Steele Crazy After All These Years

Discussion in 'Politics' started by sargon20, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. sargon20

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    Opps it was Bush's war........as usual facts get in the way. They do have a liberal bias....Can he survive yet another spectacular gaffe?

    Republicans are furious with RNC Chairman Michael Steele, who was caught on camera saying that the war in Afghanistan is a doomed effort launched by President Obama.

    Top Republicans Pile On Steele, Call For His Ouster

     
  2. ColoradoGuy

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    Not a good day for Mr. Steele... however, I'm not convinced he was ever a good choice to run the RNC. The criticisms of him outlined on Wikipedia are not all recent nor are they few:

    • On March 4, 2009, Politico reported that "key party leaders are worried that the GOP has made a costly mistake" in electing Steele. They cited his leadership dispute with Limbaugh; a willingness to support other Republicans in primaries against the three Republican senators (Olympia Snowe, Susan Collins, Arlen Specter) who voted in favor of the stimulus package; an offering of "some slum love" to Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, his calling civil unions "crazy"; his common usage of hip hop slang; and reaching out to "one-armed midgets".[50]

    • Ada Fisher, "one of a handful of black Republican National Committee members and a persistent critic of Mr. Steele's, called on him to resign, arguing in an e-mail message to the entire committee that he 'makes us frankly appear to many blacks as quite foolish'", according to The New York Times on March 7, 2009. The article nonetheless concluded that "a mass revolt by members ... so far seems unlikely."

    • On March 12, 2009, GQ published an interview in which Steele said abortion is "absolutely... an individual choice", to be decided at the state level.[51] Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell, the Christian Coalition,[52] and Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council criticized Steele's remarks.[53] In response to his GOP critics, Steele told Gentleman's Quarterly, "I ask God, 'Hey, let me show just a little bit of love, so I absolutely don't go out and kick this person's ass'".[54]

    • In August 2009, Steele drew the ire of many Republicans after he apparently agreed with conservative talk radio host Vincent David Jericho's harsh criticism of Republican Missouri Representative Roy Blunt, stating: "I agree with you. And when stuff gets in the crapper, you gotta clean it out." Steele did not specifically defend Blunt or other Republican leaders from Jericho's criticism during the interview. Blunt's former chief of staff, Gregg Hartley, referred to Steele as "an idiot" and stated that he would contribute to "the effort to oust" Steele. Hartley later said Steele should apologize to Blunt and resign. Jericho said in an interview that he did not interpret Steele's comments as being specific to anyone.[55]

    • On September 1, 2009, Steele drew considerable criticism when holding a town hall meeting at Howard University. He was starting to discuss health care when a woman got up and shouted, "My mother died of cancer six months ago because she could only afford three of her six prescription chemotherapy medications." She continued, "Everyone in this room and everyone in this country should have access to good healthcare." In response, Steele admonished her for raising her voice, insisted that that he too supported healthcare for all, raised his fists in imitation of protesters and said, "When people go out to town halls, they go out to the community, and they're like this. It makes for great TV. You'll probably make it tonight. Enjoy it."[56][57][58]

    • Steele referred to a letter written by the late Senator Ted Kennedy, which President Barack Obama had read as part of an address to joint session of Congress, as a "political tool". This drew criticism from DCCC chairman Chris Van Hollen, who referred to Steele's comments as "outlandish".[59]

    • On December 22, 2009, the Washington Times reported that Steele was using his position as RNC chair to personally profit by charging fees for speeches and appearance of up to $20,000 (plus expenses for first class travel), and that this was an unusual and perhaps an unprecedented practice. Three former party chairmen, Frank J. Fahrenkopf, Jr., Jim Nicholson, and Richard Bond voiced strong disapproval of Steele saying variously that making speeches for free was part of the job of RNC chair, and that taking money gave the "appearance of impropriety". Steele's office responded that he was following all the RNC rules, and was committed full time to his job. The RNC's attorney said that Steele was not violating the rules, but would not say whether Steele had consulted him regarding the speeches for pay.[60]

    • The head of the North Carolina Republican Party, Tom Fetzer, has called for Steele to resign. Fetzer said Steele's resignation is "the only way to end scrutiny of the national party over lavish spending and ensure Republicans maximize gains during the mid-term elections." [61]

    • Steele has been under fire from GOP activists for his lavish spending, but he told them that he has accepted responsibility for his mistakes and is ready to move on.[62
    And finally...

    • In July 2010, neoconservative author William Kristol called for Steele to resign following comments Steele made that the Afghan war was "a war of Obama's choosing" and "not something the United States had actively prosecuted or wanted to engage in." [63] The War in Afghanistan was initiated by George W. Bush in October 2001 in retaliation for the September 11 attacks on New York City and Washington D.C. Afghanistan is also the likely location of Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. [64] Former Bush adviser Karl Rove referred to Steele's comment as "boneheaded".[65] John McCain, Arizona Senator and Republican nominee for president in the 2008 election, withdrew his support from Steele, calling Steele's comments "wildly inaccurate... there is no excuse for them", saying "I think that Mr. Steele is going to have to assess as to whether he can still lead the Republican Party as chairman of the Republican National Committee."[66] McCain's comments have been echoed by Senator Jim DeMint, who said Steele should "apologise to our military, all the men and women who've been fighting in Afghanistan" and Senator Lindsey Graham who said "It was an uninformed, unnecessary, unwise, untimely comment. This is not President Obama's war, this is America's war. We need to stand behind the president." Former Vice President Dick Cheney's daughter Elizabeth Cheney has also called for Steele to resign. Congressman Ron Paul has come out in support of Steele, however, saying "Michael Steele has it right, and Republicans should stick by him."[67]
    You can read Mr. Steele's complete Wikipedia entry here...
     
  3. TomCat84

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    Ironically enough, what he said was basically true- but for the part about it being Obama's war.
     
  4. SilverTrain

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    Which is apparently why he's getting the boot!
     
  5. B_VinylBoy

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    Oh, it's a lot more than that.
    Quite frankly, I'm surprised Steele has survived this long as the RNC Chairman.
     
  6. Bbucko

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    The war in Afghanistan was supported almost universally initially. As the Taliban were offering asylum to Osama bin Laden, it could be viewed as a "just war": even I supported it.

    The war in Iraq, while still receiving bipartisan support, was a somewhat messier affair; I disagreed with both my then-partner and my sister (maybe the only time they agreed on anything) in declining to support it. Saddam. however evil, had nothing to do with 9/11, which was the only justification I could understand for engaging in two wars simultaneously. Iraq quickly overshadowed Afghanistan, and with a loathsome sort of ADD on the part of Bush's two administrations, Afghanistan was allowed to go fallow.

    Neglect is the prime reason why we're still there, along with the fact that, much like Iraq, no exit strategy was ever devised and no real goals were ever assigned to our invasion by which we might eventually withdraw after having accomplished them.

    It's a terrible, horrible fact that the war continues, troops are being killed and wounded daily, and it's only been in the last 18 months or so that we've seen any real progress in many many years there. Plus there's Karzai, who really doesn't have the full faith and confidence of the President, either, and for good reason.

    It's a mess that we, as a nation owns. It wasn't Obama's war (though he approved of it), it wasn't really Bush's war (though his first administration was responsible for the invasion). It is everybody's war, and it's one I don't see us ending without a loss of prestige, either at home or abroad.
     
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