The Crime Funnel

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by IntoxicatingToxin, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Why don't people report freakn CRIMES?! I don't get it. An injustice happens, and you just let it go? Especially major crimes like rape 'n shit... I don't get it. But here's something I just read in my "Corrections in the 21st Century" book:

    Approximately 42 million felonies are committed annually in the U.S.
    Only 12 million of these are reported to the police.
    Of these 12 million reports, only about 6 million end up in arrests.
    After arresting 6 million felons, only 912,000 are convicted.
    And finally... only 419,500 are sent to prison.

    What. The. Fuck.

    (Am I the only one who finds this crazy?)

    I knew that crimes sometimes went unreported, but seriously?!
     
  2. hypoc8

    hypoc8 Member

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    I think alot of crimes don't get reported because people don't want to get involved or they're afraid of retalliation. Sad world.
     
  3. marta

    marta New Member

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    Never trust crime statistics!

    How do they know 42 million felonies are comitted if they have not been reported?
     
  4. IntoxicatingToxin

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    That's why I said "approximately". And they know this because of the NCVS - the National Crime Victims Survey... which is an anonymous survey taken yearly asking about what offenses people have had committed against them. When it's completely anonymous, more people are willing to admit to things like rape, etc.
     
  5. B_Think_Kink

    B_Think_Kink New Member

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    Afraid to become involved, ashamed if it happened to them, or maybe they just don't care as long as it doesn't happen to them.
     
  6. tripod

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    That is flippin' INSANE!! I literally had no idea... those sure are alarming figures, VERY SCARY!!! I highly agree with you, it's CR-AAAAA-ZY!!!!!
     
  7. EagleCowboy

    EagleCowboy Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty much accurate.
    Plus, many have done something illegal themselves so the last thing they want around them in authorities of any kind.
     
  8. IntoxicatingToxin

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    My teacher made a good point when we went over that section of the book... he said, "It's probably a good thing, in a way, that all crimes don't get reported... can you imagine what would happen to our Criminal Justice system if we had that much going on? It would completely collapse." It's a sad, unfortunate, but good point.
     
  9. tripod

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    Not reporting felonious crime theoretically results in a catch-22. Under-reporting crime negates the deterrent power of the Justice system by removing the negative reinforcement of punishment. More crime is in turn committed because of the little retribution felt by the criminal population. The justice system isn't even capable of processing all of these crimes, another year rolls by and the cycle renews itself again, resulting in more crime.

    They might be also counting drug statistics and yes, including all of the drug felonies that could be reported would be staggering if every drug user turned in their dealers, friends and family who use, and lastly themselves. This might be the smoking gun to these figures...
     
  10. HazelGod

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    Yeah, they might have to (gasp) focus their resources on actually harmful crimes instead of dedicating entire squadrons of police forces to stupid shit like speedy drivers and pot smokers. :rolleyes:
     
  11. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Well, drugs may definitely be a contributing factor... and I MAY be wrong here... but I don't think drugs are always considered a felony, are they? Maybe if you are charged with intent to sell or something, I don't know. But I can't imagine that being caught with a dime bag of weed would catch you a felony charge...
     
  12. midlifebear

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    Dear TattooedMamaMeg:

    I feel your pain, truly I do. But not all felonies are the same. If you're concentrating on violent felonies such as murder, rape, anything that involves guns, knives, drunken drivers, or other acts that cause physical pain, mental torture, or death . . . you betchaboyhowdy, I'm alarmed, too. But if my neighbor has a 30 marijuana plants growing in his back yard or basement for his own use (a felony in my state, intent to distribute or not) and I'm aware of it, no way would I consider calling the police and having him or her thrown in prison. Same goes for the 15-16 year-old high school student who makes the dumb mistake of selling a hit of LSD or extasy to someone which, currently in the USA, automatically forces the courts to put the kid away for 10 to 20 years. However, I have no sympathy for the 20-something crack head cooking meth in his single-wide out in the high desert. He should know better despite the fact he or she may be one of the bottom feeders who fell through the cracks and never learned to read, write, or be a responsible citizen. Still, he should receive more counseling, rehabilitation, and job training than just throwing him a cell with a new butt buddy for X number of years.

    I lived next to polygamists (polygamy is a federal felony) for years and upon occasion they pissed me off enough that I wanted to file a complaint with the local sheriff and cause them a load of trouble, but I stopped myself because I was personally aware that no under-age girls or other children had been married off illegally or sexually abused. However, if that had been the case I would have personally tied up the men in charge at gun point and trucked them off to the pokey on my own.

    Pederasts/pedophiles? Yup, they should be reported. Their victims should receive high-end psychological counselin, and the child molesters should be (IMHO) chemically castrated and do time. But more importantly, so should the asshole that embezzeled, raided, and ran off with the retirement funds of ENRON employees. Castrate them all!

    In my part of Nevada prostitution is legal. Even the mormons agree that the local brothels have a positive influence on keeping rapes and sexual crimes down to almost zero. Plus, the brothels are great public citizens by regularly paying their city and state taxes. However, in Clark, Lincoln, and Washoe counties (Las Vegas and Reno) prostitution is illegal and the hooker who is convicted of the three-strike for soliciting (a misdemeanor) becomes a go-to-jail felon. In these cases it makes more sense to me to change the laws so what is considered to be illegal be made legal and regulated by those popular counties and monitored by the State Health Department as the honorable profession is in most of the State.

    If you're talking about gang violence and the fear of retribution if you inform of their illegal activities to the police -- at the moment that is a lost cause and definitely something to worry about; especially when the local police, themselves, are afraid of the gangs. What about our local sheriff who was caught and convicted of accepting bribes? He was convicted of a felony, but somehow four years later he ran for sheriff again and won? Hmmmm . . . .

    I'm afraid the statistics (or whatever those numbers are) that you posted are too broad. Just what kind of felonies are we talking about here? In the state in which I was born it was a felony to have sex with someone with the same naughty bits. Although sodomy laws have supposedly been finally shot down by the Supreme Court, that hasn't stopped many local law enforcment officials from finding other ways to charge gays -- and even unmarried straight couples -- with felony sex charges. "Cohabitation" is still on the books in Ewetaw as a felonious living arrangement. They haven't sent anyone to jail for that felony for quite some time, but it's still the law in that state. You may think I'm pulling this out of my ass as I type it, but I'm not. Why the Hell do you think I spend 99% of my life living outside of the United States of A? Sure, the cultures are more interesting (at least to me), but growing opium poppies in my front yard because I like the flowers, not because I'm planning on becoming an opium baron, is not a crime in the countries where I live. Now, if I were to plant several acres of the damn things, there might be a problem. Yet, in the entire USA, the discovery of one single blooming papaveracae somniferum plant, a plant that was a common garden flower in my mormon grandmother's front yard in the 1950's, is now grounds for the Federal Government to permanently seize all of your personal property (i.e. your home and cars) and toss you in prison for 20 years because of over-zealous anti drug laws. And they do it, too.

    Just wanting to know what felonies we're talking about.

    I love you madly. You know I really do! I've never been afraid of catching girl cooties.
     
  13. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Felonies period. Anything that qualifies as a felony. And I'm not necessarily saying that EVERY SINGLE FELONY should be reported every time. But that's a 30 million difference between approximately how many are happening and how many are reported. Less than half of felonies are reported. That's insane. How many women out there aren't reporting rape because they are embarrassed, or afraid of repercussions, or because it's their own husband that's raping them? This is the shit that needs to be reported.

    Also, in defense of crack heads, not all of them are as you described, and I'm actually incredibly offended that you would categorize crack heads as being those kinds of people. ("bottom feeders who fell through the cracks and never learned to read, write, or be a responsible citizen.") What a way to generalize. :rolleyes:

    So what you are saying is... that because a hooker can't get her fucking county lines straight, the county should change the laws to accomodate her? If she gets caught once (and it's a misdemeanor, as you said) then she is NOT a felon. She hasn't committed a felony. But if she gets caught once, then she should know better than to do it again. So she does it a SECOND time, and they STILL give her another chance. If she's stupid enough to do it a third time, that's her own fucking problem. Not the problem of the county.
     
  14. HazelGod

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    No, the simple possession of some controlled substances in some states is classified as a misdemeanor. The amount varies by state and by substance and by circumstance.

    As with most quantitative laws, though, the qualifications are arbitrary at best...and nowhere near consistent across jurisdictions.

    In either case, they're utterly stupid. The CJ system should exist to protect the public order...i.e. policing and prosecuting violent crimes against people and those that disrupt the rules of public order (fraud, theft, burglary, etc.) Too many of the heavily policed infractions are focused upon for their revenue generation potential.

    Take seat belt laws: It's a fucking case study in nanny government. Not only are the police actively patrolling for people not wearing them, but the state (at least mine) has actually spent millions of taxpayer dollars on a stupid-ass advertising campaign to tell people that they're doing so. For what?!? If you're a grown adult too stupid to grok that buckling up increases your survival odds, then why is it the state's job to make sure that you do? And why should the taxpayers foot the bill for such?
     
  15. IntoxicatingToxin

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    In Kansas and Missouri... they can't actually pull you over for not wearing a seat belt... but if they pull you over for something else, and you aren't wearing a seat belt, then they can fine you for that as well. They did advertising for it at one point on television, which was a bit much, but I haven't seen a commercial for it in forever.
     
  16. Love-it

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    You can blame a lot of the statistics on convictions of felons on lawyers and lawyers who become judges, and plea bargaining. Many felony's get ignored due to lack of evidence strong enough for individual verdicts during the trial of a felon with multiple felonies, he may only be sentenced for one crime. One felony conviction may cover more more than one felony.
     
  17. tripod

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    Now we're getting somewhere... excellent insight. That would account for how they could get the figure of the total felonies committed in one year. You get a gold star!!!
     
  18. OldPArtner

    OldPArtner New Member

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    After all, a felony is only committed once you're arrested!:rolleyes:
     
  19. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Um... If I stole a car, I committed a felony regardless of whether or not I ever got arrested.
     
  20. Osiris

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    I think afraid to become involved is a big one. How many times do you see someone that was victimized in a busy street or mall and they say "There were people everywhere, I was screaming for help, but no one stopped."

    There is a situation here in Seattle where a school teacher saw a woman being beaten up by a man at a bus shelter. He called police from his cell and then went to try and stop the guy. The guy not only knocked him out cold, but the teacher hit the ground so hard, he cracked his skull and was in intensive care in critical condition until yesterday when he was upgraded a little. The pisser here is that friends have put up a website, been on every newscast and still, none will come forward.

    This crime happened on a street full of apartment buildings on a Sunday evening. The saddest part is that the woman he was trying to help hasn't come forward. True, she could be scared of the man that was attacking her, but you still just kind of hope the person sees reason and tris to at least report it anonymously.
     
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