Question for the muscular folk of lpsg

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Gecko4lif, May 18, 2010.

  1. Gecko4lif

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    I have started working out and I need to up my calorie intake but Im not sure what to eat.

    What is the most calorie dense thing I should eat?
     
  2. scotchirish

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    you need to look at a lot more than just calories. there are good calories and empty calories. protein is always good because your body has to work harder to process it and it's essential to build muscle.

    if you're looking to loose weight, one fitness technique that is often overlooked is using muscle to burn fat. build up your legs and core muscles, they will continue to burn away calories even while you're not working out. also cardio, but don't go longer than about 30 min at a time or your body will use muscle for fuel instead of fat.

    for building mass, protein is best as well as cycling what types of exercises you are doing. when you're first starting just do light weights and focus on your form, once you get muscle memory on the proper form you can really bump up the weight and make serious gains.

    eat within 15 min of weights workouts and after 15 min but within an hour of a cardio.
     
  3. invisibleman

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    You should eat more fresh protein: fish and chicken.
    Brown rice and vegetables.
    Fresh fruit.
    Cook with canola oil or extra virgin olive oil, if possible.

    Avoid sugar and processed foods.

    Eat six smaller meals throughout the day.


     
  4. scotchirish

    scotchirish Member

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    also take supplements, with our food distribution system, most foods loose their nutritional value long before you eat them. If you don't get fresh foods within the first week off the tree/vine, you're better off eating frozen foods.
     
  5. pwrdick

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    Konichiwa Goziamas,

    ScotchIrish is spot on.

    I was required at one point to also boost my caloric intake and build muscle mass. Here are some nutritional guidelines that my nutritionist gave me back then:

    Supplement with the amino acid creatine. But watch how your body responds to it - there can be side effects (like cramping and diahrrea). I just googled muscle building amino acids and they now recommend additional supplements. But I know the creatine made a big difference for me back then.
    Protein is a great addition to your overall diet, boost up your intake of high protein foods (lean meats, beans), especially around the workout period, reduce your intake of plain starches. I never reduced my fat - I needed all the calories I could to put on the 30 pounds I had lost to wasting.
    Sometimes high protein diets do not have enough fiber so maintain good vegetable intake that is high in fiber
    Insure adequate water intake - hydration is vital
    My nutritionist actually forbid me from running, swimming or other simlar excercise until I had increased my mass to a specific goal.

    Some other tips:
    Have a body mass index done now to give yourself a baseline. Look at your lean body mass. Then chart it to measure your progress over a month to month basis. You want to make sure your lean body mass increases - that is the most important measurement as your weight may stay the same for a long while (or even drop initially)
    Have your doctor check you out to make sure your are in in good enough shape to start a rigorous regime. In addition, have your testosterone level checked to make sure you are in the 'normal' range. Do NOT take testosterone beyond what is required to be within normal parameters.
    Weight lifting is by far the best way to build mass, but I LOVE the slow approach to weight lifting. It will involve lighter weights, fewer reps but will really stress your muscles fast. The bonus is less time in the gym. For example, for bicep curls, instead of just going for maximum weight lifted, go instead to curling a lighter weight BUT do it slowly, counting to 15 on going up and 15 going down. Repeat 6-8 times. If you can't do that many, lighten up. If you still have reserve, then increase in two days when you go at it again.
    Form is vital. Have a trainer check to make sure you are using good form so as to lesson the chance of injury.
    Do not overwork - your muscles will not grow unless you give them a day or two off. If you really feel determined, work one muscles group one day, move to a different group the next day, day of rest then repeat.
    Keep your muscles guessing. After a while, change your regime to force your muscles to adapt to a different type of weight-bearing workout.

    Lean body mass definately increases your caloric requirements, as ScotchIrish notes. I have to eat quite a bit now to maintain weight even though I really don't work out any more. My muscles from that program 7 years ago just stayed with me, and they demand calories. I have kept on the higher protein diet overall (although I only used the carotene for a short period).

    Hope this is helpful and good luck!
     
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