Tax On Soft Drinks?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by nudeyorker, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. nudeyorker

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    Watching the national news and now they want to put a tax on sweetened soft drinks under the guise that it will make obese people drink less sugared beverages.
    My questions...
    1. How much sugared soft drinks do you drink in a month?
    2. Would adding sixteen cents per can make you drink less?
    3. Do you think the US government really cares about obese people consuming
    less sugar?
    4. Should non-obese people be able to get a tax break on soda if this is their
    justification?


    Don't get me wrong I drink about five soft drinks a month. So it's not going to alter my cola consumption...but this tax thing is starting to get crazy. We have to raise the money somehow...but don't treat us like fools that you actually care about anything except the revenue.
     
  2. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    In Ontario we already have this... doesn't stop anyone.
     
  3. thadjock

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    so is that why they tax my income,

    they want me to work less?
     
  4. Mem

    Mem
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    So are Diet sodas not taxed under this plan? They shouldn't be, and that's all I drink. I drink diet soda every day.

    They don't care about health, they care about money. People will still keep buying sodas.
     
  5. TurkeyWithaSunburn

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    :laughing: good one thad :biggrin:

    An excise tax on high fructose corn syrup sweetened drinks? Well gosh Gatorade would be taxed too. Depending on the locale you live in, you might not pay any tax on sugar carbonated beverages. Depends on the state, county and city. Locally I the sales tax can be as high as 8.9% depending on which metro city you're in. On food it's usually less.

    I can't wait for the MEAT tax to get people to stop eating all of those precious edible tame animals. :biggrin1: (rimshot please)
    Although it is rather curious to note that during WWII I think it was in Denmark when meat was severely rationed that heart attacks etc went down substantially.
     
  6. midlifebear

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    Interesting tax. Although many will disagree with me, this "type" of tax is basically a "sin" tax. It's a sin to be obese. I'm sort of on the fence. I don't drink the drink that refreshes or makes the whole world want to sing. And I'm not part of an annoyingly perky generation defined by it's preference for a particular cola even when peppered with a doctor's name. The closest I've ever become addicted to soft drinks is when I developed a dangerous taste for Blue Moons while tending bar at Olaf's in Berkeley back in 1973. That "sour press" from the fountain drink dispenser almost became a mean monkey on my back. Thank god I had plenty of cock to suck whenever I felt the need for a drink or a cigarette!

    As I'm fond of exclaiming the many wonders of my home, The Silver State, we've got a reasonably high sales tax on just about everything -- except food. But it's higher for stuff considered non-food items such as candy bars, soda, beer, wine, whiskey, vodka, etc. And we also tax food served in restaurants. WE fiigure if you''ve got enough money to spend in a restaurant you might as well pay tax on it. But staples -- which is everything that is not candy, softdrinks, ice cream, etc., are left alone. A pound of ground round for $1.89 costs $1.89. The mormon caucus (those of the Nevada Legislature who are LDS) try to float a bill for regular sales tax on everything, including income. But those guys never last long in the state legislature. And except in special circumstances (last year, for example) our legislature only meets once every two years. Last year there were some budget problems, but they seem to be sort of under control.

    So, go ahead and tax sodas with sugar, high fructose corn syrup or regular disaccharride. And for those who drink "diet" sodas, impose a chemical use tax, because I'm certain the chemicals used to create a faux sweetness are just as dangerous in the long run. Remember cyclamate? That really caused the sugar beet, sugar cane, and corn syrup folks to get into a tizzy because sodas "sweetened" with cyclamates tasted identical to those sweetened with sugar. Nine out of ten folks couldn't tell the difference. So, they were "discovered" to be carcinogenic, but not as carcinogenic as saccharine. So, tax the sugars and the chemicals, too. And while we're at it, let's double the death tax.
     
  7. nudeyorker

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    Interesting points midlifebear however the non-sugar soft drinks seem to be exempt despite...
    The Dangers of Aspartame
    I think sugar is far less dangerous in the long run. It's a shame we can't tax stupidity!
     
  8. jakeatolla

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    They should ban the crap. Its killing people and the government doesn't
    do a damn thing.
     
  9. lucky8

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    so much for "no new taxes."
     
  10. nudeyorker

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    Interesting idea however consider this... banning everything that is killing people... what would that do to the current economic structure? As a side...I was having lunch with friends in 1978 and the topic of conversation was that everything on the table was somehow going to kill us with the exception of the water. All of us are still alive. Maybe moderation is the answer.
     
  11. Mem

    Mem
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    What about cigarettes, when used as directed they cause death.
     
  12. transformer_99

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    Agree, cavities and a little extra tire around the middle is far less dangerous than being fed wonder foods that are contrived and manufactured that also have proven to cause cancer in lab settings & studies.

    As it is, soda is overpriced. You can go to McDonald's and get a burger for $ .49 or a cheeseburger for $ .59, but french fries are going to run you over a dollar and as much as $ 2.25 for super sized. Soft drinks are priced like that, it's how they make their money in fast food. Coinversely, you can go to Wal-Mart and for $ .69, get 2 litres of Sam's cola. In the case of Wal-Mart, I can see the price jump on soda. But for a fast food restaurant, or even any of these chain restaurants selling you soda for what they do, it would be wiser for them to try to raise their tax thru the food instead of an already ridiculous price for a soda.

    Just me, but I drink the energy drinks if I have to pay $ 2 or more. Rock Star Pomegranate is my favorite. At least Rock Star Pom is 50% real fruit juice. Red Bull sucks ! at least Rock Star Juiced you get something that might be good for you in some capacity ?
     
  13. Mem

    Mem
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  14. nudeyorker

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    You don't have to sell me, I start everyday with a shake made with fresh papaya, whey, yogurt, granola and guava juice and crushed ice...but I drink red wine with pizza so what do I know?
    My question I think you answered ... people who are consuming high intake of fast food and/or processed food high in fat and sugar; the sugared soft drink is going to have little effect on the outcome of a healthy life. So why not just say we are putting a sin tax on sugared soft drinks? Because if they cared about everyones health almost everything would have to be taxed.
     
  15. MarkLondon

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    Most overweight people I know drink diet sodas. Which I don't think does them any good. I avoid them because they give me hypoglycemia - my mouth tastes something sweet, my pancreas releases insulin, the sugar never arrives and I get faint.
     
  16. chadstallion

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    works for me.
    haven't had a 'soft drink' in years.
    same for cigarette tax; fine by me. dont smoke.
     
  17. Mem

    Mem
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    If they didn't drink diet soda they would gain another 20 to 30 pounds per year or more.
     
  18. nudeyorker

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    Not necessarily... some studies have shown that the chemicals in diet soft drinks actually stimulate the appetite.
    http://www.untergeek.com/?p=560
     
  19. conclave27

    conclave27 Member

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    Would be more productive if they find a way to decrease the price of healthier food items. Already in California we pay a CRV tax on any drink in a can, plastic or glass bottle. This is a ridiculous and unfair tax just like the old "Tea Tax". What is next a water tax? An air tax?
    And as many people pointed out.... Diet Soda should be taxed as well, as long with gatorade, must energy drinks etc. A can of red bull is no more healthier than a can of RC. Not to mention all the juices and punches too. That means lemonades, instant iced teas, and other mixes, not to mention most of the frozen juice isle. Wow this is invasive legislation.
     
  20. Bbucko

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    My non-alcoholic beverage of choice is unsweetened tepid black tea. It's got a real jolt, keeps the urinary tract clean and is cheap as hell (I spend about $7 per month on tea); as an added benefit, I'm told that it is full of antioxidants, and I'll take all the healthy I can get.

    I kinda dropped out of the high-fructose corn syrup thing back in the 70s when I was still a teen: no condiments (ketchup is red sugar water), no sugary cereals, no pre-packaged heat-and-serve bullshit, and very few soft drinks. I've tried to keep my foods simple and "whole" as much as possible. It digests most easily and doesn't have anything I don't personally add. It's always just made sense to me, like shopping everyday for the dinner I prepare that night. I keep very little food in the house.

    My food cravings run more toward carbs and fats than sweets: breads, cheeses, etc. Aside from milk, I've always been a big dairy fan.

    I personally find sin taxes to be an expression of puritanical impulses that are equally a product of left and right social engineering schemes. As someone who has always had a strong issue with arbitrary flexing of authority and the singling out of any one group as deserving of greater social penalties than another, I find them abhorrent.
     
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