Super-Duper Tuesday is over. What happens Now?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by swordfishME, Feb 6, 2008.

  1. swordfishME

    swordfishME Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2006
    Messages:
    947
    Likes Received:
    2
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    DFW Texas
    Super Tuesday is over.

    Republicans: Huckabee played spoiler for Romney and it seems McCain has the nomination all sewn up. Which is in a way good for the Republicans, because they needed to get a somewhat-middle-of-the-road candidate to stand a chance in November.

    Democrats: This is is fast becoming a mess. Unless something drastic happens soon, I don't think that either Clinton or Obama will have enough delegates to clinch the nomination even after all the primaries are over. It will then dissolve into a He Said-She Said mess that will have to be somehow sorted out at the convention.

    What does everyone think?
     
  2. Northland

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Messages:
    6,082
    Likes Received:
    4
    The Democratic Party long ago (2000) decided that Hillary would be their leader this year. They knew that she had to strengthen her legitimate political legs and that meant a term as a Senator. Yes, she had been politically involved and connected for years-she, herself has spoken of her '35 years' of service, which of course was mostly steering along her husband WJC; but, she needed a political record of here own in order to legitimize her run.

    The Democratic Party even knew they'd need some sort of contender to be scooting along (just barely) in back of her. Don't for a second fool yourself into some misguided belief that the Dems plan to allow Obama a full win. Neither Clinton nor Obama will have the necessary number of delegates to secure the nomination on their own. The future is as such: A lengthy convention will go back and forth and arguing the world (no, not the wonderful documentary with Daniel Bell, Irving Howe, Irving Kristol and Nathan Glazer) among other things. In the end, Obama will in gentlemanly fashion concede (pretend) that Clinton is indeed the best thing to ever come down the pike and tell us how we should all support her.


    Later, in November, Clinton will suffer the full wrath of all Republicans. No, they don't turn out in primaries as heartily as Democrats, they do however arrive for general elections. No Republican wants a Clinton. They are not thrilled by McCain; he has however, managed to be somewhat conservative and he is a longtime Republican-that being the key to their voting for him. I submit that, McCain could say 'abortions for all and homosexual marriages everywhere' and he would win as long as he is listed as a Republican. Democrats I have found, are more likely and willing to cross party lines in elections than are Democrats.

    In addition to the Republicans who will not vote for Clinton, there will be the Democrats who loathe Clinton for her at times right-wing leanings. They will then see McCain, who until about now, has been much more center and at times even left-leaning, this will give them pause and then cause to select him as their next President.

    The Democrats have created a bigger mess than they had ever thought possible. Clinton goes about with a general sense of entitlement (look at Michigan and Florida) and the Democratic Party, rather than put her in her place allows it. (After all, to smack her would be to smack their god, Bill Clinton-which would mean death to Howard Dean) I believe the Dems never saw the level of ego which Hillary Clinton would display. Neither did they realize that there would be a serious contender (Obama) who would have such wide range appeal. Unfortunately they are now in their self-made quagmire and there is no easy way out, if any way out.

    Where does it leave us in the end? 60% chance (I never guarentee anything) of next January watching term #3 of Republican leadership in the form of Johnny McCain and his Veep Mike Huckabee (Huckabee is the key to securing Republican votes, since: A)He can grab the conservatives and fundamentalists and B)McCain is getting up in years, the relative youth of Huckabee will balance that on the campaign trail). It'll be a squeaker; but, McCain/Huckabee will win over Clinton and her baggage.
     
  3. HazelGod

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    7,531
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    9
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Other Side of the Pillow
    I'm not sure I agree with your contention that the Dems have been planning to put that cunt up front all along...but your analysis of the results of such an eventuality is dead-on, in my opinion. Selecting her as their nominee would be the best thing the party could do to shoot itself in the foot this time around.
     
  4. Catchoftheday

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    18,300
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    On the other side
    Well it looks like pooper-scooper wednesday from here :tongue:
     
  5. B_InDepth

    B_InDepth New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    around
    i am fully convinced that there is no hope.. the election is a scam.. there is nothing you are i can do about any of it.. a kid, 16 years old at my meet-up group last night hacked into diabold in 10 minutes... just to show it can be done.. and he said anyone with a basic knowledge of accounting programing could change the results...

    i think the mexicans are dumb to jump the fence into America..! im gunna jump the fence into mexico and be a cabanna boy.
     
  6. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2002
    Messages:
    83,922
    Likes Received:
    34
    Just two of our presidents have come directly from the Senate: Warren G. Harding in 1920 and John F. Kennedy in 1960. Another 13 former senators have made it to the White House since 1789 but indirectly, usually through the vice presidency. And in the past 50 years, senators have suffered some of the worst defeats on record.

    According to the Senatorial Curse, our next President may well be a Huckabee, a Romney or a Bloomberg.
     
  7. B_ScaredLittleBoy

    B_ScaredLittleBoy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,337
    Likes Received:
    8
    I make pancakes every day for a further seven days. I like pancakes.
     
  8. faceking

    faceking Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2004
    Messages:
    7,443
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mavs, NOR * CAL
    riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight.
     
  9. midlifebear

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2007
    Messages:
    5,908
    Likes Received:
    11
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Nevada, Buenos Aires, and Barçelona
    I predict Thomas E. Dewey will win the next presidency.
     
  10. davec94

    davec94 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2007
    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    5
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    London, UK
    i don't think there was any big conspiracy theories around it, but if you look at how many super-delegates pledged to Hillary early on you can see that there is a large (much larger than Obama) party establishment base hoping that she wins. Obama's only hope is to pick up enough pledged delegates and undecided supers before the DNC.
     
  11. losangelestim

    losangelestim Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Messages:
    298
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    20
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Springfield, Oregon
    it's a battle royale to the conventions in denver and minneapolis. it's all about delagates now. this is my favorite part of american politics.
     
  12. Industrialsize

    Staff Member Moderator Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Messages:
    24,279
    Albums:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2,113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    United States
    Are you a Conspiracy theory kind of guy???

    Actually, once super delegates have "committed themselves" to a candiadate, they are NOT locked in.Most of the ones committed to Hillary Clinton, did so long ago when she was seen as the Inevitable nominee, long before the idea that Barack Obama was considered a viable candidate for the nomination. They CAN change their minds at ANY time, including the night of the convention when they have to vote. Hypothetically, say Barack Obama goes into the convention with MORE pledged(delegates won in the primaries) delegates than Senator Clinton. Now super delegates are the Big Wigs of the party, for instance, all memebrs of congress, democratic governors etc. I think the LAST thing the Democratic Party wants is for it to look like the voters in the Democratic party have chosen one candidate, the one with the most Pledged delegates, and for the bigwigs(superdelegates) to say they are wrong and override the will of the people and throw their support behind Hillary Clinton. Remember, most super delegates are ELECTED officials and their votes would be public. Elected officials are obsessed with being RE-ELECTED and they would have to answer to their constituents for their vote for the candidate with less pledged delegates...
     
  13. HazelGod

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
    Messages:
    7,531
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    9
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Other Side of the Pillow
  14. B_InDepth

    B_InDepth New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    4
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    around
  15. Gillette

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2006
    Messages:
    8,309
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    14
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
  16. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    14,610
    Likes Received:
    5
    Too early to say whether either will have enough. Obama could be quite significantly ahead by the time of the convention -- and if he is, many of those super delegates will vote for him rather than invite the wrath of party members and contempt of the voting public by defeating the popular will within the party.
    I don't say he will be ahead ... just that he clearly could be.
    This whole primary season has been unpredictable.

    A McCain victory wouldn't surprise me or bother me that much, though I do hope the Dems win.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted