Rabbit

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by DaveyR, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11,908
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Who has a good recipe for cooking rabbit please? My Mother gave us one today she bought us from the loacl butcher and we haven't a clue what to do with it. Neither of us have cooked one before. I ate rabbit quite a lot when we lived in Tenerife and it always seemed to be served in a sauce of some description.
     
  2. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,317
    Likes Received:
    8
    I mentioned it elsewhere ;)

    Southern Italians sometimes cook it over a low heat in a casserole, in olive oil, garlic, white wine, tomatoes, black olives, and sage. With sauteed potatoes it's a winner.
     
  3. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11,908
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Cheers H. I'll bring the rabbit and booze you show me how to cook it. Deal?
     
  4. nudeyorker

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    42,918
    Likes Received:
    38
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    NYC/Honolulu
    I believe I posted a recipe in the *Recipes* thread. Let me look for it.
     
  5. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,317
    Likes Received:
    8

    Abso-fucking-lutely! :biggrin1:
     
  6. B_prettyswinggirl

    B_prettyswinggirl New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    438
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Southern California
    I start with lightly flouring the pieces of rabbit in seasoned flour. Saute in olive oil till lightly browned then take out and set aside. To the left over olive oil add diced onions, celery, carrots,(about a cup of each) and enough flour to coat the veggies and keep stirring over med heat till the veggies start to soften. place the rabbit back in and add either veggie stock or a good white wine. Just enough to cover the rabbit and place a lid and let simmer over low heat for about an hour. Serve with crusty french bread and season with salt and pepper to taste. Always delicious!
     
    #6 B_prettyswinggirl, Feb 6, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2011
  7. chicagosam

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    15,030
    Likes Received:
    761
  8. B_subgirrl

    B_subgirrl New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    9,873
    Likes Received:
    11
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    Be careful with the salt! Rabbit is salty enough on its own and doesn't need help.
     
  9. luka82

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    somewhere
    CS I find rabbit meat to be really dry! So, what I suggest is cooking it on low heat for quite a long time, until the meat starts coming off bones on itself.
    This is how I would do it:
    1 rabbit in piaces
    2-3 medium onions, chopped
    3-4 garlic cloves, chopped
    3-4 carrots, chopped
    1 medium cellery, chopped
    1 cup of home made tomato juice
    1 cup of read wine
    1/2 of cup chicken bouillon
    Lots of parsey-chopped (fresh basil is a plus, if u like)
    Fry the rabbit piaces on high heat, just to get the colour out, take it out and saute the vegetables in the same oil (I find grape seed oil best for this, but you can use any). Put the rabbit with your vegetables, add the liquids and cook it for at least 2 hours(I cook it for about three), but you have to check on it. Add, slat, pepper and lots of paprika!
    Make some palnta as a side dish, and enjoy!
     
  10. payaso69

    payaso69 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    1
    RABBIT? whaT?! never had it, is it good?
     
  11. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,317
    Likes Received:
    8

    Also added to this there are other considerations with Rabbit IMO. Rabbit is extremely lean, which means you should add slightly more fat (butter or oil or whatever you're using) than you would with other fattier meats.

    I also think Rabbit tastes different at different times of year and depending on the age of the Rabbit. Unlike other commonly eaten wild mammals (Hares or Deer for instance) Rabbits don't have a mating season, but as with Hare or Venison when they are caught in season the meat can taste what I describe as "Hormonal", it isn't a strong flavour, if it is a flavour at all (I have a feeling the brain recognises it as a smell or taste even though it's probably not sensory information at all), and it isn't unpleasant per se, but can be slightly off-putting to some, even if they can't put their finger on exactly what it was that put them off. I think younger Rabbit, that is not young enough to still be a baby but not old enough to have had lots of offsrpring tends to "taste" of this less. But with Rabbits that golden age is so short and so fleeting that it's uncommon to have wild Rabbit which actually is that age and normally only farmed Rabbit can be killed at that exact point to make sure.

    I think the best way to counter this is to cook Rabbit as gently and slowly as possible and be sure to include something acidic in the recipe, wine, lemon juice etc. Slow gentle cooking also has the benefit of keeping the meat in good condition for the plate as it can be delicate sometimes and more vigorous cooking can break it down too much.

    Overall anything which goes with chicken or pork will likely go well with Rabbit, and in many ways it's really just another form of white meat. I tend to think white wine is better with Rabbit than red, both for cooking and to drink with it.
     
  12. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11,908
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Northumberland
    Thanks guys I will let you know on Wednesday eveing how it is. I'll pick one of your ideas and it'll go in the slow cooker all day.
     
  13. ManofThunder

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,999
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1,296
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Verified:
    Photo
    Since joining this forum, I have discovered that I haven't tried what most have. Tea, coffee, bacon sandwich etc. Now I find that all of you have ate rabbit?! I have always seen rabbits as something to cuddle personally, but for the first time I wonder what they taste like.
     
  14. D_Tim McGnaw

    D_Tim McGnaw Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,317
    Likes Received:
    8

    Rabbit tastes vaguely like poultry, but it's stronger and more meaty. Mind you it's not majorly strong, but it is very succulent and can have the taste of the herbs and plants it's fed on.
     
    #14 D_Tim McGnaw, Feb 7, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2011
  15. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11,908
    Likes Received:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Northumberland
    I would liken it to a cross between pork and chicken.
     
  16. ManofThunder

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,999
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1,296
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Verified:
    Photo
    Thank you both! I think I will try it sometime. *Adds rabbit to list of things to try*
     
  17. vince

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Messages:
    14,785
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    540
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Asia
    You live in the UK and you have never tried tea? Pardon, but I'm curious about how that could happen.
     
  18. ManofThunder

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,999
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1,296
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    Verified:
    Photo
    I know, I know...I'm a living symbol of shame to the people of Britain...I have been told by a member that green tea is very nice though, so that is on my list of things to try before I die. Tea has never passed my lips but it will before too long!
     
  19. B_subgirrl

    B_subgirrl New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    9,873
    Likes Received:
    11
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    NSW, Australia
    You've never had a bacon sandwich?!? Where are you living - under a rock? :tongue: Aussies add BBQ sauce to bacon (and egg) sandwiches, if you wish to try them the Aussie way.

    I agree that rabbits are wonderful to cuddle, but they're also great to eat!
     
  20. wallaboi

    Verified Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Messages:
    452
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    56
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rainforest dweller
    Verified:
    Photo
    Well, the Chinese new year has recently been celebrated, and 2011 is the year of the rabbit. I cannot remember ever seeing rabbit on the menu at a Chinese restaurant. Does anybody have a recipie for an Oriental or Asian style rabbit?
     
Draft saved Draft deleted