Real ID Act is real trouble!

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Jan 12, 2008.

  1. Principessa

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    Countdown to REAL ID (May 11, 2008)

    119 days, 19 hours, 41 minutes, 27 seconds

    On January 11, 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released the final regulations to implement the requirements of the Real ID. The release of the final regulations is a mere 120 days prior to the implementation deadline established in the Real ID Act.

    DHS estimates the costs for states to implement the Real ID will not exceed $3.9 billion.
    According to a study conducted by NCSL, the National Governors Association and the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the act will cost states more than $11 billion to implement over five years and will have a major impact on services to the public.

    To date, Congress has appropriated only $90 million to assist states with implementation of the Real ID, of which only $6 million has been obligated. The President's FY 2007 and FY 2008 budget proposals did not include any funds to assist states with the implementation of the Real ID.





    Related Articles:
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    Real ID Act on Wikipedia
     
  2. SpeedoMike

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    not at all worried. my safety is most important to me!!
     
  3. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    "Hello Mr. Yakimoto, welcome back to the Gap. How did those assorted tank tops work out?"

    That's from a scene in Minority Report where the main character walks into The Gap and is recognized by a computer who helps him shop.

    Sure it's an invasion of privacy, but it's useful. Privacy is important, but not the apex of security. It's OK to give up a bit of privacy for the sake or convenience or security.

    If all Americans can be quickly and reliably validated as American, then it would make infiltration much more difficult.

    I have one problem with this measure though: Why a driver's license? Many adults don't drive or don't have a license. Why not an Age or Majority card instead?
     
  4. simcha

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    "Those who would sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither." -Ben Franklin.

    No truer words were spoken by my ancestor than these that apply to these dark days of governmental intrusion.

    Please people, wake up before you are branded like cattle for the slaughter!

    Don't be sheep. Be a human and think for yourselves! Sacrificing privacy is sacrificing liberty. Our country was founded on the principles of freedom and liberty. Security is very important. And we cease to be Americans when we sacrifice privacy/liberty/freedom for security. We come closer to a "Big Brother" state.
     
  5. psidom

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    i would totally sacrafice my liberty for my freedom.
    i hope the GPS wrist chips come soon so i can feel even safer.
    because without my government i am weak and impotent.
    right on simcha!!!
     
  6. Principessa

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    I don't mind being greeted upon entry to a store; but if it comes to that I will have to do all my shopping online. :tongue: I hate having some anorexic, commission driven teen follow me about asking if I need a belt with that.

    To the best of my knowledge all states issue county ID cards, for a price. So perhaps this would be available on that as well; but not everyone who doesn't drive has a county ID card. :rolleyes::confused:

    I wouldn't be opposed to a separate national ID as long as my name was never sold for any reason regardless of the solicitor. :biggrin1: It should have my picture on it, name, address, height and weight. That's it, if necessary an ID # can be encoded that is separate from the SS#.

    PS - Love the new avatar. :cool:

     
  7. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Amen.

    The road to fascism is paved with annoying yet innocuous intrusions. This is one of them.
     
  8. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    I love those legs, you Nubian Goddess. Why haven't we had sex yet???
     
  9. Principessa

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    Now see what you've done :clit: how can I go to sleep when my fingers are all pruney. :redface: :wink:
     
  10. SpeedoGuy

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    Because driving is considered a privlege, not a right. So, those who want to excercise that privlege (ie. virtually everyone) must agree to exchange their privacy and henceforth play by whatever rules the government wants to set. In other words, participation in the ID program would be voluntary.

    Just like breathing and eating are voluntary.
     
  11. DC_DEEP

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    njqt, I ranted about this very subject until everyone on LPSG was sick of hearing from me.

    Simcha, my friend, your views are MILD compared to mine, regarding the REAL ID.

    To anyone who thinks this is either a good idea, or something that will make us "more secure," you are a fool. It will make you much, much less secure.

    Folks, regardless of what the idiots in washington may have been telling you for the last couple of decades, we (the citizens) do not exist to serve The Machine. The Machine exists to serve us - and The Machine has lost all sight of that concept.

    The Constitution was NOT designed to limit the rights of citizens, but rather to keep tight reins on force majeur... whether that's the government, the christian right, or any other bully group.

    Real ID expands the government's "authority" to disregard laws designed to protect citizens. It is a bad idea, and should be fought tooth & nail.
     
  12. Principessa

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    Oh good so my first impression was correct. This is a very bad idea! I wouldn't be surprised if they wanted to put GPS chips in them as well. FWIW-I'm against that too.

    The fact it was tagged onto another bill that they knew had to pass is always a bad indicator. They should outlaw Christmas Tree Bills

    "christmas tree" bill - Informal nomenclature for a bill on the Senate floor that attracts many, often unrelated, floor amendments. The amendments which adorn the bill may provide special benefits to various groups or interests.

     
  13. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    Speedo, I enjoy your intelligent, magnanimous, unbigoted posts, but I have to disagree.

    I mean, I agree that a driver's license is a privilege, but I disagree that only people who drive a car should have the extra protection provided by the government. Imagine somebody not being able to board a plane because they don't have a driver's license?

    America is fast becoming so elitest with people being denied service because they don't have cell phones or Internet access.
     
  14. Principessa

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    You don't have a cell phone!?!? :confused: Forget it, you're not hot to me anymore. :tongue: j/k :biggrin1:
     
  15. SpeedoMike

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    the State of California Department of Motor Vehicles issues an Identification Card which is essentially a driver's license for people who don't drive. It's not required, but you'll need one if you want to prove your identity or age, as an example, in situations like buying cigarettes and beer or going thru airport security).
     
  16. ManlyBanisters

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    Were the the Weathermen not American? Were the SLA not American? Was Timothy McVeigh not American? Are there no second generation fundamentalist Islamists in the US who hold US passports? (like the UK tube bombers)

    In other words I don't understand why you only feel under threat from non-US passport holders.

    Worth repeating.

    Is this sarcasm?

    Seemingly innocuous, seemingly...

    Yup - you'll have internment next.. well you already kind of do in Guantanamo. OT I know, but why is it most people seem to be OK with that?
     
  17. Mem

    Mem
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    We already have a 6 point ID system in NJ. We need everything but a note from mommy, so I can't imagine that it will be much different here.
     
  18. SpeedoGuy

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    Its much more politically expedient to focus suspicion at bearded, brown skinned foreigners instead of homegrown ex-military guys with crewcuts.

    9/11 was a bonanza for security extremists in the US government who are indifferent to, or hostile to, civil rights.

    See above.
     
  19. D_Tintagel_Demondong

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    DC, you're being a fear monger. Please tell us why this proposal is so horrible.

    The U.S. government has been tagging people with social security cards for decades. It's a simple and effective way of keeping tabs on people. It helps reduce "double dipping" fraud and keep the nation more secure.

    Aside from the social security card, there are other ways that the government keeps tabs on people:

    • Biometrics has been used in policing for hundreds of years -- Fingerprinting has been used for over 100 years and "wanted" posters for even longer
    • Police can easily trace you if you have a cell phone
    • Websites use "beacons" to trace your online spending habits
    • Space spy satellites are powerful enough to discriminate between one person or another
    • DNA is being used to identify criminal suspects
    Consider the extreme: a national DNA database. Would this be so awful? What is the worst that can happen if the government, or any citizen, can confirm your identity?

    Even the anonymity of the web doesn't protect you. Myspace was asked by the Feds to give them their database of users to supposedly keep tabs on pedophiles. Myspace politely declined.

    I'd be more concerned with the Homeland Security act, "probable cause" is almost obsolete. The government can now follow you, hack your computer, tap your phone, or even arrest you for no good reason.
     
  20. tim36

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    I am having uneasy thoughts on this, in that Im wondering what is going to be next, "in the name of security", that the government is going to do. Also will this apply to those who dont drive, what of them?

    Maybe it will work out, run smoothly and not be a big deal, I dont know, Im just uneasy on it, personally.
     
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