likely to get bachelor’s degrees. And people with bachelor’s degrees earn substantially more than those with high school diplomas.

    The teaching problem is most acute in the middle grades, 5-8, the report said. That’s a crucial time for math, said Ruth Neild, a research scientist at Johns Hopkins University.

    “This is a time when kids are making a really important transition from arithmetic to mathematics,” Neild said. “It takes careful instruction, and if kids can’t get that, and really get it, they’re not going to succeed in math in high school.”

    Yet it can be tougher to find qualified teachers for middle schools, especially in low-income areas, said Neild, who studied the problem in Philadelphia public schools. She did not work on the Education Trust report.

    Teachers should not be blamed for out-of-field teaching, the report said. It can happen anywhere there is a teacher shortage in a particular discipline. It can also happen where there is no shortage but where school administrators have planned poorly.

    Congress tried to fix the problem in the sweeping 2002 No Child Left Behind Law. The law insisted that all teachers in core academic subjects be “highly qualified” by 2006.

    But the most well-known aspect of No Child Left Behind is its requirement for annual state tests in reading and math, and the penalties it imposes on schools that fail to make progress.

    The teacher requirement is less well-known, and also less onerous. States were allowed to come up with their own definitions of “highly qualified.” As a result, most teachers in the U.S. today are deemed highly qualified.

    When it comes to out-of-field teaching, state officials may be understating the problem, the report said.

    Researchers compared two different sets of Education Department data, reports from state officials and a survey of teachers themselves. Teachers said out-of-field teaching happens far more often than states reported.

    For example, in Georgia in 2004, the state said 95.3 percent of core classes were taught by highly qualified teachers. But Georgia teachers, according to reports, told the federal government in 2004 that 65.1 percent of core classes were taught by someone certified in the subject he or she was teaching. That was the most recent year in which the teacher data was available.

    The report found a similar gap in 16 other states.

    The report also called attention to places where people are trying to fix the problem.

    Boston and Chicago have teacher residency programs much like medical residencies, with aspiring teachers working alongside mentor teachers before they are assigned their own classrooms.

    The University of Texas at Austin, the University of North Carolina system and the university system of Georgia all are trying to develop strong teachers who will teach in local schools.

    Louisiana is overhauling its teacher-preparation programs. And Denver and Guilford County, N.C., schools offer financial incentives to attract the best teachers to schools and subjects that are hard to staff.

    Wiener, the Education Trust official, said teaching is the key to fulfilling the goal of No Child Left Behind — that every student will be able to read and do math on grade level by 2014.

    “We cannot meet our goals for increasing student achievement unless and until we focus on improving teaching quality and the effectiveness of teachers in front of the classroom,” Wiener said.


    On the Net: The Education Trust: www2.edtrust.org/edtrust/
     
  2. Hugh Mann

    Hugh Mann New Member

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    At the sick bed of Cúchulainn
    This is very sad, but not surprising to me. My mom taught in an elementary school whose students were predominantly very poor and black, and the quality of the teachers in general was sickening. They were mostly people who could not hack it in any other major in college, so they just fell into teaching. The students are the ones who suffer from this awful cycle. It disgusts me that such a crucial job seems to have so little importance in our society.
     
  3. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    easy enough to solve

    don't bear children you cannot afford to educate, and rear appropriately
     
  4. Phil Ayesho

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    Everyone knows that poor people in general and poor children in particular give off a gas that erodes the neuro-circuitry in the brain responsible for higher math functions.

    I feel sorry for those math teachers who have their hard won mathematical skills destroyed by exposure to 30 or more of these gas emiting poor children in a confined classroom space.

    Clearly.. we need research to get to the root cause of this gas, perhaps it is dietary? Will sealing the children in saran wrap minimize the amount of gas?

    No matter what, we must work proactively to prevent the math teachers in poorer communities from being rendered ineffective thru exposure to poor children.
     
  5. B_JasonDawgxxx

    B_JasonDawgxxx New Member

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    America's education system is a fucking joke. We can spend Trillions on a worthless war. But we cant educate americas youth.
     
    #5 B_JasonDawgxxx, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  6. B_cigarbabe

    B_cigarbabe New Member

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    What the fuck does minority children failing math in the city public schools
    have to do with that racist piece of shit you said?
    Almost funny Phil! :rolleyes:
    cigarbabe:saevil:
     
    #6 B_cigarbabe, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  7. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    the article describes the plight of poor (i.e., economically impoverished) kids attending public schools (i.e., situations where the parent does not have enough money, or does not care enough, to fund proper education, hence, the child has to attend public schools, where the problem occurs)


     
    #7 B_Nick4444, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  8. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    I see, Nick. So the fact that I grew up in a wealthy suburb where the property taxes are such that our public schools were well funded means that my parents cared more for me, is that it? Or is it simply the fact that I was just lucky enough not to be raised by minority parents?
     
  9. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    well, Nick

    if you were schooled in a well-funded school, you likely would not have the problem described in the article

    if you, as a would-be parent, have little money, and decide to proceed with bearing child, then it seems obvious that the proper rearing of that child (including the child's education) is not a foremost thought in your mind

    it would seem to me, that if you do give some thought as to the awesome responsibility that rearing a child is, you would not take it lightly, and would only bring that child into the world if you could properly provide for it

    it is a choice, whether or not you will bear a child
     
  10. Principessa

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    Nick4444, you are a hateful, racist, piece of shit. If you have nothing constructive to say you should just not say anything, :angryfire2:

    Actually the problem stems from the fact so few people are good at math and teaching. Most math majors go into research or the corporate world. The few that do choose to teach elementary or secondary schools are often of a lesser quality.
    Is this your lame attempt at humor? Or are you too showing your true bigoted colors? :mad:

    In New Jersey the urban schools often get as much if not more money than the suburban schools. The state supplements the amount spent per child in these areas as a way of equalizing things. In many instances the urban math and science departments then end up attracting phenomenal teachers.

    How dare you blame parents for working hard at 2 or even 3 jobs to provide a decent life for their children. :mad: No parent wants their child to fail or attend an unsafe school. Blaming them for not being able to afford a private school is ludicrous. Especially since many of the private schools don't even employ certified teachers, just bored housewives. :irked:

    As for your most recent comment this thread is not about eugenics or aborting babies due to socio-economic factors. I strongly suggest you go troll your racist drivel elsewhere. :12:
     
    #10 Principessa, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  11. cocktaste

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    Anyone poor is bound to get a worse education. Not just minority children. Everyone.

    New Jesery public schools are some of the best in the nation.
     
  12. exwhyzee

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    The same is true in my county in North Carolina. For one, schools in low-income neighborhoods are often turned into Magnet Schools with specialties in Math/Science/Performing Arts/Languages - or - the school system will work to advance students into Middle College (a program to increase graduation rates - or - the state will focus additional funding and leadership mentoring on poorly performing schools until they get their testing scores up.

    It does no one good to ignore poorly performing students, and it is in society's best interests to see all student excel. Great post NJ. :smile:
     
  13. D_Marazion Analdouche

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    Where did he say that it was about people of race? There are a lot of "white people" that are poor and fall into this category, far more than people of any other ethnic background.

    By assuming that he's talking about people of a certain race versus an econmic class, makes you the person that is assuming it's all minorities. That screams racism more than someone speaking to an entire class of people based on economic status, does it not?
     
  14. No_Strings

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    I concur.
     
  15. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    First of all, Wartac, the article specifically references African-American and Latino children and I doubt Nick is making the leap to, say, isolated Appalachian children or rural whites in order to stay pc.

    Second, he seems not to realize that most school systems are funded by property taxes and that even when subsidized by state and federal government, huge inequities exist. Moreover, working, payscale and concomitant living conditions in and around those schools often make it impossible to attract anything but mid-level teachers at best.

    And finally, he purports to believe that "proper rearing"--oh, and let's just define that one, shall we?--ought to function as birth control. This last is vile beyond belief.
     
  16. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    whoa, back-off babes, and Nick!

    true, the article focused on impoverished, so-called ethnic & racial minority children, but my observation focused on the poverty aspects, so it meant to address the fact that it was the economics context inter alia that drove the deficiencies in schooling generally (sorry, I don't see anything racist in that, nor do I generally think in racial terms, again, sorry for bursting that bubble)

    in my own life I have seen, and continue to see the differences that obtain between our public and private schools, in the products of those two different school systems

    as Nick8 & EXWHYSEE pointed out, some of our public schools, do in fact, do a good job; that, however, that is not generally the case with public schooling, so that is a general observation, subject to exceptions as any valid generalization

    my point, if anything, is that the good parenting begins with the decision to bear children, that will be provided with the home life that nurtures the sound development of the child's educational, moral, and intellectual life; unfortunately, or otherwise, our civilization is structured on a monetary basis.

    that means, that the initial responsibility begins with the parent, and the decision to become a parent. would it be responsible of me to bring a child into existence if I could not financially provide for it? and that does include consideration of how well that child will be prepared for his future, by either ensuring he will be placed in a good private school or good public school (again, no racial or ethnic context or presupposition there)

    it is in fact, one of the things I think about, when I consider the possibility of bringing a little Nick into the world, whether or not I'm ready and able to do just that.

     
    #16 B_Nick4444, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  17. Phil Ayesho

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    Its called Satire, NJ. the idea being to reveal just how Stupid it sounds to blame the poor for their own situation... as if they somehow 'bring it on themselves'. ( and its "lameness" would really depend on whether you "got" that or not.)


    People born into the middle class always imagine that any success they have is all their OWN doing...

    That THEIR hard working parents pay higher taxers and so THEIR schools are better funded...


    But that is all bullshit. Poverty is crushing in every imaginable way. From the simple fact that better teachers do not want to take jobs in dangerous neighborhoods... and so poor students get shortchanged on education... to the fact that poor neighborhoods do not get the better doctors setting up practice and must make do with doctors for whom the poorer neighborhoods are the only ones that will take them.... shortchanging the poor even when they can afford to seek healthcare with substandard doctors.


    Middle class and affluent people have no real conception how much of what they take for granted about themselves is the result of a very extensive safety net, created and sustained by the affluent, as a means to ENSURE continued affluence for their children.

    If not a scion of the Bush family... G.W. would not have been able to hold onto the management of a McDonalds franchise...

    And the rich jackasses in control of major corporations are as likely to be idiots as any randomly selected group of people... they are GENERALLY not in those positions due to stellar merit... but because of family connections and the frequent opportunities that come from simply BEING in the upper classes... whether you are a dimwit or not.
    Cheney and Rumsfeld were not CEOs because of their business acumen, but because of their rolodexes, and the number of highly placed people who might owe them favors, and for whom they could promise favors.


    But when you are born into a world where nobody you know knows anyone with real power or money... where there are no connections... no networks of successful friends to tap for introductions or job interviews...

    When you are born into that world... it is far harder to overcome than those who start with these things as a matter of course can possibly imagine.


    The middle class often climb the ladder of success... but then, the ladder is right there, close at hand.
    Starting on the first or second floor, they seldom understand the even the lowest rung on that ladder, like a fire escape, is still 20 feet above the heads of the people who live on the street in poverty..
     
    #17 Phil Ayesho, Nov 26, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2008
  18. B_cigarbabe

    B_cigarbabe New Member

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    First,
    Phil I want to thank you for explaining what I and NJ were too pissed off to say.
    My parents had six children and I seriously doubt that for many practicing Catholics thinking about the children's schooling was their first priority in life. They like my parents were busy holding down three jobs and doing the best they could to provide for those children that were conceived in
    love and wanted no matter how little money they had.
    It was not a particularly socially conscious time for parents as it can be now.
    I went to inner city schools where I was allowed to run from classroom to classroom and I was graduated every year because the teachers didn't give two shits about all of us lil' niggers running around. White kids did not enter our schools they didn't have to. In a neighborhood just as poor, white kids had a better class of teachers none of them black I might add even though they were just as poor as we were the schools they went to got better lunches, teachers accreditation and curriculm.
    So please Nick 4444 don't offend us with your ploy of saying it's the parents fault for having us in the first place if they aren't well off and successful.
    You don't have to be rich to want the best your children Nick4444.

    Wartrac and No Strings, You can concur 'til your face is blue but yes he did say something about minorities that
    offends us.
    Nick4444 said "so called ethnic and minority children" that doesn't scream out he is referencing white kids now does it?
    How come you never heard about white kids being bussed to the inner city when I was in school?
    We had to leave our neighborhoods because we couldn't get a decent education. Many black school children were never entered into college bound courses either because we weren't presumed to be smart enough to go anywhere except a vocational trade school.
    This may not be as widespread as when I was in school but it was the norm in the 1960's and into the 1970's in Boston as in many poor black and hispanic neighborhoods.

    cigarbabe:saevil:
     
    #18 B_cigarbabe, Nov 27, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2008
  19. Rikter8

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    I think the article was racially charged from the get go.

    It doesn't matter what color of your skin.
    Simply Put, low income areas will always have poor education due to the simple fact, that the teachers have to accept a low wage since there's no tax money or other funding available for run down schools.
    If the author of this article wanted to target specific groups, he should have gave statistics for ALL groups, and let the reader interpret the way she/he wants.

    Then again.... why go to school? Our Graduates can't get jobs anyway, and playing basketball or rap makes you a multi-millionaire....so where's the incentive to do better?
     
  20. D_Marazion Analdouche

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    BULLSHIT....conforming, toeing the line bullshit. It's not about what class you were born in. My parents collected food stamps, they struggled, we went without. But at the end of each day my mother worked, she still came home and regardless how tired she was she taught me how to cook, do things around the house etc. My father was out the door at 6 in the morning, he came home at 10 at night but still stay with me to watch educational channels, and do my science projects with me.

    They were both determined to make my life better than what they had, that transcends race, status etc. Their parents also worked their asses off, so explain to me how hard work doesn't pay off? How it's always the fault of the class you're born into?

    Poverty transcends race, it's a mentality. You can work your way from any status in this country if you don't make excuses first.


    Really? Is that you in your gallery? Just checking before I go further.
     
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