Preventing Parkinsons for dad

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by dibo, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. dibo

    dibo New Member

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    My dad is starting to show beginning signs of parkinsons. Fingers moving on their own etc .. He is only 54. But parkinsons is heavy in our family -2 of his sisters passed from that.

    Can anyone recommend some supplements / medicines or new technology,or research that might help to prevent with that?
     
  2. D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead

    D_Chaumbrelayne_Copprehead Account Disabled

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    Oh, man, that's sad. I don't have any experience with Parkinson's but I'm sorry to hear the news and sending love and light to your dad and your family.
     
  3. helgaleena

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    There's a lot of online info that can help relieve the symptoms, but sorry debo, it won't cure it. You must have heard about Michael J Fox getting it and going public with it... Nutritional supplements will be aimed at strengthening the nerves. Eat nutritional yeast, mushrooms, liver, parsley, things with lots of mineral and trace elements. If he has a fondness for a certain spice indulge it, as manyspices have medicinal value. Liquid oils and fish oil are important for the nerves too.

    Massage and chiropractic help the body maintain circulation and connection to counteract muscular spasming that may mess up the body's alignment.

    That is all I know personally.
     
  4. nudeyorker

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    I'm very sorry to hear about your father. A friend of mine recommends creatine to help slow the progression of parkinson's in addition to vitamin E. I would suggest your father talk to his primary care physician and a nutritionist.
    http://nucare.com/creatanforpa2.html
     
  5. rbkwp

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    Thats really Sad
    at age 54 ...geeeeeeee incredible
    Know it matey
    as far as Health concerns go,am always thinking the best for persons afflicted
    ALL the BEST to yourself and families
    enz

    no suggestions re such..sorry'
     
  6. Dave NoCal

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    Has Lyme disease been definitively ruled out? There can be some commonality of symptoms. It's FAR more treatable.
    Dave
     
  7. Principessa

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    Damn! :frown1: I feel for you dude. My dad is 81 and has Parkinson's Disease. It was diagnosed maybe 5 years ago.

    At what age did his sisters pass away?

    From the minimal research I have done, it seems people who acquire the disease at an early age, like your dad have a longer life expectancy than those who get it later in life, like my dad. :redface:

    This is a weird question; but how is your dads sense of smell? I read an article in a paper published by the Emory University Hospital Neurology Department a few months ago, and apparently decrease or loss of sense of smell is an early indicator of Parkinson's. This often occurs as much as a decade before a tremor is noticeable. :eek: My dad lost his sense of smell in his 50's. Parkinson's does not run in his family. He's the first. :frown1::mad: My father's Parkinson's is probably as a result of over exposure to chlordane.




    Can Scientists Predict or Prevent Parkinson's Disease?
    In most cases, there is no way to predict or prevent sporadic PD. However, researchers are looking for a biomarker — a biochemical abnormality that all patients with PD might share — that could be picked up by screening techniques or by a simple chemical test given to people who do not have any parkinsonian symptoms. This could help doctors identify people at risk of the disease. It also might allow them to find treatments that will stop the disease process in the early stages.

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning may lead to important advances in our knowledge about PD. PET scans of the brain produce pictures of chemical changes as they occur. Using PET, research scientists can study the brain's dopamine receptors (the sites on nerve cells that bind with dopamine) to determine if the loss of dopamine activity follows or precedes degeneration of the neurons that make this chemical. This information could help scientists better understand the disease process and may potentially lead to improved treatments.

    In rare cases, where people have a clearly inherited form of PD, researchers can test for known gene mutations as a way of determining an individual's risk of the disease. However, this genetic testing can have far-reaching implications and people should carefully consider whether they want to know the results of such tests. Genetic testing is currently available only as a part of research studies.
     
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