The real reason for the Japanese internment of WWII?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by captain garbonzo, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. captain garbonzo

    captain garbonzo New Member

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    Interesting that is not mentioned much in history books or by scholars. I never heard of this until recently. This should be included as a part of the history of the Pearl Harbor attack but for whatever reason, it is left out.

    The Niihau Incident HistoryNet


    Not only that but in Brazil during WWII, which had over 200,000 Japanese immigrants who were not interned but moved inland from the coast of Brazil, there were 'underground' nationalistic fanatical groups such as the murderous Shindo Renmei (of which it is hard to find much info in english) operating, coming out into the open after the war, to spread Japanese imperialism, even going so far to spread false propaganda that Japan had not lost the war. Shindo Renmei claimed to have over 100,000 members.

    It's a shame that the Japanese were removed to internment maps from the west coast of the USA but in light of little known facts like this, along with the fact that there was so much anti-Japanese sentiment at the time, perhaps the internment camps were the safest place for both the US security and the Japanese-American citizens security.

    Japanese imperialism loyalty was a serious issue back then (anyone remember the film of the Emperor giving a radio speech to the Japanese people about surrender to the USA and seeing the people crying?). It's a different frame of mind than most americans can comprehend.

    In hind sight one can say it was not necessary to intern them, but what was our national security technology like at the time and how much of that money needed for covert security was needed for the war? How many were actually loyal to the Emperor and would have picked their 'first culture' over their adopted one if they were asked to spy? Not a question anyone can answer but a reasonable and logical question nonetheless, given the facts.

    The real crime of the internment to me was that many of them, upon release after the war, did not get their homes and businesses back, unless they were cared for by their non-japanese friends and neighbors during the internment. And they should have been compensated for their time in the camps, immediately after the war, so as to get back to where they were before the big mess.......

    I'm not anti-Japanese at all. As a matter of fact I enjoy Japanese culture (and women) immensely....... But I find the topic fascinating, in that it's politically correct to say the Japanese Internment was a big shame on the history of the USA, and yet there were reasons beyond mere racism on our part, I believe. There are always two sides to every story...and in some cases more than two.
     
    #1 captain garbonzo, Feb 28, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  2. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    OMG!

    there was nothing shameful or incorrect about it at all (or the nuking of Japan)

    when political correctness and libtard anti-Americanism resulted in the dispensation of reparations checks, guess what country was part of the mailing address? (hint, it wasn't the USA)

    BTW, check the history books -- there were internment camps for citizens of the other Axis powers (Italy & Germany) as well, some of them here in south Texas

    wonder why you don't hear as much about them?

    think about it
     
  3. THEDUDEofDestiny

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    i think there is a clearly difference from what we find morally and ethically acceptable today and what was morally and ethically acceptable in other time periods and historical circumstances. on the one hand we must judge the decision by the standards of its own time, as captain garbonzo is doing, and yet we must not lose sight of the fact that it is morally objectionable. it is a fine line to walk.
     
  4. THEDUDEofDestiny

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    Nick4444 makes a good point about the existence of european internment camps and the way they don't have the same profile as the japanese ones, and in some cases are outright denied. it is probably mostly a case of german and italian descendants finding it easier to americanize and shed most hints of their ethnice identities. the japanese, especially in california, were set a part much longer and had stricter internal traditions that placed them at odds with the main stream. the lasting effect of all this is that japanese americans have a better sense of ethnic identity than any class of european americans and are better organized to fight politically for what they perceive as their interests. there doesn't have to be any kind of politically correct conspiracy, just good old fashioned money and votes talking
     
  5. B_Nick4444

    B_Nick4444 New Member

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    or Nick4444 could be correct in implying leftist revisionism and tendentious twisting of facts and contexts to build the case for an irrational, racist motivation behind the internment
     
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