Prostate Cancer Cure?

Discussion in 'The Healthy Penis' started by D_Pubert Stabbingpain, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. D_Pubert Stabbingpain

    D_Pubert Stabbingpain Account Disabled

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  2. Rubenesque

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    Well I'll be keeping my fingers crossed because my Dad was diagnosed with prostate cancer last year and cannot stand the thought of him suffering ever. His cancer is being controlled (so far successfully) with hormone therapy, but I pray for a complete cure one day!
     
  3. D_Pubert Stabbingpain

    D_Pubert Stabbingpain Account Disabled

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    It seems this may be a cure for those whose cancer does not respond to hormone therapy.

    I don't have cancer but I have always been interested in cures for male-specific issues and anything that allows a man to keep his masculinity, i.e., Testosterone and/or no surgery, while at the same time producing a cure, I am all for.

    Best wished for your dad!
    :smile:
     
  4. FuzzyKen

    FuzzyKen New Member

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    Having lost my Stepfather (an MD) to this and coming from a medical family, adenocarcinoma is a personal thing for me. Adenocarcinomas are all kinds of hormone dependent tumors and include testicular, breast, prostatic, uterine and ovarian cancer in both men and women depending on which organs they have.

    What saddens me is that the news media tends to release false hope. They release this false hope too quickly and people as a result of it end up choosing treatment options that are not yet proven or are still under research.

    I had an Uncle through marrige who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in his early 50's. The news media released information on a treatment called "particle beam" which is a specific focused type of radiation therapy involving no surgery. The track record on "particle beam" became very questionable after five years. It did not prove out in the long term as being a really great option. Radiation without surgery has so far cost me 2 relatives through marriage and seven friends. All of these men were told that radiation without surgery was a great alternative and had a great track record. In view of the number of people I have lost as friends and relatives choosing radiation based treatments the physican reporting appears to be questionable.

    New chemotheraputic agents are born every day, but until these agents are tested and the track record of their effectiveness is at least 10-years-old, there is no real accurate accounting. A percentage survive and a percentage have a reoccurance within 5 years. The idea is to stack the odds in the favor of the patient and against the cancer.

    The ONLY effective treatment for prostate cancer is to have regular examinations and testing including both PSA tests. PSA is prostate specific antigen. The idea is to catch this one very early.

    I have also seen the track record of a radical prostatectomy done very early and the greatest percentage of those people seem to still be hanging around.

    Hormone therapy is in fact "anti-hormone" therapy. What is done is a combination of drugs are administered to completely stop all testosterone production in males and all estrogen production in females. In essence chemical castration. Genetically male adenocarcinoma is not cured, but the replication of the cancer cells can be slowed to a crawl in a zero testosterone / high estrogen environment. In women, the same is true in reverse. Female adenocarcinoma does very poorly and genetically slows cell reproduction to a crawl in a high testosterone low estrogen environment. At best however this is a therapy normally associated with a patient considered to have experienced metastases or spreading of the disease outside the prostatic capsule. It is not a cure and is not in the best of circumstances in and of itself really even a remission. In some, this will be done secondary to a radical prostatectomy which is a surgical excision of the prostate and surrounding tissue. the anti-hormone therapy has a great record of extending the productive life of the individual and giving them sometimes extends that life by many years. The reverse hormone environment for a gender will not eliminate the cancer, but it will shrink the tumors and often, but not always slow cell replication down to a snails pace.

    If the pradical prostatectomey surgery is well done, a percentage of men can have sexual experiences with the use of injectable erection agents. Those who have the best surgeons who can leave nerve function as undisturbed as possible will still be able to enjoy sensation.. The key is to catch this very kind of cancer very early.



     
  5. D_Pubert Stabbingpain

    D_Pubert Stabbingpain Account Disabled

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    That is why I provided the link to the company that today announced their successful 3rd stage trials and expect and FDA decision by the end of this year so everyone could decide for themself. I feel this type of "news" is a good source of hope.

    I am sorry to hear of your losses.



    PSA has always been controversial as a single indicator due to the chances of as many false positives as false negatives for many years:
    From the Congress of the American Cancer Society held in Phoenix from 10/03/97:
    CONCLUSIONS. Substantial regional variations in incidence were found, but regional mortality rates were similar. This is evidence that screening and early detection efforts are resulting in the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma in some men who do not need therapy; thus, prostate carcinoma screening can lead to unnecessary treatment for such men. Furthermore, epidemiologic data do not demonstrate that screening is decreasing mortality. The benefits of screening and early detection, although theoretically possible, are yet unproven, whereas the risks and harms of screening and resultant treatment are definite.

    The "Gold Standard" of DRE being a more reliable test but there is no way a doctor can feel the entire prostate so it too is lacking. Many doctors fail to advise men in advance to not ejaculate 2-3 days prior to a PSA test and that causes false positives as does prostatitis. Instead of immediately scheduling a biopsy (that, IMO, can be dangerous in itself as it can cause an immediate spreading of some types of cancer), the patient should be informed to take another PSA, and probably a third as well as getting another DRE and from a second and possibly third doctor's opinion.

    Here is the latest on 2 extremely large studies about the false positives from PSA tests and a general guideline for using them:
    http://www.bendweekly.com/news/17470.html

    My intention is not to argue with you here but to merely look at other parts of the equation. The question is, given the usual slow-growth record of prostate cancer, how many of them will still be hanging around even without a radical prostatectomy? How many of them unnecessarily underwent the procedure due to a false positive or too little medical advice? There probably is no way to truly know that without the studies I list here as well as others and I have no doubt that someone will step forward and find flaws in almost every study so the patient must make the final decision. I guess my issue is more with some doctors who don't keep up with the latest literature in favor of depending on their own experience and/or preference.



    Exactly! And chemical castration is more radical than just cutting off a man's nuts because testosterone, in much smaller doses, is also produced elsewhere in a man's body. Depending on the age of the patient and their generally-expected life expectancy, I am sure that many (especially gay) men, if truly given all the options and risks thereof, would prefer to live a shorter, higher-quality life. True, sex is not everything, especially in light of family and friends but, you really have to take everything into consideration before agreeing to put yourself as well as your families (because, afterall, you will be more sick in in many more ways, than with the prostate cancer alone), not to mention the financial burden as you hand over tons of money to the medical community. I think that a very young man would have a lot more to lose.


    But what of the *quality* of their lives? If I am going to take on all the typical symptoms of a man with low or no testosterone and start having hot flashes and grow man boobs and any other side effect of taking female hormones, I will pass and take my chances with a shorter life, but that is just me.

    Here it sounds like you are talking about TURP instead of a total radical prostatectomy. With the later, there will be no prostate, the nerves in and around the prostate will be gone and although a man may still be able to experience the build-up to orgasm, it certainly can't be as fulfilling as also having the second stage of a man's orgasm as ejaculation will be impossible. I would like to know exactly what percentage of men have a satsifactory sexual experience after undergoing a radical prostatectomy and who are also taking chemical castration drugs.

    Here is another article on promising drugs that I found today and I would be interested in your opinion as to whether or not you consider it a "hopeful" option:
    New Drug Shows Promise In Treating Drug-resistant Prostate Cancer

    I would like to see the specific results of the PSA studies. E.G., actual PSA readings. My PSA has steadily increased, year to year, by just tenths of a point and since I started taking DIM that has decreased my E2 allowing for more Total Testosterone to get to the T receptors and providing for more Free T, my T levels are now high normal instead of low and I am curious as to how my next PSA looks but unemployment and economics are delaying my getting a blood workup at this time.
     
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