Rabies question?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by D_Roderick Beresford Stiffington IV, Sep 27, 2007.

  1. D_Roderick Beresford Stiffington IV

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    So...I was drunk last night and while walking home a nice orange looking cat that approached me. Yes, I was very stupid and drunk but I started petting it. It was behaving exactly like my cat, walking inbetween my legs and pushing its face up against my hand which is exactly what my cat does. Also when I pull my hand away from my cat she will playfully swing her paw at me. When I pulled my hand away from this cat it lightly/playfully bit my arm. It didn't hurt at all and it didn't pierce the skin at all, but obviously today more sober I began to freak out anyway.

    I can't recall if it had any tags on it if it was domesticated or just a wild cat, but there's also a lot of racoons in my area...and a friend of mine was saying while most cats in the US aren't carriers, its always possible a racoon fought with a cat giving it to them. I'm going to go to the doctor tomorrow just incase, but I'm still freaking out. From what I'm reading, if an animal is a carrier, its saliva would have to come into contact with an open wound, or your eyes or something. I'm wondering if it was even possible for the virus, if it had it, to be transmitted by the "playful bite" which did not go through my skin.
     
  2. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Next to impossible I'd say.

    If there are no marks on your arm and the skin wasn't broken, I wouldn't worry about it.

    There's not much a doctor can do besides give you rabies shots, which aren't as awful as they used to be. Still, this is chat forum medical advice and probably only worth the pixels its posted on so go anyway.
     
  3. snoozan

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    you're probably fine. if it didn't pierce the skin, i wouldn't worry. going to your doc will probably ease your fears, though, and i think it's a great idea.

    let us know how it goes.
     
  4. Jovial

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    Ask the doc. If in the off chance you have it and wait until you have symptoms, it will be too late. Maybe you should get immunized anyway, so you can pet cats and racoons whenever you get drunk in the future. :biggrin1:
     
  5. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    No the cat would probably be trying to attack you.. not play with you. Char you are bad lol play with random cats.
     
  6. snoozan

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    actually rabid animals can be unusually friendly and/or viscious. it's a really weird disease that way.
     
  7. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Rabies is surprisingly rare. In fact, most vets haven't even seen an animal with rabies. While it's possible, it's highly unlikely.
     
  8. sargon20

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    Scratches have been known to transmit the virus. I would speak to a doctor ASAP. Indeed rabies is rare but it is not to be taken lightly especially with a stray animal.
     
  9. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Wait? Aren't people regularly vaccinated for rabies? I think every 10 years you get it here.
     
  10. Osiris

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    I honestly can't remember for adults, but I think all the kids got a rabies shot this year with their school physicals.
     
  11. DC_DEEP

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    I've never heard of that. Tetanus, maybe, but not rabies.
     
  12. Dave NoCal

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    It's highly improbable but... You only get one chance to stop it and it's uniformly fatal.

    I was scratched by a stray dog last year and, although the possibility was remote, I went ahead and got rabies shots. They weren't bad at all. The actual vaccinations are like a flu shot, small, virtually painless, and given in the deltoid. It's a series of shots given at increasing intervals (3 days, 5 days, 9 days...). The standard protocol is that, at the time of the first vaccination, you are also given a good dose of rabies immune globulin to give your body some immedate fight. It's about five ml. per 75 pounds of body weight, given in the butt. They don't like to give more than 5 ml at a single site so, at 150 punds, I got one in each cheek. They didn't hurt or sting much at the time and I had virtually no soreness afterward. In the event of a future exposure, all I'll need is a booster. There is rabies in this county, especially in bats, so that's good to know.

    The shots are NOTHING, my friend. I would not take the chance.

    Dave
     
  13. john7664

    john7664 New Member

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    I wouldn't worry at all like the man said if there are no wounds etc in the area you are clear
     
  14. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Tetanus! Thats the one. Although I'm sure my mom got the rabies vaccine after a random wild cat bit her (not my Charlie cat)
     
  15. DC_DEEP

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    Except for the cost!:eek:
     
  16. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Yeah I've been keeping that in mind when I speak to the American citizens. I never think twice about the cost of drugs or anything, just the $1.49 it costs to fill the prescription.
     
  17. Scorpiorising

    Scorpiorising New Member

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    One of our cats was bitten by a rabid raccoon one time. My mother and step father took the cat inside and washed his wound before taking him to the vet. Of course, the cat was fine because of the rabies shots, but I think he needed a booster.

    Well, because they didn't wear gloves while cleaning the cat, my mother and step father were urged to go to the emergency room and get rabies shots. They didn't have any cuts to speak of; it was just a good precaution. And, the shots weren't that bad, from what I hear. Well, my step father is a large man, so he did have to get stuck several times each visit. And, remember, you do have to stay on schedule. I'm under the impression that the first shot is a live virus, but I may be wrong. In any even, because they didn't have the inocculate availabe when they first went in, the nurses warned them to get back by a certain date and to NOT miss it.

    As for rabies being rare . . . I think that depends on where you live. On the East Coast, U.S. we do have summers where there are a lot of rabid animals. I think very hot summers are indicative of a rise in rabies, but don't quote me. In some areas it may be more rare.
     
  18. Dave NoCal

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    My health insurance covered most of the cost. It may be that in some states public health will cover it, I don't know.
     
  19. DC_DEEP

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    I've dealt with some pricey meds before (Imitrex comes to mind) and I worked for a time in a medical university's college of pharmacy, so I understand that some drugs a expensive.

    About a year ago, a friend of mine was, through a bizarre series of events, bitten by a bat. Of course, he went through the rabies series. He does have health & pharmacy insurance. I don't remember if his insurance didn't pay, or if they only paid a limited amount, or what, but when he told me how much it cost, I just almost shit. I could not believe it. Maybe he paid out of pocket and got reimbursed, but I do remember thinking "I hope you don't have to take out a second mortgage to pay for it!" I was honestly and truly shocked.
     
  20. Dave NoCal

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    I think the total cost was about $1500 and it wound up costing me about $400. It's a lot of money and comes down to how much risk is acceptable when, if you bet wrong, the outcome is a certain and messy death. Around here, because there have been human rabies deaths, they will give you the shots if you wake up with a bat in the room. Apparently their teeth are so small that you can't see a bite mark. Likewise, if one touches you, it's shots time.
    Dave
     
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