Reagan on the U.S. 10 Bill?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by MisterMark, Jun 8, 2004.

  1. MisterMark

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    If the conservatives are trying to drive the liberals nuts, they're doing a great job.

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    Monetary memorial? That's the $10 question
    By Susan Page, USA TODAY


    WASHINGTON — Former president Ronald Reagan's name has been enshrined on everything from an airport outside Washington to a turnpike in Florida to a mountain in New Hampshire. Now his most fervent fans have a new memorial in mind: the $10 bill.

    Once Reagan's body has been interred on Friday, leaders of the Ronald Reagan Legacy Project will launch a campaign in Congress to put Reagan's visage in the space now occupied by founding father Alexander Hamilton.

    "Hamilton was a nice guy and everything, but he wasn't president," says Grover Norquist, who heads the legacy project as well as an influential conservative group called Americans for Tax Reform. "As a board member of the (National Rifle Association), I can also tell you that he was a bad shot."

    Hamilton may be remembered most for a fight he lost - a duel of honor against Vice President Aaron Burr in 1804 that left him fatally wounded. But Hamilton was also a Revolutionary War hero, George Washington's chief of staff, an author of the Federalist Papers and a Treasury secretary who created many of the financial and economic systems that survive today.

    Unlike Reagan, however, Hamilton lacks a modern-day political constituency - one reason that the $10 bill is being targeted. The Federalist Party that Hamilton helped forge is defunct. The Republican Party that Reagan helped restore to power now controls the White House, the Senate and the House of Representatives.

    Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell, who as majority whip is the No. 2-ranking Republican in the Senate, says he'll sponsor the proposal when the time is right. Robert Stevenson, a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., says "there could be a head of steam" behind the idea, especially right after Reagan's death.

    Democrats aren't quite ready to embrace the idea. "Ronald Reagan did many things during his presidency that deserve to be remembered," says Todd Webster, a spokesman for Senate Democratic leader Tom Daschle, "and Democrats and Republicans will discuss how best to honor his legacy."

    If Democrats stall, Norquist says the group has a fallback: the dime. The Bush administration would be urged to take the less controversial step of putting Reagan's face on half the dimes minted. Franklin Roosevelt, who now has the dime to himself, would be featured on the other half. The idea of replacing FDR entirely had enough opposition - even from Nancy Reagan - that the group scaled back a bit.

    The Reagan Legacy Project is accustomed to uphill struggles. Its first victory, in 1998, came after a bitter battle to rename Washington's National Airport. Since then, it has sought to get something named after Reagan - a school, a highway, an aircraft carrier - in every state, every county and each of the formerly communist nations of the world.

    By law, decisions on the currency are up to the Treasury secretary - that is, to Hamilton's successors. Anne Womack Kolton, a spokeswoman for the current occupant of that job, John Snow, says any discussion of changing currency is "premature." But Norquist reports that he already has met with Snow and senior White House officials. "Everybody thought it was a good idea, and nobody thought it was a bad idea," he says, although no commitments were made.

    There is at least one person who thinks it's a bad idea. Ron Chernow, author of Alexander Hamilton, an acclaimed biography published this spring, protests that the proposal to bump Hamilton off the $10 bill would rob an overlooked patriot of a well-deserved honor.

    "I hope the country finds a suitable way to commemorate Ronald Reagan, but I don't think it would be appropriate to do it by downgrading Alexander Hamilton, who has suffered from too much historical neglect, and who is finally and belatedly starting to be appreciated by posterity," Chernow says. Even Reagan might have objected, he suggests: "Hamilton was the prophet of the capitalist system that Ronald Reagan so admired."

    The timing is ironic, he says. The 200th anniversary of the duel in Weehawken, N.J., that cost Hamilton his life is July 11. "A lot of Hamilton admirers felt the time had come to do justice to his memory."
     
  2. Miniverch

    Miniverch New Member

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    Grant is on the $50 and he led a very corrupt Administration (for all he did to end the Civil War); Andrew Jackson, the "president of the common man," had little concern for men (or women or children) of the Native American variety and forcibly removed those few remaining in the Eastern States via the infamous trail of tears; Reagan on the $10 wouldn't surprise me too much.
     
  3. KinkGuy

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    It won't be that hard to go through the rest of my life without ever exchanging a ten dollar bill. OR...we could "damage" them by the hundreds of thousands so the banks would be turning them in to the Federal Reserve...think anyone would get the point? Nah, I guess not. :angry:
     
  4. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Nope.

    The ink isn't even dry on the last incarnation of the $10 bill yet.

    I don't think we should have people on the bills anyway; it's not P.C. enough.

    Maybe historic sites, national park vistas, portable toilets.

    As much as I admire the man, Mr. Reagan isn't dead enough to put on money. Wait 50 years and see how we feel then.
     
  5. jonb

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    Jackson also opposed a federal bank, so him being on the $20 is pretty crazy. Actually, Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, and Grant were all just as bad to Indians. Thankfully, most Lakota don't ever see a fifty, so we don't get reminded of him as much. BTW, most of us just use Indian. Or "Indian with a feather" in the city.

    Reagan recently died, so he can be legally put on money. They're also trying to put him on the dime. Oh, and if you're interested, all US coins are made of a copper/nickel alloy except for the penny, which is made of copper-plated zinc; and the Sacajawea dollar, which is made of magnesium.

    And for reference, Grant didn't end the Civil War as a president; his election ended Reconstruction.
     
  6. Miniverch

    Miniverch New Member

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    hey jon,

    re: Grant ending Civil War. I just meant his generalship having to do with that. Very open to debate of course ...
     
  7. BobLeeSwagger

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    Half true. Grant became president about four years after the Civil War ended, but Reconstruction (depending on how you define it) continued for years longer. Most historians define it as ending with the controversial deal that resolved the election of 1876. Republican Rutherford Hayes became president in exchange for removing the last federal troops from the South and neglecting the enforcement of civil rights laws.

    In a literal sense, reconstructing the South took years longer. And of course, there are the psychological scars.

    Bonus trivia: Hayes was a decorated Civil War general too.
     
  8. Miniverch

    Miniverch New Member

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    Did y'all know that U.S. Grant owned a slave (a personal man servant) in his youth?

    Anyway, my friend posted this on another list about the prospect of Reagan appearing on the $20 bill. My friend's of African American heritage, btw (and Indian -- I don't know Jon, if I don't say "Native American" how do people know I'm not meaning Indian from India??? Quess I could specify Indian with a feather ... eh?:)

    From Roland, my DC bud:

    "I've been thinking about this too, how angry I've been about Republicans in general, and Reagan in particular. All through my childhood, I somehow felt distinctly left out of the republican dominated culture of the time. I then heard many family members bitterly decrying the uncaring and extremely racist policies of the administration, how Reagan's support of the rich and complete disregard for the poor and for social programs directly oppressed black people. Now I've been reading how he allowed thousands of gay people to die of AIDS and did nothing...

    "Then, this week I learned that some people want to put his face on one of our bills. I was horrified! Then, I reconsidered. I believe I would actually support his face on a $20. Why? The guy who's on there now was a racist mass-murderer. Andrew Jackson was a slave trader, and under his direction, the U.S. conquered and nearly destroyed both the Creek and Cherokee nations, forcing thousands to abdicate their lands and march thousands of miles to prison camp reservations; most died on the way. This cleared the South so that he could encourage squatters to start cotton plantations and import thousands of slaves. I saw an alternative movement online about replacing him with Martin Luther King, but only Presidents go on currency. Reagan's not great, but at last he didn't commit genocide. Well, I guess he did too against gay people, but Andrew Jackson is still much more evil ..."

    Andrew Jackson should not be on one our bills ... George Washington perhaps (who freed his slaves on his death remember -- though his wife, a Lee, did not free hers) ...

    Thomas Jefferson perhaps (who before his death in 1826 was horrified to learn that Jackson was not honoring the treaties Jefferson signed with the Southeastern Indians ... and who had worked very hard to forge a peace with the northwestern Indians through the Lewis and Clark expedition -- most of the men on the Corp of Discovery were of French/Native American mix, btw) ...

    ... But Jackson? We should cringe every time we spend one ... Maybe it would be better to see ol' Ronnie's benign, engaging, handsome, jocular mug ... :wub:
     
  9. jonb

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    The feather/dot thing is actually a pretty common slang anymore.

    Oh, Reagan actually said this at Moscow State university:

    "Let me tell you just a little something about the American Indian in our land. We have provided millions of acres of land for what are called preservations - or reservations, I should say. They, from the beginning, announced that they wanted to maintain their way of life, as they had always lived there in the desert and the plains and so forth. And we set up these reservations so they could, and have a Bureau of Indian Affairs to help take care of them. At the same time, we provide education for them - schools on the reservations. And they re free also to leave the reservations and be American citizens among the rest of us, and many do. Some still prefer, however, that way - that early way of life. And we've done everything we can to meet their demands as to how they want to live. Maybe we made a mistake. Maybe we should not have humored them in that wanting to stay in that kind of primitive lifestyle. Maybe we should have said, no, come join us; be citizens along with the rest of us."

    Honestly, the only two countries to successfully deny genocide are the US and Turkey. (The Turks steadfastly deny what they did to Armenians during WWI.)
     
  10. jonb

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    Oh, yeah, I wanted to add: Liberals can be just as arrogant, I've found. This one guy on one newsgroup I'm on compared the Cherokee not recognizing a lesbian marriage to the Trail of Tears. (If a gay couple were officially married by a tribal government, the government would be scrambling to take the right of marriage away from us. In fact, Hawaii stopped considering local customs [as required by the state constitution] when it came to marriage because of mahu marriages.) Which means that it's time we expand Godwin because I doubt gay couples are being forced to march hundreds of miles.
     
  11. Miniverch

    Miniverch New Member

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    Oh Jon, yes, so sadly yes ... this following supressed history kills me every waking (and nonwaking) moment of my life:

    My family's quaint little New England town's history is not so quaint after all.

    It was founded by Indian bounty hunters more than 250 years ago (c. 1740). Most of the surrounding towns have similar histories, of course ... These mercenaries were promised 10£ (pounds sterling) for every scalp of an Indian adult male, and 5£ for every scalp of a female or child. Many of the Indians they killed were from peaceful, nonaggressive tribes ... Their bones are buried in the rolling hills around my Mom's house ...

    Of course, it is not common knowledge that Indians learned the heinous scalping process from the white man. It was the easiet way for the bounty hunters to count and prove the total number of people they slaughtered ...

    Anyway, when all was said and done and the men went to collect their money, there was no money for them in the Royal Governor's coiffer (just too many scalps, I suppose), so they were issued huge land tracts instead. Not one of these mercenaries settled and worked the land of the town that became my home. It was sold and passed down to those who are among my very own ancestors ...

    So many times, I look at the landscape (especially when I'm in the wild) and see the masses of white people hiking, boating, camping -- oblivious -- and I imagine mournfully how different it would be if the beautiful, tall, strong North Eastern Indians were still here, walking, living, breathing, talking ... mixing with us to make us stronger ...

    But no ... we are weaker from my ancestors having done what they did ... mentally (from the supressed but due repetance for our ancestors' actions, at the very least) and physically (from our refusal to mix genetically with the people we decided to kill off instead).

    Reagan's speech is sooooooo telling. We forget how he bumbled and stammered and was basically pretty much of a fool, propped up by this harpy wife and the right wing idealogues with whom he surrounded himself ... not unlike Dub-ya, eh? ...

    But they are both OUR president, as was Jackson, as was Grant, as were so many others in the line, practicing and propogandizing this genocide, our deepest, unspoken secret ...

    :( (**anticipating a Republican broadside, but hopeful, and not holding my breath**)
     
  12. Imported

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    wlipman: I've got a better idea, which should satisfy both intelligent people and conservatives alike:

    Put Reagan on the $3.00 bill.
     
  13. Miniverch

    Miniverch New Member

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    :lol:

    hahahahaha! good! that was the kind of broadside i was looking for!
     
  14. Imported

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    BRMSTN69: How about a new coin the 2 cent piece(am I blind or is there not a "cent"key on my computer) that way nobody gets bumped off a bill or coin and republicans can get thier 2 cents worth


    P.S. I'm not a republican or a democrat:I'm a leftist right-winger and a conserative liberal, that means I'm a member of the NRA who supports gay marriage and gays in the military( God its tough being country and queer)
     
  15. jonb

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    I don't think the Republicans will give you a broadside for Jackson; he was a Democrat. (L Frank Baum had the strangest idea about the Indian problem: Since all the strongest Indians had died off, he said that the US should just kill the rest. Obviously America had already differentiated itself from Europe; over in Europe, men like Huxley were arguing that war was like pruning.)

    And no, BRMSTN, you're not blind: The cent sign on typewriters was replaced with the caret mark. (Shift+6) The caret mark's useful for programming; it indicates exponents. It's also useful on usenet; we can't use graphics there, so we tend to make art from plaintext. (You can see a bit of ASCII art in my sigfile. There's supposed to be a space before the X, but something about the conversion to HTML screwed with that.)
     
  16. Imported

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    BRMSTN69: UM yeh, did I mention I'm not computer illeteriat, I'm computer STUPID you might as well be speaking Klingon to me(I had to have a friend come over to put my avatar up for me, and cant even figure out how to use the quotes or direct link features when making post) I'm hopeless, sad thing is I have 3 computers, high speed DSL wireless networking, printer, scaner, copier,ect. and don't know how to use any of it (I can't even paste & copy)
     
  17. jonb

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    Well, that's the problem: Most folks who own a computer anymore, don't know any of the specs. The caret mark, also called the hat, is the ^ mark. It's used in proofreading to indicate something's missing, or in programming to indicate an exponent. For example,

    2^3=2*2*2=8
    3^2=3*3=9

    However, at the time, memory was low, so they axed the cent sign, figuring that most everything will be over a dollar anyway.

    About ASCII art: Some fora don't allow you to show images, so we type out text (That's with a font like Courier where all the letters have the same width.) in such a pattern that it forms the image. For example, ^_^ is a smilie face. However, we can make multiple lines of it if we use the proper font. It can be used to make charts, engineering schematics, structural formulae, and so on. This is called ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) art. ASCII artists also make cute things, such as the little ribbon in my sigfile.
     
  18. Imported

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    LoveGirl: I have seen some of the cutest stuff made out of that but I didn't know it had a name. Thanks jonb for your endless well of knowledge!
     
  19. Imported

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    Javierdude22:
    Well, Turkey is also the ónly one that seems to deny the genocide they inflicted on Armenians. Evrybody else acknowledged it quite some time ago. This might actually make for a nice political turmoil since they will probably be forced to recognize their role in the genocide if they want to join the EU someday.

    Maybe that's why most of Holland's political parties therefore say they expect it to take 20-25 years before Turkey can join. I wonder if Turkish politicians read EU's political programmes. Hm..
     
  20. Zingerific

    Zingerific New Member

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    Seeing as Tennessee is a swing state, I doubt that Jackson will be off the twenty any time soon (or ever, for that matter).

    Replacing Roosevelt on the dime with Reagan is absurd. The reason Roosevelt is uniquely suited to be on the dime is because Polio research was the original purpose of the March of (you guessed it) DIMES!

    I think the solution would be to put Reagan on one of those bills that are no longer in circulation. I don't think too many people would mourn if Cleveland were replaced with Reagan on the thousand dollar bill -- and besides, the only people who would see a G note would be Reaganites anyway. :)
     
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