Regional Cuisine

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_Stronzo, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. B_Stronzo

    B_Stronzo New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    4,730
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Plimoth Plantation
    This is intended to be a lighthearted thread where anyone can call back to earlier times in their life and remember what specifically was savored as a local delicacy. Christmas has brought to mind Christmases of old.

    My aunt Isabella was famous (and deservedly so) for her Oyster Scallop (now nearly invariably called "Scalloped Oysters".

    *note: The word is properly pronounced "SCALL' up" not "scal' up". Properly pronounced scallop should rhyme with trollop.


    There's not a scallop anywhere near the dish but there sure are oysters in abundance. The remaining ingredients are Yankee fare at its ventricle-shutting best. This dish is mainly freshly shucked oysters, butter, crumbled crackers and heavy cream. The subtle flavor of the oysters permeates the whole thing. The smell of it cooking is like an orgasmic homecoming.

    Here are a few other non-holiday specific New England favorites:

    Boston Baked Beans (NOT MADE WITH BLACK STRAP MOLLASSES BUT RATHER BROWN SUGAR AND SALT PORK and at least three kinds of beans)

    Spanish Cream

    Indian pudding (I despise it)

    Floating Island

    Homemade Prune Ice Cream (no joke! And it's delicious)

    Parsnip Stew

    New England Quahog (hard shell clam) chowder (an all-time favorite).

    *****************************************************

    What regional dishes bring back fond childhood memories or were known only to your family (the recipes guarded jealously by previous generations)?
     
    #1 B_Stronzo, Dec 26, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2009
  2. nudeyorker

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    42,918
    Likes Received:
    38
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    NYC/Honolulu
    I don't think that the food I remember from childhood could be called regional so much as jewish fare. ( grew up in California) But one of the things I remember distinctly were dungeness crab when they were in season. We started visiting Hawaii when I was about five years old and the regional delights there are numerous. My favorites are Okinawan sweet potato pie with haupia (coconut pudding), Manapua's (steamed dumplings) with almost any type of filling but the best are the bbq pork and shave ice (snow cones). There used to be a place called King's Hawaiian Bakery that had the best bread for french toast.
     
  3. D_Andreas Sukov

    D_Andreas Sukov Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,933
    Likes Received:
    3
    my nan makes a mean Chicken soup (which she calls Jewish penicillin). it has loads of veg and chicken and potatoes. its one of the best things i have ever eaten. im so happy she is making me a few bowls to take back to portsmouth with me
     
  4. wall_guy

    wall_guy New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    nashville
    Grew Up in the south, so: cornbread dressing was a must as well as giblet gravey. Also you had to have country ham, sweet potatos, creamed with marshmellows on top, green beans, turnip greens, yeast rolls, coconut cake, and jamb cake with carmel icing. Just had last night. Hmmm! so good!
     
  5. arthurdent

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,936
    Albums:
    5
    Likes Received:
    344
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    High Wycombe (GB)
    My mum, a Bristolian, used to make a mean west country faggot and I still love them, though I have to buy Brain's Faggots in Tesco as I can't be bothered to make them myself.
     
    #5 arthurdent, Dec 26, 2009
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2009
  6. ukthickmeat

    ukthickmeat Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Messages:
    201
    Albums:
    3
    Likes Received:
    65
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Birmingham (GB)
    I'm facinated by the foods you list above

    Since I'm English we had an oven cooked Turkey
    but with Mixed veg (peas, carrots, and green beans.) with both mashed and roast potatoes with the meat covered in bread sauce.

    Probably not typically what most British people have with their Christmas turkey but hey...

    Loving the guide here.. We pronounce this word Skolluup which does Rhyme with Trollop..

    A Scollop in my city (Birmingham, England) is a slice of potato that has been put in batter usually sold as a single item at a Fish and Chip shop.

    Also in my city which is both classed as northern and southen we can pronounce things two different ways.. and I usually do..

    (you say potato, i say tomato.)
     
  7. Sergeant_Torpedo

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,409
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    UK
    UKthickmeat, the traditional English scallop can be a version of the French souffle potatoes - should be twice deep fried, though most people have the chip shop version. Thinly sliced Jerusalem artichokes are also called scallops. Regional food unlike the so called haute cuisine relies on locally produced foods prepared in season. Sadly this no longer applies in Britain.

    North American cuisine is essentially European peasant food. A 17th century Englishman transported forwards to North and South Carolinas now he would recognize the routine daily dishes. Food, particularly the food of our childhood (usually provided by some well loved female relative) has a strong hold on our memories, even our character. Proust's Remembrance Of Things Past is about a desire for madeleines. Breaking bread together is perhaps the most civilized thing we humans do.
     
  8. arthurdent

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,936
    Albums:
    5
    Likes Received:
    344
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    High Wycombe (GB)
    Not sure what you mean by that! Although most British people probably do buy most of their food at their local supermarket, there are plenty of small shops and farmers markets around where you can buy locally grown and prepared seasonal food, if you're prepared to look for it.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted