Teaching As A Profession

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by chicagosam, Apr 17, 2011.

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Would you enter or reccommend anyone entering the teaching profession today?

  1. Yes

    12 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. No

    12 vote(s)
    50.0%
  1. chicagosam

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    #1 chicagosam, Apr 17, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
  2. pleasureboy

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    I work in education, albeit more international than K-12, but I don't know that I'd recommend it to most people for a career.

    It can be very enjoyable, but the people who 'run it' are for the most parts idiots who have degrees taught by other idiots on how to be an idiot. They generally don't have more than a basic grasp of the subject they teach and most seem to show little interest in changing that.

    Even with changes that would completely overhaul the existing system you'd still be looking forward to a career of working with nothing but petty, lazy, uninformed people who just don't care and it's that more than the pay or other things that makes working in education in the US such a blah option.
     
  3. nudeyorker

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    It's difficult for me to say really; I discontinued being a teacher and I worked in a great school with support and funds but because I just really did not have the calling and my heart was not in it. But I think that if someone does have it and is willing to try to help bring about change knowing the challenges then yes I would because I admire many teachers who help make a difference in the lives of so many.
    So I would have to vote No for myself and Perhaps for others.
     
    #3 nudeyorker, Apr 17, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
  4. sagifan

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    Students are not held as accountable for their OWN learning as they were in years past. In addition some parents don't provide their kids with the skills necessary (before entering school) for them to thrive in any classroom. My neighbor's kid is 14 and reads worse than my 2nd grade nephew. How can as student who reads at the level be allowed to enter the 8th grade!!! (The neighbor kid is in 8th grade) To my knowledge he isnt in special education classes. By the way this same kid can't tell time on a clock unless its digital, and doesn't know his "multiplication table".
    This kid is raised by middle income parents with college degrees. His parents keep nice clothes on him, he has a cell phone (an Iphone), and English is his native language. What things does this kid lack that wouldn't enable him to be successful in school???

    Think about the students that come from homes/families with less financial resources, or education....

    When it comes to teachers...I know several who teach what they know...people with bachelors degrees in the content areas that they teach. These people then went BACK to college and got masters degrees in education...Having a former Biologist, Chemist, or Engineer as my kid's science or math teacher seems like the way to go...thats just me...but I don't have kids yet
    ...One other thing...private schools...the teachers there arent required by the state to be licensed teachers...why? Because those schools don't get government funding, and their school's arent penalized for poor student performance like public schools. (google - No Child Left Behind).
    Education does need an overhaul. 50% should be reorganizing the teachers, and school leaders to make sure that they are providing quality education to our nations students. The other 50% of the overhaul should be placed on the students and their parents/guardians. They should be assessed at least 2 times each year to measure academic growth, insufficient growth = not passing to the next grade. Parents should be required to attend regular conferences with teachers or should show some other amount of involvement in the educational development of their children.
    My answers may not be the solution, but maybe with those changes the students in my college biology classes would leave their secondary education experience with the ability to correctly pronounce and spell mitochondria, and maybe even define it in a well written sentence.
     
  5. midlifebear

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    Back in the Cretaceous Period I taught a combined 4th/5th grade class of 40 students, most of whom had marginal English skills (but were usually several grades ahead of their 'Mericuhn born English-speaking peers). As anyone who is a teacher or has taught, the key to a successful career as a teacher your school's principal. It's the principal that sets the tone and fights the fights for students and teachers, keeping us away from our school boards.

    I loved teaching. I was sick almost every day for five years and I never had three months off in the summer. Those types of school years are mostly a thing of the past. And if I could stand the smell of the little buggers after they fart their brains out after school lunch and afternoon recess, I'd probably consider doing it all over again. I'm rather proud of the fact that all of my students were prepared to matriculate to the next grade level; a feat similar to herding wild dogs and getting them to trust you.

    But the US Government hasn't even tried to cover up the fact that they do not want an educated electorate. God forbid the majority of the citizens of the USA have a solid knowledge of US History, the Constitution, read beyond an 8th grade level, and do little more than use a calculator in engineering mode.

    Personally, I think every citizen at the age of 18 be required to serve their community, county, state, etc., helping the poor, do pubic works, intern at a library, school board, and especially be required to spend one year as a teacher's assistant at the elementary and intermediate level. But that would require public school graduates be able to think and reflect upon their past and future. In the USA I don't think anyone wants that. Instead, we rely on appliances such as televisions and personal computers to tell us what to think.
     
  6. ColonialBoy

    ColonialBoy Member

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    For various reasons I'm about to start a 1 year teaching degree after completing a B.Sc. many years ago.

    I've worked in IT for decades and have job burnout, I've always worked in capital city CBD. Teaching will all me to move to country/coastal areas & do something new.
     
  7. B_Hickboy

    B_Hickboy New Member

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    I wouldn't take a job in any institution whose rules were calculated to deny me the respect and dignity that all human beings deserve. Teachers should be venerated, yet they are abused. LeBron James makes $14,500,000 a year. I have a friend I've known for over 50 years who has made her career as a math teacher, and is a damn good one. She has gotten advanced degrees and continues her education even as she approaches retirement. She makes less than $50,000 a year. What she does has great value. I won't debate the worth of what LeBron James does, but it is a grotesquely lopsided world if an entertainer makes so much money and a teacher makes so little.

    Nope, I wouldn't take a job as a teacher. The administrative bullshit would kill me. There isn't enough joy in it, and there damn sure isn't enought money. Wouldn't recommend the job to anyone else, either.
     
  8. molotovmuffin

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  9. Hoss

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    If that's the path a person wants, then I say go for it. an ex-wife taught 4th graders for 15 yrs, then went to teaching history at the high school level & has been there 16 yrs., she loves it. A friend of mine recently retired after 28 yrs. teaching h.s. English, and misses it.
     
  10. JonathanQ

    JonathanQ Member

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    I taught successfully on the high school level for forty years. I enjoyed my students, ended up teaching grandchildren of my first students, and retired only because I realized I was working very hard for "free." The single biggest drawback: politics. In the school and from the state. I'm so thankful I escaped before all the most recent crap was instituted from on high. Why does government think it knows how to educate kids? NCLB is a monstrous failure of teaching/testing, teaching/testing, ad infinitum. Would I recommend teaching as a profession? No. Not now.
     
  11. helgaleena

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    Some have the gift of teaching, and enjoy it. Those people will continue to teach no matter how screwed up the profession seems.

    My mother was a teacher and loved it. Most people tell me I should have gone into it, but it requires more extroversion and tolerance of fellow humans than I possess.
     
  12. b.c.

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    Minus two points for the spelling :wink: ...and to answer your question: FUCK no!
     
  13. Frodo46888

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    Until recently, I might have encouraged a young person to go into teaching, but recent events have changed my mind. States are now enacting legislation to strip teachers of collective bargaining rights, leaving their employment open to the whims of elected school boards and politicians. Public pension plans are also being reduced. Modest salaries were once balanced with some security, but no longer.

    We'll end up getting what we deserve: some schools in wealthy districts with well-qualified, well-paid professionals and the rest staffed with people who can't find employment anywhere else. A bigger wedge driven between the "haves" and the "have-nots".
     
  14. Bbucko

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    Teaching is a calling. As such, one never teaches for the money or respect, as the profession doesn't really come through with either of those things. Anyone seriously contemplating a career as an educator understands that going in.

    I, myself, would make a terrible teacher: I really don't like most kids. I'm not nearly diplomatic or patient enough, either.

    But if someone I knew had such a goal, I'd do anything I could to encourage it (presuming that that person understood the reality of a teacher's life). The world needs more people who are passionate about what they do, and an effective teacher needs to have a passion about his/her career.
     
  15. bigbull29

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    Some of the teachers I know personally are some of the biggest anti-intellectuals out there. Isn't that ironic, don't you think? Just like universities seem to be all about sports nowadays (always thought sports and universities were like oil and water).

    What screams on the surface screams just the opposite underneath. Have I entered the Twilight Zone, I ask? :eek:

    I love teaching, but only adults, et ce à l'étranger uniquement.:biggrin1:
     
  16. august86

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    In one of my first business ethics lectures, our lecturer posed a very interesting question to us. If these days all the top students are studying business, medicine etc, who's becoming teachers? Are we entrusting the education and formation of our children to average (some who barely graduated high school) people? Really had me thinking... :eek:

    Well, my mom and several members of my family are or were teachers at one or other time in their lives, and I think it has given me tremendous respect for the profession.

    The dedication, passion and determination that she (my mom) has for teaching has really inspired me and shown me that teaching really is a calling.

    I've even realistically considered teaching as a profession and forgo my ideals of grandeur in the business world, and who knows, maybe I'll take that route one day.

    However:
    There's so many unhappy people in the teaching profession, which is highly evident by the way they treat their pupils/students (I'm sure we've all had the pleasure of meeeting a few in school, lol). They don't realise that the actual teaching is but the smallest part of their job. Their role is to inspire their students to want more for their lives, and therefore to have the internal motivation to drive them to greater achievements in life.


    Teachers are not as well-paid as some executives, but lets face it, it's not something you do for the money/benefits. Although, you're guaranteed of 4 recesses per year (besides your ordinary leave/sick leave etc), so lets be realistic, you won't be paid the same as someone that barely gets public holidays off from work, and to whom leave is begrudgingly granted every year.

    Either way, if you're going to join the teaching profession, then for goodness sake, do it with dedication and a real passion that your students will relate to and translate into success
     
  17. Novaboy

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    I think it really varries from country to country. In Canada the average salary for a teacher with 10 years experience is about 90,000 a year. I met a waitress in Utah who went back into waitressing because she made more money than when she was a teacher. She could not belive how high the salary is in Canada. I love my job.
     
  18. D_pxN6c

    D_pxN6c New Member

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    I'm thinking about leaving healthcare to become a teacher. . .
     
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