The UK General Election Poll

Discussion in 'Politics' started by flame boy, Apr 20, 2010.

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Who will you be voting for in the 2010 UK General Election

  1. Conservative

    12 vote(s)
    13.3%
  2. Labour

    14 vote(s)
    15.6%
  3. Liberal Democrats

    38 vote(s)
    42.2%
  4. Other

    12 vote(s)
    13.3%
  5. I won't be voting

    14 vote(s)
    15.6%
  1. flame boy

    flame boy Account Disabled

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    So the upcoming UK election is just around the corner. This is the poll where you can cast your vote and see who the LPSG membership would select as their PM.

    You can only vote once, so only make your selection when you are really sure that party gets your vote!
     
    #1 flame boy, Apr 20, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  2. Joll

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    Tories. :p *goes off to steal some horses*

    Hopefully can go back to Labour in 4 years if they sort their heads out...
     
  3. gingernuts

    gingernuts Member

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    Looks like we are headed for a hung parliament
     
  4. Joll

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    That's exactly what Flameboy's hoping for. :wink:
     
  5. Sergeant_Torpedo

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    Successful European governments have for years been coalitions. The term hung parliament is a misnomer: it is used by journalists to frighten the old ladies. After the first few days of discussion a very representative government emerges. But us Brits will continue to have the wool pulled over our eyes - the manipulative elites know how to divide and rule.
     
  6. D_Ted Riding Hooded

    D_Ted Riding Hooded New Member

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    I wouldn't select any of the three 'main' party leaders as my PM, but as I live in neither Kirkcaldy & Cowdenbeath, Witney or Sheffield Hallam I haven't got the choice to vote against them! :rolleyes:

    I will be voting Labour though, as we've got an excellent local MP...and our council is run by a Tory/Lib Dem 'alliance'....and we've seen at first hand the mess those two create if in power together!!

    Whether Labour win the election or not, they really must go back to their roots!
     
  7. D_Ted Riding Hooded

    D_Ted Riding Hooded New Member

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    Just a side note..why are the Tory and Labour colours the wrong way 'round? :eek:
     
  8. Jason

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    Labour use red as the red of socialism, the blood drenched-banner of the workers, to keep the red flag flying (a song they sing at their conference).

    The Tories from their origins took the colours of the Union Jack - the Conservative and Unionist party and the Tory party that it springs from is the party of the Union. When Labour started using red it became convenient to switch to just blue.
     
  9. dongalong

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    The closest thing to Ron Paul in the UK is the UK Independence party (UKIP) I'd vote for them, I like how they expose corruption in the European parliament and want smaller government.
    Unfortunately they don't have the same following as the major parties and their small government approach will be unpopular with many. Their manifesto includes encouraging manufacturing in the UK (remember the industrial revolution? It made us rich!) - that is the main reason for my support.
     
  10. Ric1

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    Lib dems got a good MP tory run concil who have made a right tits up of running where I live.
     
  11. TomCat84

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    Question from a curious American: I thought I had read somewhere that the Liberal Democrats were a splinter group from Labour.
     
  12. Jason

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    In origin the Liberals are the old Whig party, while the Conservatives are the old Tory party, both eighteenth century in origin. But Liberal fortunes ran low through the twentieth century. They have mopped up a splinter from the Labour party - and changed their name to Liberal Democrat. They try to position themselves as the centre party, though arguably many of their present policies are to the left of Labour.

    It is very hard to see how the Lib Dems could ever do a deal with the Conservatives. Ideologically they are too different. But there is past history of Lib and Lab working together. It seems as if we are now looking at a Lib-Lab government with Gordon Brown as PM and a Lib Dem as Chancellor.
     
  13. Catchoftheday

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    Yes well there was the SDP, which was a splinter group from the Labour Party and then ..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Democratic_Party_(UK)
     
  14. dandelion

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    In 1974 Ted Heath the sitting conservative prime minister was returned after the election with slighlty fewer MPs than labour. He attempted to form a coalition government, with amongst others the liberals. negotiations foundered because the libs didnt really have enough MPs to form a majority with Heath, and because the price, as still now, was a move to proportional representation. The conservatives have also formed coalitions with liberals.

    In this case, it would seem labour have already agreed the price Heath would not pay. I suspect Cameron would not be willing to give up his entrenched position as was the case with Heath, but I doubt it would go down well with electors if he explained this now.

    However, I think we might all be better served if we end up with a loose coalition where libs support a government on confidence votes, but agree to disagree on various issues important to them and leave it to the house to decide how the vote falls. It is supposed to be a debating chamber to decide such things, not the prime minister's rubber stamp. If liberals side with labour on some things and conservatives on others, so be it.
     
  15. Sergeant_Torpedo

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    Party colours: the pressent designations are relatively recent. Red was chosen because of Blair's red rose, nothing to do with the blood of socialist martyrs. Up until the 1980s there was regional, even local, variations but generally Tories chose red, Liberals chose blue and Labour sported green favours. Incidentally Westminster Palace engraved notepaper headings are green for the Commons and red for the Peers.
     
  16. Catchoftheday

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    Reference for Red flag - Search.com

    The red flag was the emblem of the British Labour Party from its inception until the Labour Party Conference of 1986 when it was replaced by a red rose. The red rose has subsequently been adopted by a number of other socialist and social-democratic parties throughout Europe. Members of the party would also sing the traditional anthem The Red Flag (see below) at the conclusion of the annual party conference, but this was also dropped in 1999. In October 2003 the song made a return and was sung along with Jerusalem. In February 2006 the Red Flag was sung in Parliament to mark the centenary of the Labour Party's founding
     
    #16 Catchoftheday, Apr 20, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  17. Jason

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    Jerusalem is an excellent choice.

    The hymn is both a staple of public school assemblies (ie private schools for US readers) and trades union rallies - a truly non-political, non-class song. It comes from a book synopsis written by John Milton. Milton believed that the Garden of Eden was situated in the SE of England (and the Tree of Knowledge on the site now occupied by Lambeth Palace). As Christ spoke to Adam and Eve in Eden it follows that indeed Those Feet of the Holy Lamb of God were in ancient times in England. Milton believed that the New Jerusalem would be built in London, and his hymn encourages the British to aspire to this goal.

    The one good thing that might come from this election (and I'm probably clutching at straws) is the collapse of Labour. In origin a red socialist party believing in nationalisation of the commanding heights of the economy as a step towards the communist utopia, the Labour party has been transformed into a Euro-socialist party, and for 13 years has persued more centrist policies. Yet it still has a vicious streak and I would love to see it marginalised in UK politics so that it cannot do more damage to people. Maybe in this election the Liberals can make enough progress to become the true home of the centre left.
     
  18. dandelion

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    What I really think is we'll see what happens in a few weeks time, but otherwise its anyones guess. It is still possible for the conservatives to win outright and labour then to simply drop into the standard no. 2 slot waiting their turn.

    However, if the liberals do manage to pull off a good showing, the conservatives insist they would have nothing to do with them in coalition, which unless they make a pact with labour means they will not run the next government. Its not clear to me that lib and lab can easily form a coalition, but if they do or if they can further break the traditional mold by agreeing to disagree and voting different ways on certain issues, then the two might make a success of weathering the current storm. Then in 5 years come back as the crisis victors on a PR wave, with conservatives even further annihilated.

    I find it very hard to predict what the actual outcome would be under the new PR or semi pr system which will then be in force. Logically the right ought to be able to regroup and make a block for itself, but the position of the liberals has always been a bit anomalous. It isn't the English national party, yet in some ways it is.
     
  19. Jason

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    I think it is beyond prediction. But it's like picking at a spot - hard to stop.

    * Outright Con win - yes it is possible still.
    * Con minority - again possible, with the SNP and PC getting whatever they want. CUP is now with the Conservatives and the DUP may come on board, and SF don't take up their seats.
    * Lib-Lab pact - possible though very fragile.
    * Con-Lab pact. A wildcard. A bad defeat for Lab would fragment the party. It is within the bounds of possibility that Darling might continue as Chancellor (supported by a Lab faction) in a Con administration.
    * No viable government. Entirely possible.

    The silly situation is that if people vote for a hung parliament they are voting for a stitch up that no-one has voted for. For example does anyone of any party like the idea of a Con+Darlingite Lab government?

    The real problem is that the markets will move against a UK without a strong government. They won't be polite and hang around to see if it might work. In fact they will see to it that it won't work.

    If really pushed I think right now the most likely outcome is hung parliament with a try at a Lib-Lab pact, loss of AAA credit rating, sterling crisis, and in no time a slump into no viable government and another election.

    The most dangerous view floating around right now is that a hung parliament could work and would even be a good thing. The structures of the Wetminster parliament were deliberately set up to make a hung parliament unworkable so that the UK has a strong government.
     
    #19 Jason, Apr 20, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010
  20. tomthelad91

    tomthelad91 New Member

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    I shall be voting Lib Dem.
    Not only because I agree with their policies, but because Labour need to be punished yet I will never ever vote CONservative.

    Labour stand for nothing now, thanks to Blair. They invaded Iraq and Afghanistan illegally and were never really punished for it.
    I hope Labour lose, they go away, sort them selves out, move back slightly to the left and get a real leader in charge to unite the party then I'll vote for them next time round.
     
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