Speak English!

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Rugbypup, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. Rugbypup

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  2. D_Doewell Dadong

    D_Doewell Dadong New Member

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  3. Vestigial

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    A lot of this seems to get used, or was used in Australia too.
     
  4. TurkeyWithaSunburn

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    There are a few of my favorite chatters that come to mind and I might have to keep that as a basic thesaurus. Since they insist on being British, knowing I'm just a lowly colonist. You know I'd swear they were "full of beans" (American version) when they start into the Britspeak.
     
  5. Sergeant_Torpedo

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    American slang is very anodine. British slang still retains some invective, but its over use (for shock purposes) by media luvvies is devaluing our once rich language. Blaspheming eight year olds in the supermarket isn't as amusing as their parents seem to think it is. I still adore the quintessentially cogent British, "Bugger off!" last heard a fortnight ago when a well spoken and well dressed elderly English lady gave short shrift to an arrogant and heavily armed police officer who hadn't the manners to move his carcas, so that people had to step into the road to pass him. I could have kissed her but didn't - fearing the verbal battering I might have received. Ha!
     
  6. TurkeyWithaSunburn

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    Now would that be an American lady or a British Lady. :tongue::biggrin: A slight but significant difference.:eek:
     
  7. D_Kissimmee Coldsore

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    I don't agree with their listing of ass as backside. Ass is only a donkey in British English. It's arse. Ass my arse!
     
  8. midlifebear

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    List does not include "getting one's kit off." Therefore, what kind of reliable list can it be?
     
  9. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    It's bumpershooting men.

    Cheers.
     
  10. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Still doesn't say what the hell a stone is. It's a measure of weight they all use to refer to how much people weigh. "Oh I'm 12 stone."

    WTF? I'd let it slide but they endlessly complain about us keeping the old avoirdupois and English measurement systems. Leave it to the Brits to complain about someone else using what they themselves invented.
     
  11. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    I have never, and I'm usually good at these things, been able to translate that.
     
  12. D_Kissimmee Coldsore

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    It's 14lbs but I'm sure you knew that. It's quite generational though, us younger Brits are more metrically inclined.
     
  13. B_Nick8

    B_Nick8 New Member

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    Seriously, buddy. And you think my elementary school training extended to the 14's tables??

    This is America.
     
  14. D_Relentless Original

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    I love the expression " I was absolutely Bladderd". Or i was as pissed as a newt, the best for me was " I was Plastered". all expressions for being really drunk. Again i think its which part of the country you come from, my partner is from the south and i am north, when i told him i was out plastered last night, he thought i had done some building work!!!.
     
  15. Jason

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    Just get the older generation on currency.

    The basic unit was the penny, called d. The d was divided into half and quarters. There were 1/4 and 1/2 d coins, the 1d, 3d and 6d. 12d was one shilling. 20s was one pound, so a pound was 240d. Before calculators all prices needed to be converted into farthings for multiplication. There was also a guinea which was 21s. Actually we still use the guinea to sell horses.

    Weights were easy. 16oz to 1 pound (written lb). 14lb to one stone. So a stone is 224oz.

    We use gallons too, but the imperial gallon is a bit different to the US gallon. Petrol (US=gas) is sold by the litre but we still talk of miles per gallon.

    More seriously British Isles slang retains a strong regional basis - the idea of a single British slang is a non starter. We also have town/country differences and class differences. Everyone can recognise someone not from their area and not from their class. Determining the areas is more of a challenge, but often people can do it. There are still parts of the British Isles where small-area reagional accents have remained distinct - Scotland, Ireland, parts of N and W England.
     
  16. D_Kissimmee Coldsore

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    I never knew that, thanks for the explanation.

    Grampa!
     
  17. Calboner

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  18. B_mitchymo

    B_mitchymo New Member

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    Am i bovvered? I'll send to Coventry anyone who gives this list a credit. Pointless bagwank if ever i heard.
     
  19. D_Relentless Original

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    Love to know how that saying of send him to coventry came about mitch
     
  20. Sergeant_Torpedo

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    Supposedly originating during England's civil war in the 17th century when the Parlimentarians ostracised Royalists to the cathedral town of Coventry. I am not sure if this is the meaning; more likely to do with the guilds and early industrialization of the city when those workers who ingratiated themselves with exploiting employers were exluded from socializing with their honest brethren. Workers in other cities adopted the social sanction of sending their colleagues to Coventry. Sadly still practised in the UK, but a very cogent indication of how the recipient has offended social proriety.
     
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