Shin Splints - Is There Any Cure?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_ScaredLittleBoy, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    I've come to the realisation that I have shin splints. I've had them before but never this bad. It probably doesn't help that I walk at least a mile up very steep hills to work every day.

    I have to stop at least three times, usually five and rotate my legs in a circular motion. I did initially think my calf muscles were stiffening up but I doubt that's the case...I feel the ache in my shins, especially when I cock my leg up and start rotating it.

    Anyway this is quite annoying; imagine an ache in your shins with every step you walk. At least every uphill step. It's not so bad over short distances.

    Anyway...is there any cure/help for this?

    PS I think I did it while skipping. I also managed to damage a muscle in my foot while skipping...I feel old now and its pretty embarrassing.

    Help!
     
  2. Ed69

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    Do you have a scooter or moped to get to work?The only way this will heal is to stay off your feet for a while.It's like tennis elbow or carpal tunell.repetative use on any body part will do this.My wife has had this problem and the only way it got better was staying off her feet for a month.
     
  3. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    A month? :eek:

    I was hoping taking it easy this weekend would solve it...and I only have my feet to get me to work although I am thinking of leaving once I get paid :cool:

    Then I'll have time to rest. It sux tho
     
  4. jp

    jp
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    I had them when I ran track in school and they've recently flared up again. My track coach taught me an exercise that helps. Flex your foot and hold it for a 10 count, use resistance if you can like a theraband. Repeat the exercise for at least 5 min total. You'll feel a difference in 3 days.
     
  5. _avg_

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    Have you tried different shoes? Or at least padded (jel-style) in-soles. Worked for me many years ago.
     
  6. Ragin'4 fun

    Ragin'4 fun New Member

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    These things with an arch support along with the resistance excercises and resting them as much as you can will help.

    Of course if you're in constant pain, you should rest them before you begin the excecises jp_philosophy described.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Principessa

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  8. Ragin'4 fun

    Ragin'4 fun New Member

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    LOL I was wondering the same thing! :confused::biggrin1::confused:
     
  9. Industrialsize

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    Shin Splints (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)


    Many athletes get shin splints at one time or another. Whether you jog daily or just had to sprint to catch a bus one day, you may have shin splints when you feel throbbing and aching in your shins. While they often heal on their own, severe shin splints can ruin your game.
    Shin splints aren’t really a single medical condition. Instead, they’re just a symptom of an underlying problem. They might be caused by:
    • Irritated and swollen muscles, often caused by overuse.
    • Stress fractures, which are tiny, hairline breaks in the lower leg bones.
    • Overpronation or ''flat feet" -- when the impact of a step causes the arch of your foot to collapse, stretching the muscles and tendons.
    Shin splints are very common. They’re the cause of 13% of all running injuries. Runners might get them after ramping up their workout intensity, or changing the surface they run on -- like shifting from a dirt path to asphalt. Shin splints are also common in dancers.
    What Do Shin Splints Feel Like?

    Shin splints cause dull, aching pain in the front of the lower leg. Some people feel it only during exercise; others, when they’ve stopped exercising. Sometimes, the pain is constant.
    Depending on the exact cause, the pain may be located along the side of the shinbone or in the muscles. The area may be painful to the touch. Swollen muscles can sometimes irritate the nerves in the feet, causing them to feel weak or numb.
    To diagnose shin splints, your doctor will give you a thorough physical exam. He or she may want to see you run to look for problems. You may also need X-rays or bone scans to look for fractures. Other tests are sometimes necessary.
    What’s the Treatment for Shin Splints?

    Although shin splints may be caused by different problems, treatment is usually the same: Rest your body so the underlying issue heals. Here are some other things to try:

    • Icing the shin to reduce pain and swelling. Do it for 20-30 minutes every 3-4 hours for 2-3 days, or until the pain is gone.
    • Anti-inflammatory painkillers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like Advil, Aleve, or Motrin, will help with pain and swelling. However, these drugs can have side effects, like an increased risk of bleeding and ulcers. They should be used only occasionally unless your doctor specifically says otherwise.
    • Arch supports for your shoes. These orthotics -- which can be custom-made or bought off the shelf -- may help with flat feet.
    • Range of motion exercises, if your doctor recommends them.
    • Physical therapy to strengthen the muscles in your shins.
     
  10. ruperty

    ruperty Member

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  11. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    Yes I mean with a skipping rope.

    I have some running shoes (Adidas Supernova) but can't really wear them since they're 'scruffy' and pretty decked in. I think the support in them might have broken too.

    I do think my shoes are part of the problem. They're Adidas Chile 'sneakers'. I get quite a significant pain trying to fit my swollen foot into them. Especially on the top of my foot...

    I will try and rest. Would Deep Heat help or not? Is that just relief for pain as opposed to treatment?
     
  12. Principessa

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    Why did you ask for help if you weren't going to read the responses? :tongue: Industrialsize and myself both answered your question already.

    What’s the Treatment for Shin Splints?

    Although shin splints may be caused by different problems, treatment is usually the same: Rest your body so the underlying issue heals. Here are some other things to try:

    • Icing the shin to reduce pain and swelling. Do it for 20-30 minutes every 3-4 hours for 2-3 days, or until the pain is gone.
    • Anti-inflammatory painkillers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like Advil, Aleve, or Motrin, will help with pain and swelling. However, these drugs can have side effects, like an increased risk of bleeding and ulcers. They should be used only occasionally unless your doctor specifically says otherwise.
    • Arch supports for your shoes. These orthotics -- which can be custom-made or bought off the shelf -- may help with flat feet.
    • Range of motion exercises, if your doctor recommends them.
    • Physical therapy to strengthen the muscles in your
     
  13. SCbi

    SCbi New Member

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    Rest......to get over the current irratation..avoid pounding heals and walking up stairs hills etc

    Build up the Calf muscles.....to avoid this down the road.....

    also check shoes....good pair of running shoes or exercise shoes with good fit and support will help too
     
  14. Skull Mason

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    Just make sure they aren't stress fractures
     
  15. MidwestGal

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    ice and heat packs every few hours will helpl Mild pain rellievers in nesseary.

    Sitting in a warm bath may helk alittle. But runnign wise you need a couple. massage your legs with lotion. Then make sure to do a therough warmn up.
     
  16. Belly_Dancer

    Belly_Dancer Member

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    Excellent advice so far. The following has already been said, but I'll reiterate it in my own way:

    I've had shin splints before from running, and learned the hard way that you need to take a complete rest from high-impact activity until the pain is totally gone and you don't feel any pain while being active.

    If you don't let it heal, it will just get re-aggravated and come right back every time you try to run (or jump rope) again.

    And when you do start training again, ease into it gradually, and for heaven's sake spend some money and get some some decent shoes. It's worth it.
     
  17. midlifebear

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    But wait there is more!

    While you are recovering, start the following excercise:

    1. Scatter 25 pennies on the floor (carpet is just fine)

    2. Pick up each penny one at time with your toes.

    3. Do this twice a day with each foot.

    Voila! You will notice that the muscles covering your shin bone will eventually strengthen enough to prevent shin splints from recurring. If you've really damaged those (I believe they are "short" muscles), the bumps will never go away. That is scar tissue. However, this will help prevent further injury. This is a standard physical therapy technique used by ballet dancers who suffer from lots of other indignities to their bodies. It actually works.
     
  18. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

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    Thanks everyone. On second thoughts, while walking back up earlier after going to the post office...I felt the pain in my calves. It kinds of feels like they're seizing up/not flexible enough.

    I think its because I used to cycle 4 miles every day and then stopped and haven't been on a bike for a good few years and my muscles are degenerating? :redface::eek:

    Basically I think my legs are fucked. I'll buy a bike soon and start cycling again methinks.
     
  19. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    Yeah, at your advanced age ...:tongue:
    Not!
    Seriously, SLB, I do a lot of leg stretches ... quads, hamstrings, IT bands, and hip flexors.
    Every single day and sometimes twice.
    Maybe you should get into a routine.
    I used to occasionally get shin splints but haven't had them or other problems with my legs for some time. I attribute this to the stretching, though I could be wrong.
    But cycling should help, too.
    Good luck.
     
  20. SexandCandy

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    POTASSIUM. either take a supplement or eat a couple bananas... they help with your muscles... for whatever reason, I learned this bit of knowledge back when I was pregnant...

    And...if anyone gets charlie horses a lot, bananas are a miracle cure. :) It's the potassium level in your body...
     
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