Return of Rev. Wright

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_jacknapier, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. B_jacknapier

    B_jacknapier New Member

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    So I may be wrong, but I don't think there's a thread for this yet. I'm making it because I want to discuss.

    What do you think of the return of this controversial figure? How do you think this affects the race? Personally, I'm a bit suspicious that Rev. Wright has been paid off by the GOP.
     
  2. Elmer Gantry

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    I think he's an over opinionated loony who has found a stage to rant from.
     
  3. dong20

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    Had he been away? No postcards, no calls ... :cool:
     
  4. B_jacknapier

    B_jacknapier New Member

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    Right? that's EXACTLY what makes me so suspicious. this has GOP written all over it
     
  5. widenine

    widenine New Member

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    I, too, would like to discuss the jeremy wright contributions to this already unusual race for the white house. In the long run, he's stealing the thunder from the Republicans who already planned to bring his association and views to the fore front in September. The shock value is over and Obama is getting great experience before the republican bitterness prevails. In this sense the reverend is doing Obama a favor. Too bad he didn't wait until after the May sixth elections, however. But if Barack wins despite this mess, all the better for him. I don't, therefore, belive he's a pawn for the GOP.

    I believe Rev. Wright is a good man with a sharp mind.... who has lost sight of how much this country has evolved/shifted it's attitudes about race and tolerance. He is bitter because of his life's experiences and never ending struggles with "white hostility", oppression and the angst associated in the battle against it.

    It causes him to lack trust and to be "extremely" intolerant to any degree of racism or the perception of racism. He's programmed to battle that enemy in daily life and at the pulpit. If you think his views are strong, just list to Martin Luther Kings "Mountain top" speech that was delivered the night before his assassination. The FBI labelled him the most dangerous man in America.

    But today really is not yesterday and we are better off racially. I believe that his role as a minister and historian needs to reflect the good intentions of contemporary white individuals in America... even if aspects of the American system are still based on outdated traditions. Glass ceilings at work for women and minorities, housing discrimination, economic and penal injustices are examples of the "aspects" mentioned above.

    Speaking of the American system, change to embrace equality is very expensive for White American priviledge classes. And it's distasteful to some white americans who are not and have not considered themselves part of that priviledge.


    This real possibility of a black man running the oval office, I feel, is evidence that both white people and american traditions are adjusting to modern demographics.

    Note: I'm speaking "white and black" intentionally. And it's because of my unsubstantiated belief that the other minority groups are favoring hilary clinton, who represents traditional whiteness in the oval office, despite her gender. And because white women have always been beside white men in the white house, I see her as less of a shift away from American tradition than Obama and his black family.

    Note that I'm also discounting the black vote when I focus on the change in white americans. They are largely responsible for Obama being where he is. Blacks don't have the numbers to maintin his momentum. So in my mind, the revend needs to acknowlege this tremendous change from elections of the past and give praise to those who deserve it.
     
  6. B_Lightkeeper

    B_Lightkeeper New Member

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    I agree with you.
     
  7. Trinity

    Trinity New Member

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    The return of Rev. Wright is bad for Obama. Rev. Wright was always wrong...now Obama was forced to admit that. Unfortunately, many in the African American community supported Wright and with Obama distancing himself from Wright to save his candidacy, he is throwing their alignment with Wright along with Wright under the bus. It also brings back the issue of "What was Obama doing being in Wright's church for 20 years if 'he doesn't know the man?' " Why was he his advisor and mentor? And brings back up the fact that Obama had to know about Wright's ideological beliefs waaay before now.

    The New York Times

    March 6, 2007

    Disinvitation by Obama Is Criticized

    By JODI KANTOR

    CHICAGO, March 5 — The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., senior pastor of the popular Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago and spiritual mentor to Senator Barack Obama, thought he knew what he would be doing on Feb. 10, the day of Senator Obama’s presidential announcement.

    After all, back in January, Mr. Obama had asked Mr. Wright if he would begin the event by delivering a public invocation.
    But Mr. Wright said Mr. Obama called him the night before the Feb. 10 announcement and rescinded the invitation to give the invocation.
    “Fifteen minutes before Shabbos I get a call from Barack,” Mr. Wright said in an interview on Monday, recalling that he was at an interfaith conference at the time. “One of his members had talked him into uninviting me,” Mr. Wright said, referring to Mr. Obama’s campaign advisers.
    Some black leaders are questioning Mr. Obama’s decision to distance his campaign from Mr. Wright because of the campaign’s apparent fear of criticism over Mr. Wright’s teachings, which some say are overly Afrocentric to the point of excluding whites.

    Bill Burton, a spokesman for the Obama campaign, said the campaign disinvited Mr. Wright because it did not want the church to face negative attention. Mr. Wright did however, attend the announcement and prayed with Mr. Obama beforehand.

    “Senator Obama is proud of his pastor and his church, but because of the type of attention it was receiving on blogs and conservative talk shows, he decided to avoid having statements and beliefs being used out of context and forcing the entire church to defend itself,” Mr. Burton said.
    Instead, Mr. Obama asked Mr. Wright’s successor as pastor at Trinity, the Rev. Otis Moss III, to speak. Mr. Moss declined.

    In recent weeks, word of Mr. Obama’s treatment of Mr. Wright has reached black leaders like the Rev. Al Sharpton and given them pause.
    “I have not discussed this with Senator Obama in detail, but I can see why callers of mine and other clergymen would be concerned, because the issue is standing by your own pastor,” Mr. Sharpton said.

    Mr. Wright’s church, the 8,000-member Trinity United Church of Christ, is considered mainstream — Oprah Winfrey has attended services, and many members are prominent black professionals. But the church is also more Afrocentric and politically active than standard black congregations.
    Mr. Wright helped organize the 1995 Million Man March on Washington and along with other United Church of Christ ministers was one of the first black religious leaders to protest apartheid and welcome gay and lesbian worshippers.

    Since Mr. Obama made his presidential ambitions clear, conservatives have drawn attention to his close relationship to Mr. Wright and to the church’s emphasis on black empowerment. Tucker Carlson of MSNBC called the precepts “racially exclusive” and “wrong.” Last week, on the Fox News program “Hannity & Colmes,” Erik Rush, a conservative columnist, called the church “quite cultish, quite separatist.”

    In Monday’s interview, Mr. Wright expressed disappointment but no surprise that Mr. Obama might try to play down their connection.
    “When his enemies find out that in 1984 I went to Tripoli” to visit Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, Mr. Wright recalled, “with Farrakhan, a lot of his Jewish support will dry up quicker than a snowball in hell.” Mr. Wright added that his trip implied no endorsement of either Louis Farrakhan’s views or Qaddafi’s.

    Mr. Wright said that in the phone conversation in which Mr. Obama disinvited him from a role in the announcement, Mr. Obama cited an article in Rolling Stone, “The Radical Roots of Barack Obama.”
    According to the pastor, Mr. Obama then told him, “You can get kind of rough in the sermons, so what we’ve decided is that it’s best for you not to be out there in public

    Patrick Healy contributed reporting from Washington.
     
  8. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    No... how about this is whom Wright is, and this is whom/where Obama's roots are. Plain and simple. He's a hot head, who keeps going and going. The "pay off" will come from the DNC to keep his pie hole shut... which will be difficult.

    This ties in with quite a few things on where Obama stands as well... i.e. supreme court justices that don't rule on the law, but social inequities.

    However... the Obama team has constructed 4-6 stances on his feelings about Mr Wright (he's no reverend...notice the article above declares the same thing)... and they will go with whatever poll is most favorable, and not where and what Barry actually feels about it. Take it to the bank... that is modern politics.
     
  9. Trinity

    Trinity New Member

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    The New York Times article referred to the RollingStone Article which suspiciously had a title change...there is an article written specifically on that...Calling it damage control for Barack Obama:

    RollingStone changes headline

    The Original Title of the article as noted in the NY Times was "The Radical Roots of Barack Obama"

    Excerpt
    from Destiny's Child originally The Radical Roots of Barack Obama
    RollingStone
    by BEN WALLACE-WELLS
    Posted Feb 22, 2007 12:28 PM

    [SIZE=+2]-T[/SIZE]he Trinity United Church of Christ, the church that Barack Obama attends in Chicago, is at once vast and unprepossessing, a big structure a couple of blocks from the projects, in the long open sore of a ghetto on the city's far South Side. The church is a leftover vision from the Sixties of what a black nationalist future might look like. There's the testifying fervor of the black church, the Afrocentric Bible readings, even the odd dashiki. And there is the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, a sprawling, profane bear of a preacher, a kind of black ministerial institution, with his own radio shows and guest preaching gigs across the country. Wright takes the pulpit here one Sunday and solemnly, sonorously declares that he will recite ten essential facts about the United States. "Fact number one: We've got more black men in prison than there are in college," he intones. "Fact number two: Racism is how this country was founded and how this country is still run!" There is thumping applause; Wright has a cadence and power that make Obama sound like John Kerry. Now the reverend begins to preach. "We are deeply involved in the importing of drugs, the exporting of guns and the training of professional KILLERS. . . . We believe in white supremacy and black inferiority and believe it more than we believe in God. . . . We conducted radiation experiments on our own people. . . . We care nothing about human life if the ends justify the means!" The crowd whoops and amens as Wright builds to his climax: "And. And. And! GAWD! Has GOT! To be SICK! OF THIS SHIT!"


    This is as openly radical a background as any significant American political figure has ever emerged from, as much Malcolm X as Martin Luther King Jr. Wright is not an incidental figure in Obama's life, or his politics. The senator "affirmed" his Christian faith in this church; he uses Wright as a "sounding board" to "make sure I'm not losing myself in the hype and hoopla." Both the title of Obama's second book, The Audacity of Hope, and the theme for his keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in 2004 come from Wright's sermons. "If you want to understand where Barack gets his feeling and rhetoric from," says the Rev. Jim Wallis, a leader of the religious left, "just look at Jeremiah Wright."

    Obama wasn't born into Wright's world. His parents were atheists, an African bureaucrat and a white grad student, Jerry Falwell's nightmare vision of secular liberals come to life. Obama could have picked any church — the spare, spiritual places in Hyde Park, the awesome pomp and procession of the cathedrals downtown. He could have picked a mosque, for that matter, or even a synagogue. Obama chose Trinity United. He picked Jeremiah Wright. Obama writes in his autobiography that on the day he chose this church, he felt the spirit of black memory and history moving through Wright, and "felt for the first time how that spirit carried within it, nascent, incomplete, the possibility of moving beyond our narrow dreams."

    Obama has now spent two years in the Senate and written two books about himself, both remarkably frank: There is a desire to own his story, to be both his own Boswell and his own investigative reporter. When you read his autobiography, the surprising thing — for such a measured politician — is the depth of radical feeling that seeps through, the amount of Jeremiah Wright that's packed in there. Perhaps this shouldn't be surprising. Obama's life story is a splicing of two different roles, and two different ways of thinking about America's. One is that of the consummate insider, someone who has been raised believing that he will help to lead America, who believes in this country's capacity for acts of outstanding virtue. The other is that of a black man who feels very deeply that this country's exercise of its great inherited wealth and power has been grossly unjust. This tension runs through his life; Obama is at once an insider and an outsider, a bomb thrower and the class president. "I'm somebody who believes in this country and its institutions," he tells me. "But I often think they're broken."

    Read the full article
     
  10. yngjock20

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    Rev. Wright is going to see himself lined up next to Al Sharpton on the media roundtable when the next "racial profiling" discussion breaks and that's it.

    He's using the media to further extend his message, but no one wants to hear it. Radical preaching is something that isn't new to "Christianity" as it's portrayed in the medias eyes. Most of the noteworthy evangelist, ministers or what have you have stood on exaggerated morals and quick judgments about society. The only differences are the link to the White House and the "Black" elephant in the room.
     
  11. Trinity

    Trinity New Member

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    Not exactly. It is impossible to mesh Wright with Obama's message which is why Obama attempted to 'divorce' himself from Wright. The 'outrage' and 'I don't know you' tactic is an attempt to say Wright isn't apart of Obama but its too late...we already believed Wright was apart Obama.

    Wright was Obama's wayward 'uncle,' he was likened to Obama's white grandmother, he was his spiritual advisor, mentor, pastor for 20 years and friend. Now, Obama doesn't know the man.

    "If you want to understand where Barack gets his feeling and rhetoric from," says the Rev. Jim Wallis, a leader of the religious left, "just look at Jeremiah Wright."

    It just doesn't mesh with the trancending racial divides message so it must be abondoned. However, Obama's judgment is called into question and what he truly believes.
     
  12. Shelby

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    Obama joined Trinity as an ambitious young man looking for a way to seem more black in largely black Chicago. He felt he needed a way to gain street cred if he were to realize his goals.

    Now it's coming back to bite him.
     
  13. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    Change. It's about change for the sake of change, though.
     
  14. VeeP

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    BINGO. And who'd have thought he'd get 'swift-boated' by his own pastor? Not him, evidently.
     
  15. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    Was going to tie in that term, but realized... Kerry got "swift-boated" by his own people. Swift boat captains that have the right and were there and can make the criticism. Wright on the other hand is being called out by the public/mass, not by his "peers". Ergo, this isn't a "swift-boating".
     
  16. Skull Mason

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    I actually started a thread on this but I guess it went over people's heads
     
  17. VeeP

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    I was using the term more broadly... as in something out of the blue that's knocked a campaign completely off-kilter at a critical moment.

    Not mine!

    *watches as others continue to speculate as to which LPSG member has returned*
     
  18. faceking

    faceking Well-Known Member

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    No I know what you meant, and that is the common definition. But it does somewhat of a disservice to what should of been left amongst the swiftboaters, I thought it petty, but the merits of the debate was their own... having never been up a river in the Vietnam War on an tiny aluminum craft.

    ...blathering...
     
  19. Ms.Teacher

    Ms.Teacher New Member

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    He had no choice but to come back. He's been talked about and written about in the past few weeks probably more than the presidential candidates. He's caused a lot of damage, and he can back peddle all we wants, but I think it's best for him to disappear. I certainly wouldn't want to call him my pastor or my friend.

    You're not serious. :rolleyes:
     
  20. Shelby

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    Ironically, at least for me, one of Obama's characteristics I most admire, one that gives me most cause for hope, his ability to see things from the point of view of two cultures within one, may turn out to be his undoing.
     
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