Poor Social Skills Linked to Mood Disorders?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. Principessa

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    Lately many of our younger members seem to have questions regarding their social skills. Some have issues with anxiety, depression or learning disorders. I saw this article and thought it might be worth posting.

    Youth Social Skills Linked to Mood Disorders

    By: Rick Nauert, Ph.D.
    Senior News Editor

    Reviewed by: John M. Grohol, Psy.D.
    on March 27, 2008


    Thursday, Mar. 27 (Psych Central) -- Researchers have known that children with problems such as anxiety and depression tend to have difficulties forming relationships and being accepted by friends


    Determination if the anxiety and depression lead to the social problems, or if the social challenges precipitated the mental disorders, has remained elusive.


    New research suggests that social problems are more likely to contribute to anxiety and depression than the reverse. The research also shows that this is particularly likely during the transition from adolescence into young adulthood.

    The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Vermont and the University of Minnesota, appears in the March/April 2008 issue of the journal Child Development.
    Using data from Project Competence, which has followed a group of 205 individuals from middle childhood (ages 8 to 12) over 20 years into young adulthood, the researchers used detailed interviews with participants and reports from their parents, teachers, and classmates to create measures of so-called internalizing problems (anxiety, depressed mood, being withdrawn) and social competence (how well one functions in relation to other people, particularly with respect to getting along with others and forming close relationships).

    They then examined how these measures related to each other over time, taking into account the stability of each (in other words, that children who have social problems at the start of the study may continue to have them over time).

    The researchers found that young people who had more internalizing problems (such as anxiety and depression) at the start of the study were more likely to have those problems in adolescence and young adulthood.

    Those who were socially competent at the start of the study were socially competent as they grew up. However, in addition to this evidence of continuity, the study found evidence of spillover effects, where social problems contributed to increasing internalizing symptoms over time.

    Children who were less socially competent in childhood were more likely to have symptoms of anxious or depressed mood in adolescence. Similarly, young people who were less socially competent in adolescence were at greater risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression in young adulthood.

    The findings remained the same when the researchers took into account some other possible explanations, such as intellectual functioning, the quality of parenting, social class, and such problems as fighting, lying, and stealing. And the results were generally the same for both males and females.

    “Overall, our research suggests that social competence, such as acceptance by peers and developing healthy relationships, is a key influence in the development of future internalizing problems such as anxiety and depressed mood, especially over the transition years from adolescence into young adulthood,” explains Keith Burt, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Vermont and the study’s lead author.

    “These results suggest that although internalizing problems have some stability across time, there is also room for intervention and change. More specifically, youth at risk for internalizing problems might benefit from interventions focused on building healthy relationships with peers.”

    The study was funded, in part, by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Mental Health.
     
  2. naughty

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    Well that would clearly make sense to me. I used to wonder if it was a chicken or the egg sort of issue. I remember an article where Jennifer Holiday was reflecting on the suicide of Phyllis Hyman. She stated that she remembered balling up and crying at the height of her career wondering why no one loved her. She said it wasnt until she faced the fact that she suffered from Depression that she realized that her illness was coloring how she viewed the world and her responsibility in the making of her social life. She since has gotten treatment and lost quite a bit of weight and is doing wonderfully. It is a shame that something couldnt have been done for Phyllis before she took her life.
     
  3. Principessa

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    I remember being shocked and amazed when I heard that Phyllis Hyman had committed suicide. Not just because I didn't know she had been battling depression; but because I had always been led to believe Black people don't suffer from depression or commit suicide. Stupid myth I know, but it's not just my family.

    Sadly the stigma of being mentally ill in the Black community is still strong. The fear of being labeled 'crazy' is crippling many people who desparately need help. :frown1:
     
  4. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Mood disorders, personality disorders, mental disorders.. I'd guess so without reading the article.
     
  5. naughty

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    PA,

    Girl! Now you know we just have other names for it. Mental illness is rampant in the Black community. How could it not be? Look at the conditions so many have to live under and tell me how it couldnt be? It is true though that it is a great stigma. Many feel they already have the racial strike against them so they ignore mental illness and just call it "Keeping it real" when they key their ex boyfriend's car or burn his house down. Or want to shoot someone for stepping on their tennis shoes. "Saphire" is nothing more than a clinically depressed black woman who can not afford to stop and get the treatment she needs. SO what does she do? Take it out on the world. IF I hear one more person say that there is no such thing as depression and that it is a weakness the devil or the person is not praying enough I am going to snatch them baldheaded. I will ask them if the devil gave them high blood pressure or diabetes.
     
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