The Shiwa Tour

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by steve319, Oct 9, 2005.

  1. steve319

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    This past week I had the opportunity to enjoy the Shiwa Tour, a Tibetan Buddhist cultural awareness presentation that has been hitting colleges, universities, community centers, and churches around the East Coast. I’d recommend that, if you get a chance at all, you go see this moving and fascinating peek into the life and cultural traditions of this community of monks.

    I’ve known and befriended a few Buddhists in my time, and they’ve always made me feel that humanity may not be totally screwed up in every instance just by the nature of our biology. Well, after meeting these four gentlemen, I am even more encouraged. I’ve been reassured by the serenity and kindness they exude.

    I pride myself on being grounded and carrying a degree of peaceful, loving tranquility, but THESE guys? They are the real thing. Though it may be unrealistic given the nature of human interaction and the complexity of the world, I find myself wishing that we all could display a larger share of these values.

    They chanted, prayed, played music, demonstrated their “debate” process, performed a dance or two, and answered questions (in endearingly broken English). Plus they spent three days assembling this incredible sand mandala—breathtaking. All in all, a real highlight of the week for me.

    Anyway, I feel like I’m late to the party here because the tour is almost over now, but there are several dates left in NC, a few in Louisville, KY, and one in Charlottesville, VA, so if you get a chance, go meet these fellows and realize, just for a moment, that life has dimensions outside our aggressive, selfish, consumerist norm.

    Details can be found HERE.

    "May all beings be well and happy always."
     
  2. Dr. Dilznick

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    "Thou shalt have no other gods before me."
     
  3. surferboy

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    Yah, because everyone's a Christian, or a Jew, or a Muslim. And, there are no gods in Buddhism.
     
  4. Dr. Dilznick

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    Buddha is revered as a god, though.

    Steve is a Christian.
     
  5. surferboy

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    Buddha is revered as a god, though.

    Steve is a Christian.
    [post=350585]Quoted post[/post]​
    [/b][/quote]

    Uhm, no, the Buddha is not revered as a god. Not like the Judeo-Christian god is. So that's a bad analogy. And so what if he's Christian? Can't he expand his horizons?
     
  6. GottaBigOne

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    Atheism rocks!
     
  7. madame_zora

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    Looks like there's quite a few dates in Louisvilly Ky, I might be able to catch one of those. I love investigating different religious practises, one of the best ones was a couple years ago I ended up my accident in the Hare Krisnha complex in Dallas Texas. It turned out to be an amazing day as they invited me to share in the worship celebration after I had dinner. Good times.

    Nomatter what religion you hold primary, learning about other cultures and religions is a must if your opinions are to hold any credibility at all. If in your fear you won't listen to the words of another, your faith is shallow and your beliefs flimsy.
     
  8. GottaBigOne

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    I agree about learning about different cultures madam, but i must diverge with you about Hare Krishnas. There was a festival they held in washington square park a few years ago and I spent a good two hours debating with a guy who had a booth there, and he could not come up with one good point about anything about his beliefs, they were just blind assertions with little or no evidence to back them up, some actually went against scientific discovery. Im not sure buit it think he even said that the sun went around the earth. He also said that while sperm has a soul, the ovum doesn't, which i find to be incredibly sexist, not to mentionhilarious because then that means I've had entire holocausts occur during my wet dreams.
     
  9. Dr. Dilznick

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    You just described every religion in existence.
     
  10. madame_zora

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    You just described every religion in existence.
    [post=350617]Quoted post[/post]​
    [/b][/quote]

    Gottabigone, I've got to concur with Dilznick here. I don't have to accept any religion's POV to find it interesting to learn about. To expect any type of realistic dialogue to occur with such a person would just be pissing in the wind.
     
  11. steve319

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    Wait a minute, I get enough cries of sacrilege in person. I don’t need that from here too. ;)

    <!--QuoteBegin-Dr. Dilznick
    @Oct 11 2005, 01:12 PM
    Steve is a Christian.
    [/quote]
    That needs a footnote. Not sure they’d claim me, anyway.

    Yeah, I am a man of faith. I choose to believe in a creator (and it is a choice for me), but I can&#39;t believe in the exclusivity of any one path (or, for that matter, I can&#39;t think that it&#39;s necessary to have a path at all). Although Christian concepts of forgiveness and compassion might inform my worldview and be a part of the way I handle my own self-actualization, I grow from my interaction with other spiritual traditions as well. But that&#39;s just me.

    That’s one of (many, many) reasons the majority of the faithful have no patience for me.

    If I can experience a bit of peace and hope from the serenity of these monks and renew myself a bit, then the experience will have been worthwhile for me.

    So kindly get off my ass. ;)

    Hey, has anyone read The Singular Pilgrim? Just picked up a copy today on the recommendation of a friend (who happens to be agnostic).
     
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