Sounds cool - The Dangerous Book for Boys

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by B_big dirigible, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Amazon.com: The Dangerous Book for Boys: Books: Conn Iggulden,Hal Iggulden

    From the writeup it sounds an awful lot like the library here at Fort Dirigible.

    The books about things real men don't do were a phenomenon for a while here in the US, but that was a while back, before the metrosexual assault. But the proper technique is to "stamp them when they're small."

    Have any UK members noticed the phenomenon?
     
  2. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Neat.

    Boys didn't need an instruction manual back in the day.
     
  3. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Well, just like any other technical manual, the idea is prolly that one doesn't have to learn absolutely everything about the world from scratch by seeing if it bites, or comes apart, or burns, or floats - all prime motivations behind typical boy activities.

    Or maybe it's more in the realm of inspiration. Some books are good for that. I sure wouldn't trade my 1917 "Boy's Book of Submarines" for anything, although I've never gotten anything "useful" out of it. And just last night I D/L'ed a 1918 item, "The Boys' Book of Engine-Building" from Google Books. It looks pretty promising.

    I wonder if the "Dangerous Book" has cool stuff like "Indian Tortures" or amateur taxidermy. There are so many possibilities ...
     
  4. Big Dreamer

    Big Dreamer New Member

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    You're making me want to jump my bike over a homemade ramp, BD. Only now, 25 years later, I'm guessing that the landing will involve a trip to ER and a month off work.
     
  5. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    By a certain age we learn (more or less) what's actually going to hurt, and leave that to our younger, more resilient, more energetic - and less expensive - proteges. Of course we learned it through painful experience.

    But some of us are fortunate enough to have lost only the grosser physical aspects while retaining the important part - the attitude. I'm currently sifting through the effects of an elderly gent who still had his "Horrors of War" bubble-gum cards from 1938, his Aircraft Silhouette Spotter playing card deck, big cast metal models of flying boats, an "operator's manual" for the Fleet-type submarine, an original sword used in the Boxer Rebellion ... all useless crap; but any boy would understand perfectly.
     
  6. dong20

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    I recall this book, vaguely though I don't recall it being a 'phenomenon'.But then like most attempts that attempt to define and pidgeonhole human behaviour by way of labels and/or sexual stereotyping I tend to ignore them.

    As for the 'metrosexual' well it's been discussed here without imparting any real clarity as I recall. I ignore that too, people are what they are; such labeling is only of any real use to sociologists and, it seems those who find it useful or so it sometimes seems, necessary to define who and what they are and thus how they should behave by (someone else's) definition. If anything should be stamped out, it this.

    That said I imagine it could be an amusing read and bring back some happy memories of the probably downright near lethal stuff I did as a kid, but imagining it about as close as I'm likely to come to finding out.
     
  7. SpeedoGuy

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    The map of the Battle of Waterloo reminded me of the many pitched battles my mates and I waged against any nests of yellowjackets we could identify in our neighborhood. Our weapons were BB guns, slingshots, stones and urine. The yellowjackets wielded their own potent retaliatory capability. I recall the stings that reminded me we did not always emerge victorious from those confrontations.
     
  8. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Ah yes, the perpetual rivalry, boys vs. stinging insects.

    Swords. That's the way to show those spineless invertebrates who's boss. Ah, not swords, exactly, but 15" rulers they used to use in the local schools - good solid things of beech, just the thing for whacking stinging insects out of the air.

    Well, it worked most of the time.

    On one memorable occasion, the only good baseball in the group possession of my low companions, a coveted "semi-hard" ball (not one of those wimpy softballs, but one almost as good as a real hardball), landed right next to a huge wasp nest. It took us a while to accumulate the offensive equipment - lots more rulers - we needed to go in and retrieve it.

    After a certain age, we'd say screw that, and just go out and buy another damn ball. I suppose maybe there are things to be said for that approach; but it lacks that monomaniacal quality characteristic of so much of boyhood.
     
  9. madame_zora

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    I had the good-and-bad experience of moving out to "the country" when I was 11. My step-dad was an outdoors kind of guy, and he delighted in the new opportunity to teach me to hunt and fish, paddle a canoe, shoot bows and arrows and the like. Unfortunately for him, I was never able to kill anything, but we had a lot of fun shooting targets on haybales or cans in trees. I had my own swiss army knife, bow, axe and various tools. His lined hunting boots were usually to be found at the foot of my bed, I stole them every chance I got. I could stay outside in the snow for hours longer than anyone else because my feet didn't freeze.

    By 13, my friends and I had built several clubhouses and treeforts, one was a cabin with a plexiglass angled ceiling and several long extension cords bringing electricity to our hideout. We built fires and learned what roots and berries we could eat, it was really a lot of fun. The only retarded things the boys did that I didn't get into involved torturing animals, and we pretty well let those psychos know they couldn't play our games. What ever happened to self-moderation?

    We can't avoid danger, it's a part of life. Learning not to lose your shit when something bad happens is a valuable lesson. My body still carries the scars of being kicked in the knee by a horse at 14, being eaten alive by chiggers while picking blackberries at 13, having my hand run over by a car at 26, and various and sundry other misadventures, but I was never planning to be a super-model anyway. I'm resilliant, and that's good enough.

    Boys and girls sometimes have different interests and abilities, but a whole fucking lot of it has to do with what we're exposed to as kids. I think the problem is that parenting has simply gone out of style.
     
  10. dong20

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    Damn straight. These days it too often seems to be parenting by <insert latest trendy parenting guide/methodology here>. Whatever happened to personal judgement and responsibilty?:rolleyes:
     
  11. novice_btm

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    Excellent recommendation Dirg! Sounds like a fantastic book. I was just having a discussion along these lines last night, that today boys are barely allowed to compete anymore, let alone just be boys. We do seem to swing back and forth though, 80s androgeny, 90s Iron John, 00s Metro's... But that's all the foolishness of men. Boys should just be allow to be, well, boys.

    Thanks again.





    Oh, and just as an aside... the authors are pretty hot (sorry, I had to :tongue: ).
     
  12. SpeedoGuy

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    MZ:

    Nice post.

    You are a model in more ways than you may know.
     
  13. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Amazon sales rank is up to #9.

    Woo-hoo! Get mentioned on LPSG and get results!
     
  14. davidjh7

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    We are at a more technologically complex point in history than ever before, we have more social, physical and mental challenges than ever before, and yet we are totally limiting imagination, experimentation, and open mindedness for the sake of liability and political correctness. I made black powder the first time at 12 with the chemicals in my GOlbert chemistry set, and some potassium nitrate I was able to get at the drugstore. I got the formula from the encyclopedia. DId I cause damage or hurt anybody? NO! Why? Because I had the ability and motivation to learn how to handle experiments safely,and not be stupid about it. Science and imagination were encouraged. Now, we limit information and supplies, such that only people like BAM can get ahold of the equipment, and show how stupid they can be with it. Google "The Little Golden Book of Chemistry". It is now banned in this country. Google "The Radioactive Boyscout". I don't agree with his methodology, but consider how CREATIVE and intellegent, and resourceful he had to be to accomplish what he did. Now, we teach kids how to spout off the pablam fed to them about who was picked on most in history, and yet they still go out and bully each other and drvie each other to the Columbines and the Va. Tech's, because we can;t be bothered to discipline our children or ourselves, to respect each other, and understand CONSEQUENCES of our actions....If people went back to learning that you CAN suffer consequences for being stupid, you CAN get hurt, and learned it early, maybe we wouldn;t have so many Darwin award people running amok in our society....OK--end of rant.
     
  15. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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  16. ClaireTalon

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    From what I see, I wouldn't take the book too seriously, but I wouldn't completely dismiss it either. Maybe it'd make a nice present idea, if you really can't think of anything else.

    What I don't see is the system in the mixture of contents: On the one hand, the book deals with practical things, such as knots, wrapping a present or placing a splint, on the other hand it deals with history (Battle of Waterloo, the Somme, and then with games: palming a coin, write in invisible ink, and then with things that you don't need nowadays anymore, such as tanning a skin. Interesting things if they're taken for themselves, but making one book about all of these? Wouldn't that be a little too wide a vary of subjects?
     
  17. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    A good review from Christina Hoff Summers, who - though obviously a girl - is evidently what H.G.Wells would have called "[SIZE=-1]that more intelligent sort of girl who likes boys' games and books" (Little Wars, 1913).[/SIZE]

    SNIPS & SNAILS By CHRISTINA HOFF SOMMERS - Opinion | Editorials | Op-Ed Articles

    Some reviewers at Amazon express disappointment that it's obviously an English book, given a mild once-over to make it more topical out in the colonies. I haven't seen it yet, myself. But that accounts for it having the history of Waterloo rather than Gettysgurg or Mobile Bay or Lake Erie or Bunker Hill; and I suppose they'll mess up the stuff about baseball. Well, no dangerous book is perfect.
     
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