Road Trips. Advice please.

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Drifterwood, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. Drifterwood

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    I am thinking of taking time off next year and taking a road trip. If it works with other committments, I may make it an annual thing.

    My first idea is Canada, East Coast to West Coast. Is this a good idea? How long will I need? What time of year should I go? Will I need more than one team of dogs? How many hats will I need :smile:?
     
  2. Nrets

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    Canada East Coast to West Coast could be done in 4 insane days in the summer. The roads are paved all the way across in the Southern part of Canada. But in reality most people would be exhausted to try and do it in one week. You would want at least two weeks to allow for rest and perhaps some side wandering. I would not try and drive across Canada in the Winter as it snows with regularity over the Eastern 3000 miles. Personally I think autumn would be good. The leaves are changing colors at that time. Summer might be best to avoid cold. You only need dogs if you are going into the northern territories. For Canada you would want all layers of clothes and a vehicle that has a combination of utility, reliability, and decent gas mileage. I would carry whatever I need to get me through a couple days of being stuck.
     
    #2 Nrets, Oct 5, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2009
  3. D_Mansworthy Meatwrench III

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    Route 66, my man. All you ever need is there: Beat up highway, and everything you can imagine along the side of it, including the Cadillac Graveyard.
     
  4. nudeyorker

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    The time of year depends entirely on if you like cold weather or not. I'm assuming that you might want to start in Halifax and end in Vancouver. From my own experience I've only been to Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver. I'm sure their are many places that I missed. Maybe some of the members from Canada can offer more insight. Are you going to drive across the country or take the train. or fly to your destinations. That would certainly help determine your timeline.
     
  5. Drifterwood

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    I'd prefer to drive, and take up to four weeks. I was also assuming that summer would give the easiest accessability.

    I'd like to experience as much of the wilderness as possible. Yeah yeah, like Quebec :biggrin1:

    I would also like to get to Vancouver and do some sailing.
     
  6. Drifterwood

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    I hope my Canadian friends don't think I am being rude about Quebec, hats etc., that is just my way.

    I am very serious about this and would welcome any local advice.
     
  7. jeff black

    jeff black <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    You'll take a while... but make sure you stop in a few good places.

    Ontario is the best, by far. Though, if you are smart, you'd definitely consider the summer. It gets VERY snowy in parts and roads will get rough.
     
  8. DiscoBoy

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  9. Rikter8

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    Whats the Speed limit on that Trans-Canada tour? Would be much more awesome doing triple digit across canada
     
  10. DiscoBoy

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    Usually 55mph, but I'm sure much of it is deserted and you could easily get away with breaking the limit. Watch out for the Mounties, though :wink:.
     
  11. Rikter8

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    PSH!

    They're no match for the Bandit!!
     
  12. Drifterwood

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    Thanks JB. Is Ontario Bopperbasting central? :wink:

    No no - I want to experience being there, soaking in the pristine vastness in this ever shrinking world. Somehow the thought of a V8 doing over 6000 revs seems way out of place. I can go to Germany for boys toys.

    A toke in the UK is a smoke :tongue:. Thanks for the heads up and the link.
     
  13. got_lost

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    I drove round Lake Ontario a year ago.
    Autumnal colours were stunning.
    I can recommend October.

    Hire cars at Toronto airport include the half petrol/half electric cars too so it was pretty economic to drive (though very very quiet... hard to tell if you'd turned the engine on or not.... :rolleyes: doh!)
     
  14. Drifterwood

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    I wouldn't give you that problem K8. :rolleyes:

    And thanks for the advice.
     
  15. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    You must do the Banff-Jasper highway in the Rockies, Drifter.
    But I'll post more later on.
    The idea of hitting Ontario/Kwebec in late October for the foliage is a good one, BTW.
     
  16. got_lost

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    Though that does mean you either have to pack this week or wait a whole year!!!

    youchee
     
  17. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    I'll take a road trip with you. Anytime.

    Besides, like Mussolini, we make the trains run on time. :biggrin1:
     
  18. got_lost

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    :lmao: we doooo!!!! :biggrin1:

    Do you realise that this means it's almost a year since we DIDN'T meet in Montreal!?!? :smile:
     
  19. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    Ah. The fabled Oktoberfest [debacle].

    But, guurl, we sure know how to make up for lost time, don't we?!
     
  20. midlifebear

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    Definitely start in Halifax if you can. The giant tides of Nova Scotia are truly amazing. From there drive on to Quebec City. A beautiful place where the local tradition for steak tartare is to serve a big, floppy, paper thin slice of raw beef that drapes over the edges of the platter. None of that nouvelle "mince the meat until it is unrecognizable." There are a couple of options for driving from Quebec to Montreal and by the time you've arrived you'll have quickly picked up the Quebecois accent (if you speak French). Montreal is worth at least three or four days of spooking about.

    On the way out of Montreal you can begin to check out provincial parks for camping and moose worship. Ontario has the largest mosquitos in the world, so you'll need to constantly replenish your supply of DEET. But the lakes and forests are incredible.

    Following the Trans Canadian Highway will lead you through Sudbury (a mining town built on rock for there is NO soil). There are various places along the edge of Lake Ontario where you can risk hypothermia by jumping in the pristine water and turning completely blue in less than 15 minutes -- in the middle of July to August. Thunder Bay is a cute little spot for breakfast al fresco, good coffee, and watching tankers as large as the largest in the world slip quietly by several hundred feet off shore (usually carrying grain). That's when you realize the Great Lakes are really much greater than you imagined.

    Winnipeg is an odd city in the northern prairie that boasts a world-class ballet company and more art fairs and events packed into the short summer than probably any place in the world.

    There are places along the Trans Canadian where you'll want to stop and live out the rest of your life (until you realize the bucolic intense green world is covered in 40 feet of snow for more than half the year. Saskatchewan has some of the most amusing political graffiti in the mens rooms truck stops that you'll ever encounter. By all means plan your trip so you have to spend the night in Moosejaw. They have a tiny transportation museum that is hilarious and everybody needs a post card from Moosejaw.

    Alberta is probably the most conservative of all the Provinces, but Calgary has a great rodeo (stampede) and if you have the bad luck of visiting Edmonton you'll be amused at how much of the city is now underground (cold, long winters). But from Calgary you can enjoy the drive over the Canadian Rockies which aren't any higher in altitude than the US Rockies, except the canyons and valley floors are at a lower altitude so they LOOK humungous. And there is Banff (sp?) with it's odd lake filled with milky blue water and there are the hot springs and spas you can spend days floating about at around 7,000 feet and enjoying the local scenery.

    On the other side of the Rockies there is Whistler (my favorite place to ski and that's saying something because I grew up carving down the mountainsides of of Ewetaw's famous "dry" powder.

    Take the time to visit Kelowna and cruise the Canadian wine country. By then you'll realize that Canada, compared to the USA, is: 1. generally cleaner; 2. the people are friendlier; 3. Canada obviously is suffering substantially less from the "world" economic melt down than the USA; 4. Canadians enjoy a substantially better quality of life than their neighbors to the south; 5. and that Toronto is the worst city Canadians can build where the average 'Mericuhn from New York or Boston can feel somewhat at home.

    Once you make it to Vancouver you can find neighborhoods of economic blight, but you sort of have to go out of your way to find them. And the fusion of Asian food that is available in the City of Vancouver rivals that of San Francisco.

    And if you're into camping and out door activities, Canada wins big time. Only Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the ragged outcroppings of rugged red rock that define southern Ewetaw are in the same league when it comes to outright stunning natural beauty. But those places have smaller mosquitos and moose worship is not as out in the open as it is in Canada.

    And don't hesitate to take the ferry to Vancouver Island where you can sample the best sausage rolls in the world at small, independent bakeries. Victoria, the capital of Vancouver Island, is no longer the land of the newlywed or nearly dead. British Columbia has the greatest collections of totems enclosed in glass museums in the the Pacific North West. However, if you go to see them at the busiest time of the summer tourist season, they'll most likely be closed because the government employees will be on strike.

    And then there is the beer. Besides Labatts, Canadians have truly mastered the art of micro brewing the best nectar of the guys.

    And when you return home, you'll have acquired the habit of interjecting "Eh?" whenever you speak.
     
    #20 midlifebear, Oct 6, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
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