The Fall of Judith (sorry, not a sexual story...just yet).

Discussion in 'Fictitious Stories' started by GoneA, Nov 9, 2005.

  1. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    PART I – The Offer: I almost want to say you don't have a choice.

    Effortless is the task to impress upon the mind of an innocent, impressionable individual the need for a ‘greater’ security. In a world where evil has become a citizen in the hearts and minds of certain individuals; and consequently, danger hangs like chandeliers on every dark street corner, it is not strange to seek refuge in people we think can provide it. Suffice it to say, that nature herself has divided man into three very distinct classifications: the good, the bad, and the lost. The good hope to fist the world with the hand of righteousness; the bad are inclined to nihilistically dominate the populace, and the lost are left to choose which path they will take. It all would be a seamless flow, if were not punctuated by lies, drugs, money and voracious sexual appetites.

    “Life’s a bitch and then you die”, Judith whispered as she walked away from the graveyard, still wiping away the few tears that managed to slide down her cheeks. Thin, red lines had etched in the whites of her eyes. “Then you get killed”, she corrected herself, this time a little louder than a whisper.

    The skies were gray and dismal. The night was silent, the air was cold, and the wind stood as still as dead fish. The inextricability of the trees threw an eerie circular shadow around the gravesite.

    She closed the door to her small, black Honda and took in a deep breath. A small, framed picture of her sister, Gwyneth, rested on the dashboard. Gwyneth’s long, dark blonde hair framed her pale face, perfectly and her high cheek bones and nicely arched eyebrows were a compliment to her pale blue eyes. She was very, very pretty, Judith thought as she caressed the picture with her thumb. But Gwyneth was dead now and nothing would bring her back, she forcibly placed the picture facedown on the empty passenger’s seat.

    She drove off...while another car followed.

    The ride back home was, as usual, long and intense. Once she pulled off the highway and onto the street, she noticed the sidewalks were peppered with patriotic colored posters, in support of Robert Heckerman for mayor. His slogans were: “One Vote Can Change the Whole City” and “You Can Make a Difference”. “I couldn’t make much of a difference when that bastard killed my sister!” sarcasm and despair salted her words as they floated in the air like balloons. “Give me a damn break. This city will never get any better; not with you in office Heckerman, not with Jesus Christ in office. What if someone killed your sister or mother or whoever – would my vote make a difference then? Give-me-a-damn-break!”

    She didn’t care to make sense of anything she said. Yet, to a certain extent, she was right. The crime rate was on the rise, especially in New York City, her city. The death of her sister had brought this reality closer to home. From time to time, Judith felt both helpless and utterly espoused to the evil of the world. She died a little inside. It seemed that every nefarious fiend and mysterious creature, which haunted her only in nightmares, had crept their way into her real life; and now, they troubled her both sleeping and waking. She had become a powdery shell that dissolved with the trickle of every tear.

    Judith found a parking space at the end of block and her apartment building was situated in the middle. When she emerged from the Honda, the cold air hit her like a block, her breath danced and swirled in midair and evaporated. This only reinforced her suitable hatred for winter. She walked to her building, climbed the stairs, and was in the building’s hallway before she knew it. Her apartment was at the far end of the hall, out of habit; she opened her door, stepped inside and stood (with the door closed) against the door in the dark of her apartment. Judith drew in a deep breath, as if when she had crossed the threshold of her apartment she entered into a parallel universe – a safer universe.

    She flicked on the light and screamed, loudly, with terror and bewilderment. The blood rushed to her extremities as her right hand reached for the door knob. She had never wanted to stay one place but leave so badly.

    “Hello, Judith.” The male voice was firm and confident. He sat back, legs crossed, in her bronze-colored loveseat. His all black attire was just as mysterious as his sudden appearance. “How are you?” he continued.

    “Who are you and how the hell do you know me?” she attempted bravado but the crack in her voice testified of her fear.

    “Well, I’m Roth, for now away; and, let’s just say I’m your…protector.”

    “You better start producing some real answers. I’m all out of Prozac and I’m up to kicking somebody’s ass.” In no way was this cheap talk, after the murder of Gwyneth, she had taken up karate classes and had become quite adept in that discipline.

    He, Roth, pushed back his black suit jacket to reveal a brown and black .22 Rimfire, resting on his lap. “You’re scared, I know you are”, he continued “but not of me. I believe you can kick my ass. The only problem is kicking the ass of every single criminal you encounter. You’re scared because you don’t want what happened to you sister to happen to you – or to your family. Getting rapped and killed, I say, is one of the worst fates to befall a woman. Yet, I can help. I can ensure that it won’t happen again – to you and yours. I can give your family – your mother, your other sister, her little girl, even your friends – guaranteed protection. I just need you to…cooperate.”

    “What do you mean by ‘cooperate’” “And if I don’t?” “You gonna shoot me with that gun?” Another attempt at bravado – another crack in the voice.

    “Then I can’t promise the safety of your family. You know criminals, such as the kind your family encountered, always like to…complete, the job. I almost want to say you don’t have a choice. I’ve been having you followed Judith, that’s how I know so much about you. That’s why I’ve chosen you. My offer’s on the table – what do you think?

    Roth was tall and well built. His dark, black hair was freshly gelled back; his jaw was muscular and well-defined and his skin was dark and rich as olive oil. She admitted, reluctantly, his sensuality. Judith stared at him, trying to study him, trying to demystify his persona; with one eyebrow raised she said hoarsely, “I’m listening”.

    “I’m glad we see eye to eye.” Roth said, “Very glad indeed.”
     
  2. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Chpt. 2 is coming soon....open to comments, btw. lol.
     
  3. Matthew

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,374
    Likes Received:
    162
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    Come on with it GA ...
     
  4. Alley Blue

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    6
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    New York
    I was gonna post a comment when you first posted this story, but I keep getting lost here at our wonderfully revamped LSPG forum.....I'll find my way around eventually.....

    GoneA, great story! Can't wait to read Chapt.2.........bring it on brutha man:p
     
  5. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Okay guys, this is the second installation. It is DIVIDED into two boxes because of it's length. Hope you like it. It's not as long as it looks and it really is a quick read. Sorry to those looking for a sexual story, that part is....developing and NEAR.

    Again, open to comments and discussions...
     
  6. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Chapter 2 – Stories and Lies: Your smart, come up with something creative and, more importantly, believable.

    Character. It is our true selves, the very building blocks that comprise who we are. Character, in itself, is a kaleidoscopic body – pliable even – as it grows and dwindles, stretches and shrinks, straightens and twists with every consequential event in our lives. It is this conformable nature that renders us as adaptable and resilient creatures; so that, when the human spirit is tested, it is not quickly torn-down and when it is bent, it not easily broken. However, there are times when we reach our lowest point and under the pressure of intricate choices and ruthless fatigue, we fall to pieces, like an undone puzzle.

    ----------

    The alarm clock sounded, rescuing Judith from a torrent of dark figures and evil creatures exacting all sorts of horrid deeds upon her in her sleep. Strands of her medium brown hair pasted to the sides of her sweaty face, when she awoke. She was cold.

    ----------

    Roth left with her, the night of their encounter, a very precise set of written directives as to what was to transpire once he left her. He allotted her three and a half weeks time to complete everything; when the three and a half weeks expired, they would meet again. This, Roth indicated, was ample amount of time to complete everything he expected of her. He spoke very little, only very slight warnings here and there, about phoning the police – she knew better than to try it.

    Firstly, Roth said it was necessary for her to quit her job. Judith worked in the Information Technology Department for the Associated Press. It was a career she more or less fell into – especially since she studied History and International Relations at the University of Pennsylvania. Quitting her job, she thought, was not the hard part; six years she’d been working there and thoughts of leaving were not foreign to her. She prolonged her stay simply because she made the higher-end of five figure salary.

    Quitting would be easy; due to the behemoth-sized organization (the AP); she was not considered a key employee. People in her field came and went all the time and her situation would be the same, for the exception of a few office friends, her leaving would be unnoticed. Two days later, she gave her boss her two weeks notice and informed a few people in the office of her near-term departure from the AP. Jane, her co-worker and someone Judith considered a good friend, was the most troubled by the news.

    “I almost want to quit, too. I mean, what am I going to do without you here? It’s going to be so…”

    “It’s going to be fine” Judith interrupted. The juxtaposition of their cubicles allowed them to whisper back and forth without anyone hearing. “It’s just something I have to do, you know. I’m not terribly happy here and, frankly, this really isn’t the kind of career I had in mind. Fixing computers all day – it’s boring.”

    “Why so soon; doesn’t this seem very sporadic to you?” Jane’s eyebrows scrunched together as she tired to make sense of it all.

    “No! Not in the least bit; people do random things all the time. I guess I’m just a random person. And this really isn’t as random as it is necessary.”

    “Moving to a different state – Pennsylvania – is not something you can chalk up to being a random person. It’s really a life-changing decision. It’s something…”

    “And I need a change in life” Judith said impetuously, interrupting again. “And the job I’ll be accepting will pay me more than what I make here.”

    “But, where will you live? And your family – your friends, what did they say about it? Have you told them?

    “I used to go to school in Pennsylvania; I’ll be staying with my friend Darlene. I shouldn’t be with her any longer than a month. I have savings, so buying an apartment won’t be hard, besides, I have one here, which is more expensive than what I’ll pay in Pennsylvania.”

    “And you family?” Jane dived back into the heart of her questioning.

    “Well, I mean, they don’t like the fact that I’m leaving but, overall they are happy for me. My father loves the idea of me traveling and getting to explore the world.”

    They went back and forth but Jane’s argument was to avail. She went on about commitments and responsibilities here; Judith explained that she was single, in perfect health, and had none. Although the two had become good friends – occasionally going out to bars and hitting on guys, and when Jane had suffered through an abusive relationship Judith was there to help – she [Judith] still had no desire to tell her the truth. Judith told her she was accepting a job offer in Pennsylvania – a job that paid her more money and allowed for more flexibility. That would just have to do.

    Secondly, the hard part, Roth instructed her to tell her parents and loved ones. In the letter it read: I am not greatly concerned with what you tell them; yet, for your sake, it should sound convincing. If they become too suspicious of your leaving, they’ll call the police – and that’s not a risk I’m very keen on taking. Your smart, come up with something creative and, more importantly, believable. “Bastard”, Jane mouthed when she read the passage, his arrogance ate at her. She resented greatly the task before her, but, she knew to a large degree it was necessary – it started to feel like an innate responsibility. With contempt, Judith folded the letter, placed it in her bag and made her way to the subway.

    “It’s Sunday honey, relax and stay for dinner. You’re always in a hurry and like a cat on a hot tin roof.” Donald, Judith’s father, said.

    “Yeah, you’re like a long tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.” Gretchen, her mother, chimed in.

    “What’s with the cat similes? Do you guys have a cat? You know I hate cats!”

    Her parents ignored her witticisms. “What was so important that you had to tell us?” Her father continued. Donald was just less than six feet and had a slight hunchback. His stomach bore witness to his years of over-consumption of beer – especially when his marriage fell into jeopardy as a consequence of his daughter’s murder. Like most other men, Donald was gradually becoming bald, and the hair that remained was changing from blonde to gray; and, like most other men, as his weight increased, his health declined. He was fifty-seven and showed no signs of aging charmingly.

    “Well mom and dad, to get right down to it, I’m moving – back to Pennsylvania.” Judith clasped her hands together and tightened the corners of her mouth.

    Gretchen and Donald sat flanking one another on their leather black and white sofa. There was a thin silence in the room as their brains scrambled to digest what Judith had said. That peculiar awkwardness filled the room, where everyone is hesitant to speak, for fear that they will speak when someone else is ready to, thus, creating further discomfiture.

    Gretchen broke the very thick ice with, “How long have you been planning this? Have you been planning this? W – wh – why? Why?” Gretchen was very soft spoken. Her wavy, reddish hair stopped directly at her shoulders. Her face was long and drawn, and her eyes were sunk back into their sockets, just a little more than usual – often engendering swift second glances from people. Thin, jagged lines had etched, in random patterns, throughout her face. Lately, her eyes were always watery and red – much of it was due to her aging and at other times due to Gwyneth’s death. Gretchen was always thin but, lately she was gaining weight and becoming shapeless. Like her husband, at fifty-five, she was in no wise aging gracefully.

    “Well, I’m not randomly deciding to move; I got a promotion. Well, I haven’t been promoted as much as I’ve been recruited. The ‘international team’ for the Associated Press, saw my work and was impressed, and requested that I join them. So I accepted. With this new position, I’ll get sent around, from state to state, implementing new software my company develops and fixing certain inherent problems with the system. It’s all very technical but, basically, their headquarters are in Pennsylvania – right outside of Philly. So, I’ll have to report, regularly, to headquarters to show the work I’ve done and get new assignments.” Judith inhaled deeply, it had all come out the way she practiced it.

    There was more silence and less awkwardness. “Well, I guess it’s my turn.” Her father said. “Judith, I couldn’t be happier for you. If this is something that you want to do – then do it. Personally, I think it would be better for you especially with the death of your sister. This move may help you to cope, in its own way. I think we all need to get away, really. I just want you to be safe – happy – but safe.” Donald grabbed Judith’s clasped hands and smiled reassuringly.
     
  7. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    Her father mentioning Gwyneth –especially in that way – made Judith feel uncomfortable about lying. Suddenly, she had the urge to tell him the truth, but, she knew she could not. For the first time, she was actually scarred – for her wellbeing and for her life. Judith had never withheld anything from her dad and loved the very open relationship they shared – he had been her hero for as long as she could remember. Yet, now when she needed him the most, she couldn’t seek refuge in him.

    “And me too, sweetheart” Gretchen placed her hands over theirs. “You’re a big girl now; I guess I have to accept that. You were happy when you were at UPenn, I don’t see why you wouldn’t be happy again.”

    “But, who are you going to be staying with?” Donald questioned, surprised it hadn’t been the first thing he thought to ask.

    “With Darlene, you guys know Darlene. I should be with her for about a month and then I should be on my own.” Judith said, telling them the same thing she told Jane.

    Judith stayed for dinner like her father asked. During dinner, they discussed more about what her new job entailed and what moving to Pennsylvania would be like. That evening, Janie, her step-sister, came over and Judith told her the news. After much debating back and forth Janie realized there was no stopping her and wished her the best of luck.

    “My window of opportunity is open” Judith said to her family. “If I don’t seize the moment now, who knows what I’ll be missing out on.” Judith hoped these words would quench any lingering doubts her family harbored.

    “Did anyone else, besides you, get promoted?” Janie asked

    Judith paused for a moment, “Yeah, my coworker and really good friend … Roth.”

    ----------

    Jane shut off her alarm clock and got out of bed. Time seemed to be leaping towards the date of her and Roth’s next encounter. Judith had phoned all her friends and told them about her moving. The conversations were a mix between what she had with Jane and her parents.

    She went into the bathroom and stared at herself in the mirror, “I don’t know what you’re doing”, she started “but I hope its right.”
     
  8. Matthew

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,374
    Likes Received:
    162
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    So???? Now what happens?
     
  9. GoneA

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    5,176
    Likes Received:
    1
    oh yes, the story ... I'll get right on that.

    let's just say, life has gotten a bit in the way.
     
  10. Matthew

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,374
    Likes Received:
    162
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    Take your time. I'll be here all day!
     
Draft saved Draft deleted