The Etymology of 'FUCK YOU'

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by earllogjam, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. earllogjam

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    How did this favorite curse phrase come into being? How long has it been used?

    Isn't it ironic how the worst curse phrase in our language could also be the same word we use to describe the act of concieving life? I wonder if it reveals anything about our American culture.
     
  2. camper joe

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    Word History: The obscenity fuck is a very old word and has been considered shocking from the first, though it is seen in print much more often now than in the past. Its first known occurrence, in code because of its unacceptability, is in a poem composed in a mixture of Latin and English sometime before 1500. The poem, which satirizes the Carmelite friars of Cambridge, England, takes its title, "Flen flyys," from the first words of its opening line, "Flen, flyys, and freris," that is, "fleas, flies, and friars." The line that contains fuck reads "Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk." The Latin words "Non sunt in coeli, quia," mean "they [the friars] are not in heaven, since." The code "gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk" is easily broken by simply substituting the preceding letter in the alphabet, keeping in mind differences in the alphabet and in spelling between then and now: i was then used for both i and j; v was used for both u and v; and vv was used for w. This yields "fvccant [a fake Latin form] vvivys of heli." The whole thus reads in translation: "They are not in heaven because they fuck wives of Ely [a town near Cambridge]."
    The American
     
  3. Principessa

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    I always thought it was a slang term for sexual intercourse, or exclamation of annoyance.

    However according to wikipedia:

    Fuck is an Englishword that, as a verb, means to engage in sexual intercourse. The word is generally considered very offensive.
    It is unclear whether the word has always been considered vulgar, and if not, when it first started to be considered vulgar. Some evidence indicates that in some English-speaking locales it was considered acceptable as late as the 17th century meaning "to strike" or "to penetrate."[1] Other evidence indicates that it may have become vulgar as early as the 16th century in England, although neither set of evidence is inherently contradictory to the other, since many words have multiple connotations. The word became increasingly offensive over time because of its usage to describe (often in an extremely angry, hostile or belligerent manner) negative or unpleasant circumstances or people in an intentionally offensive way, such as in the term "motherfucker", one of its more common usages.

    Fuck is used not only as a verb (transitive and intransitive), but also as a noun, interjection, and, occasionally, as an expletive infix. The etymology of the word is uncertain.

    As defined by etymonline.com

    As defined by answers.com
     
  4. gjorg

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    Apparently the widespread useage started in the very late 1800's according to the authors of HBO's driftwood. They might have been defending their use of cocksucker I really don't remember!
     
  5. SpoiledPrincess

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    It didn't appear in the OED until 1972.
     
  6. BruiserMN

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    An entertaining documentary entitled FUCK (The Internet Movie Database (IMDb)) was done a couple years ago looking for the origin of the word. While they had a wide range of individuals participating in the project (Sam Donaldson, Pat Boone, Ice-T, Ron Jeremy, and Janeane Garofalo just to name a few), they weren't able to uncover the origin of the word. It's a fun documentary, though.

    The first known usage of the word "fuck" was in about 1465. It was published in a poem entitled "Flen Flyys" about that time.
     
  7. 36DD

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    It's origin was in early christian times when people were condemned to be executed for their crime of adultery. The inscription F.U.C.K. was hung above them to announce the crime of which they were guilty.
    F.U.C.K. stands for Fornicators Under Christ's Kingdom.
     
  8. fortiesfun

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    Though the etymology of the word is unclear, the phrase has never seemed particularly mysterious except in our refusal to face what it really means. We tend to hear it with modern ears that make it sound like, "hope you get laid." But what it plainly means is much closer to "I hope you get raped." It is not wishing one the pleasant experience of getting his rocks off, but the painful one of being anally assaulted. In urban situations it is not uncommon to hear it embelished to make this point crystal clear, as in "fuck you in the ass with a two-by-four." It is a very old, and very angry, insult and conception is NOT the point.
     
  9. rexcasual

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    Interesting sources.

    Coincidently, in audible terms, fuck is a good phonetic expression of a queef.

    :rolleyes: *Considers queef spelt backwards*
    Out stroke. In stroke.
     
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