the greatest speech of all time?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by royston, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. royston

    royston New Member

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    wondering what you guys think is the best speech ever...here are some i like

    i have a dream- martin luther king
    inches speech- al pacino, any given sunday
    blood, sweat and tears- winston churchill
    to be or not to be- william shakespeare

    xx
     
  2. Shelby

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    Gettysburg Address
     
  3. D_Claude Hopper

    D_Claude Hopper New Member

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    I have to go with:

    Winston Churchhills Iron Curtain Speach and,
    while not really a speach though it could have been,
    Baz Luhrman's sunscreen graduation speach
     
  4. GoneA

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    Promised Land Speech - Martin Luther King
    On the Pulse of Morning - Maya Angelou


    that long speech in the Matrix 3 by that guy.
     
  5. madame_zora

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    "Terrible Lies" by NIN
     
  6. ceg1526

    ceg1526 Member

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    FDR's First Inaugural: The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Fear Itself
     
  7. Webster

    Webster New Member

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    Spencer Tracy to Katherine Hepburn in "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner".
    "If what they feel for each other, is half......

    Katherine Hepburn to Henry Fonda in "On Golden Pond". "Listen to me, mister. You're my knight in shining armor. Don't you forget it............ You're going to get back on that horse. And, I'll be right behind you, holding on tight. And, away we'll go go go."

    I have pretty much everything published by Maya Angelou. I can hear her beautiful voice in every word.

    Great stuff.........

    :wink:
     
  8. fratpack

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    absolutely anything Maya Angelou speaks is worth listening.
    Mario Cuomo during the Democratic Convention.
    Barbara Jordon during the Nixon impeachment hearings - what magnificence.
     
  9. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Truman Capote at the Annual Meeting of The Pagans and Hells Angels.
     
  10. Freddie53

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    I agree. This address will stand out throughout the lfietime of this civilization.

    "I Have a Dream," by Martin Luther King Jr. comes in a close second.
     
  11. Onslow

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    I would tend to go with J.F.K.'s inaugural speech fromn 1961. Sure I was a little too young to fully comprehend it's entire meaning at the time but it made me stop and think for a while and I still think back on it whenever I start to making demands for me and me alone.


    "And so my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you---ask what you can do for your country.
    Citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you but what together we can do for the freedom of man."

    (and of course almost anything said by either George the First or George the currrent)


    Then of course the rambling but meaningful speeches of Teddy Roosevelt--they may seem weird at the outset; but a good read of them shows that they are the deeper inner thoughts of a man who understood the workings of the human mind and ways. (the Muck-rake speech possibly being the main exception)
     
  12. windtalkerways

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    Mahatma Gandhi Speech~

    Gandhi became leader of the Indian National Congress in 1920 and the Congress adopted his programme of Satyagraha, non-violent non-cooperation, which he had earlier practiced in South Africa. "I discovered that pursuit of truth did not admit of violence being inflicted on one's opponent," Gandhi wrote, "but that he must be weaned from error by patience and sympathy. For what appears to be truth to one may appear to be error to the other. And patience means self-suffering. So the doctrine came to mean vindication of truth, not by the infliction of suffering on the opponent but on one's self."

    Supporting the Satyagraha campaign, Gandhi traveled throughout India, often speaking to meetings of more than 100,000 Indians. He was constantly shadowed by the police but it was not until 1922 that he was arrested and charged with sedition for three articles in his magazine Young India. The great trial at Abmadabad, at which Gandhi pleaded guilty, followed.


    Non-violence is the first article of my faith. It is the last article of my faith. But I had to make my choice. I had either to submit to a system which I considered has done an irreparable harm to my country or incur the risk of the mad fury of my people bursting forth when they understood the truth from my lips. I know that my people have sometimes gone mad. I am deeply sorry for it; and I am therefore, here, to submit not to a light penalty but to the highest penalty. I do not ask for mercy. I do not plead any extenuating act. I am here, therefore, to invite and submit to the highest penalty that can be inflicted upon me for what in law is a deliberate crime and what appears to me to be the highest duty of a citizen. The only course open to you, Mr Judge, is, as I am just going to say in my statement, either to resign your post or inflict on me the severest penalty if you believe that the system and law you are assisting to administer are good for the people. I do not expect that kind of conversion. But by the time I have finished with my statement you will, perhaps, have a glimpse of what is raging within my breast to run this maddest risk which a sane man can run.
    Gandhi then read his statement to the court.
    Little do town-dwellers know how the semi-starved masses of Indians are slowly sinking to lifelessness. Little do they know that their miserable comfort represents the brokerage they get for the work they do for the foreign exploiter, that the profits and the brokerage are sucked from the masses. Little do they realize that the government established by law in British India is carried on for this exploitation of the masses. No sophistry, no jugglery in figures can explain away the evidence the skeletons in many villages present to the naked eye. I have no doubt whatsoever that both England and the town-dwellers of India will have to answer, if there is a God above, for this crime against humanity which is perhaps unequalled in history. The law itself in this country has been used to serve the foreign exploiter. My experience of political cases in India leads me to the conclusion that in nine out of every ten the condemned men were totally innocent. Their crime consisted in love of their country. In ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, justice has been denied to Indians as against Europeans in the courts of India. This is not an exaggerated picture. It is the experience of almost every Indian who has had anything to do with such cases. In my opinion the administration of the law is thus prostituted consciously or unconsciously for the benefit of the exploiter.
    The greatest misfortune is that Englishmen and their Indian associates in the administration of the country do not know that they are engaged in the crime I have attempted to describe. I am satisfied that many English and Indian officials honestly believe that they are administering one of the best systems devised in the world and that India is making steady though slow progress. They do not know that a subtle but effective system of terrorism and an organized display of force on the one hand and the deprivation of all powers of retaliation or self-defence on the other have emasculated the people and induced in them the habit of simulation. This awful habit has added to the ignorance and the self-deception of the administrators. Section 124-A under which I am happily charged is perhaps the prince among the political sections of the Indian Penal Code designed to suppress the liberty of the citizen. Affection cannot be manufactured or regulated by law. If one has no affection for a person or thing one should be free to give the fullest expression of his disaffection so long as he does not contemplate, promote or incite to violence. But the section under which Mr Banker and I are charged is one under which mere promotion of disaffection is a crime. I have studied some of the cases tried under it, and I know that some of the most loved of India's patriots have been convicted under it. I consider it a privilege, therefore, to be charged under it. I have endeavored to give in their briefest outline the reasons for my disaffection. I have no personal ill-will against any single administrator, much less can I have any disaffection towards the King's person. But I hold it to be a virtue to be disaffected towards a government which in its totality has done more harm to India than any previous system. India is less manly under the British rule that she ever was before. Holding such a belief, I consider it to be a sin to have affection for the system. And it has been a precious privilege for me to be able to write what I have in the various articles tendered in evidence against me.
    In fact I believe that I have rendered a service to India and England by showing in non-cooperation the way out of the unnatural state in which both are living. In my humble opinion, non-cooperation with evil is as much a duty as is cooperation with good. But in the past, non-cooperation only multiplies evil and that as evil can only be sustained by violence, withdrawal of support of evil requires complete abstention from violence. Non-violence implies voluntary submission to the penalty for non-cooperation with evil. I am here, therefore, to invite and submit cheerfully to the highest duty of a citizen. The only course open to you, the Judge and the Assessors, is either to resign your posts and thus dissociate yourselves from the evil if you feel that the law you are called upon to administer is an evil and that in reality I am innocent, or to inflict on me the severest penalty if you believe that the system and the law you are assisting to administer are good for the people of this country and that my activity is therefore injurious to the public weal.

    After his statement before the court, Gandhi was sentenced to six years' imprisonment and thanked the judge for his courtesy. He was imprisoned again in 1930, 1933 and 1942 when he went on hunger strike as part of his campaign of civil disobedience. He eventually collaborated with the English to gain independence for India, which was proclaimed twenty-five years later. A saint to many Hindus, he was assassinated in 1948.
     
  13. windtalkerways

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    Nelson Mandela Speech

    Nelson Mandela was released twenty-seven years after he was imprisoned, in February 1990. Four years later, after President William de Klerk initiated a historic peace accord with the black majority of South Africans, led by Mandela, he was elected President of South Africa's first democratic elections. This was his inaugural address.

    Today all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world, confer glory and hope to newborn liberty.
    Out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. Our daily deeds as ordinary South Africans must produce an actual South African reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all.
    All this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today.
    To my compatriots, I have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimiately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of Pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld.
    Each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renewal. The national mood changes as the seasons change. We are moved by a sense of joy and exhilaration when the grass turns green and the flowers bloom.
    That spiritual and physical oneness we all share with this common homeland explains the depth of the pain we all carried in our hearts as we saw our country tear itself apart in a terrible conflict, and as we saw it spurned, outlawed and isolated by the people of the world, precisely because is has become the universal base of the pernicious ideology and practice of racism and racial oppression.
    We, the people of South Africa, feel fulfilled that humanity has taken us back into its bosom; that we, who were outlaws not so long ago, have today been given the rare privilege to be host to the nations of the world on our own soil. We thank our entire distinguished international guests for having come to take possession with the people of our country of what is, after all, a common victory for justice, for peace, for human dignity.
    We trust that you will continue to stand by us as we tackle the challenges of building peace, prosperity, non-sexism, non-racialism and democracy. We deeply appreciate the role that the masses of our people and their political mass democratic, religious, women, youth, business, traditional and other leaders have played to bring about this conclusion. Not least among them is my second deputy president, the honourable F W de Klerk. We would also like to pay tribute to our security forces, in all their ranks, for the distinguished role they have played in securing our first democratic elections and the transition to democracy, from bloodthirsty forces which refused to see the light.
    The time for the healing of the wounds has come. The moment to bridge the chasms that divide us has come. The time to build is upon us. We have, at last, achieved our political emancipation. We pledge our-selves to liberate all our people from the continuing bondage of poverty, deprivation, suffering gender and other discrimination.
    We succeeded to take our last steps to freedom in conditions of relative peace. We commit ourselves to the construction of a complete, just and lasting peace.
    We have triumphed in the effort to implant hope in the breasts of the millions of our people. We enter into a covenant that we shall build the society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity - a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.
    As a token of its commitment to the renewal of our country, the new interim Government of National Unity will, as a matter of urgency, address the issue of amnesty for various categories of our people who are currently serving terms of imprisonment.
    We dedicate this day to all the heroes and heroines of this country and the rest of the world who sacrificed in many ways and surrendered their lives so that we could be free. Their dreams have become reality. Freedom is their reward.
    We are both humbled and elevated by the honour and privilege that you, the people of South Africa, have bestowed on us, as the first president of a united, democratic, non-racial and non-sexist South Africa, to lead our country our of the valley of darkness.
    We understand it is still that there is no easy road to freedom. We know it well that none of us acting alone can achieve success. We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a New World. Let there be justice for all. Let there be peace for all. Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all.
    Let each know that for each the body, the mind and the soul have been freed to fulfil themselves.
    Never, never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world.
    Let freedom reign. The sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement. God bless Africa. Thank you.
     
  14. Chuck64

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    I remember riding to school on that big yellow bus (route 70) one morning, and hearing on the radio that Nelson Mandela was released from prison. I jumped up and whooped and then slowly realized that no one else on the bus gave a damn. I spent the rest of the day kind of spaced out thinking about that. That's probably the first time I realized that most people don't care about events outside of their little bubble. This was in 6th or 7th grade. I didn't really know who Nelson Mandela was or what the circumstances were in South Africa. I just knew he was a good man fighting for good things.

    Everything I've read by Maya Angelou has touched my soul.
    I'm not a big fan of Dr. King's speeches (just the great things he did), or of JFK or FDR in general.

    The greatest work I've read is Martin Luther's "Christian Questions and their Answers" from the Small Catechism. I know it's old, and not a speech, but it's a quick read when you need a little direction, easy to understand, and at least for me, helps keep my life going in the right direction.
     
  15. Sam1070

    Sam1070 New Member

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    I have a dream speech by Martin Luther King...anything by Winston Churchill.
     
  16. Webster

    Webster New Member

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    Gandhi said that we have to be the change we want to see in the world....
     
  17. windtalkerways

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    I agree with that concept, Webster.

    Everything in this entire world began
    with an idea...and them some action
    upon it.
     
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