Thinking about renouncing my American citizenship... any advice?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by UpwardCurve, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. UpwardCurve

    UpwardCurve New Member

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    I am doing this for a myriad of reasons. First of all, I have a stable job, and a good woman waiting for me back in korea (lol got nothing like this in america), and i hope to be a korean citizen. And after marriage, i dont want to deal with visa renewal issues or the risk of getting kicked out, etc. and i want the benefits

    Second, I have had it. With both political parties (i am an independent with libertarian values). I refuse to deal with the carbon taxes, the wars, the rampant abuse on all levels, the crime, our water source poisoning by flouride, our failing infrastructure, the hidden budgets, the waste, pedophile politicians (it is way more common than the media will let you believe, and it occurs in all levels), the loss of freedoms, corporate media (which arrogantly calls individuals who can think for themselves the "fringe" and if they are a majority they are called "the mob" -how convenient), everything. I know for a fact that we will never have a stable government that makes good decisions. And i will not give them any of my tax money to support this shit. Nor do I want my kids to deal with this (did you know that school kids in korea can walk home alone safely at night from school? Try doing that in my neighboorhood!) . I am well aware there is corruption in every country (especially korea) but none as high as in the U.S.

    Now then, how do I go about doing such a deed and what should i expect? :biggrin1:
     
    #1 UpwardCurve, Aug 5, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  2. petetown

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    The Netherlandsm maybe, but KOREA????
    Bye, have fun.
     
  3. DiscoBoy

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    How about a dual citizenship (if it's possible)?
     
  4. UpwardCurve

    UpwardCurve New Member

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    No, it is not allowed. And like i said, i am not paying taxes to both countries.
     
  5. invisibleman

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    Every person has a path they must walk in life. Do what you feel is right for you. Go where your heart will be happy. Wish you well.
     
  6. Steinweg9

    Steinweg9 New Member

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    I cannot say I blame you. I too am a Libertarian. I do not believe anyone is capable of "governing" anyone else. It's an outmoded system backdating to the centuries of royalty. I don't need no stinkin' king. and I'll be damned if there'll be a queen over me. No bitch tells me what to do, ever.
    So, yes. For many decades, immigrants have said that, even with all its faults, the United States is the place to live. No longer. It's becoming a big mess. But understand that, at the bottom of everything is a pack of abusive attorneys who stand, under our present system, to make piles of money off of all of it. And our current Man is nothing more than a lawyer turned politician. The worst of the worst.
    Yes, other countries are safer to live in. Vienna is safe at night. Police stand with billy clubs within earshot of one another there. Europe, in general, has become sane. Finland is a great place to live and work.
    Etc., etc.
    Oh well, it might take time to make the change you want to make, but get started. Be certain that, if at any point along the way you change your mind, you can reneg.
    Dual citizenship is the way to go. That way you can say, The US is a nice place to visit, but I don't have to live there.
    In the end, we are headed toward a one-world government, fast. The people of the earth have to see an attempt at that fail horribly (and it absolutely will) before we raise our collective consciousness to personal responsibility. In that respect, the American Experiment has made one step forward and two steps back.
     
  7. Gnothiseauton

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    I would go to your local social security office or contact your local representative. Be advised that if you tell a senator or a housemember that you no longer want to be a citizen, I'm sure somewhere somehow DHS will probably check you out. I can actually agree with you to an extent on certain thing, specially about Europe, but as someone who is in the process of naturalization, I find it ironic that i want in so bad, and you want out. Grass is always greener on the other side buddy!
     
    #7 Gnothiseauton, Aug 5, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  8. MalakingTiti

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    You seem to have thought it through, and have good reasons. Fuck it. Renounce!
     
  9. Dave NoCal

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    It sounds like you have decided. See ya.
    Dave
     
  10. bigbull29

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    Yes, I suffer from CIC (cultural identity crisis).:biggrin1:
     
  11. Principessa

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    Bye, and don't let the door hit you where the good Lord split you. :cool:

    Perhaps it's because I'm a black woman, but I have no delusions of moving anywhere else and being treated better than I am here. That does not mean racism is over in America. It just means that in some ways we deal with it better.
     
    #11 Principessa, Aug 5, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  12. Deno

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    The grass is always green on the other side of the fence until you get on the other side of the fence.
     
  13. MrToolhung

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    If you can I would hold onto your American Citizenship. Explore the options more as the US does recognize dual citizenship. My bf is in the same position as you and at one point wanted to do the same as you. I told him that would not be a good move just in case things changed that we could move to the USA. The same would go for me, I would not renounce my Canadian Citizenship either.

    Here you are trying to get out and I would love to get in :mad: I lived in the States for 7 years and finally gave up because of the visa hassles. If I had an offer for a job and a green card tomorrow I would go. But I don't see that happening anytime soon. So, I can understand what you are saying about visa requirements, etc. It does get difficult and there not many options besides that one that you mentioned.
     
  14. vince

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    You should think carefully about it and research the tax implications. There is a tax treaty between the US and Korea which provides a mechanism for expats to avoid being double taxed. If you renounce, you might be giving up your right to collect your US social security which you must have paid into.

    You'll have to do your own research. You're not going to find many answers on a big cock website.
     
  15. boerkie

    boerkie New Member

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    i have to tell you, as an immigrant, that had to jump all kinds of hoops to get to where i am under immigration and naturalization law, your comment about renouncing has me aghast!!
    a goose-bumped!! GRIN!!
    maybe koreans have it sooo much easier than south africans to become naruralized. not EVEN MENTIONING citizenship!! its a bitch, that process.
    for you, it might be easy come, easy go, you would be able to truthfully self-judge.
    this sure as fuck aint heaven, but having lived all over, it sure is the closest i have found!!
     
  16. BobLeeSwagger

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    I agree. There really aren't any benefits to renouncing at this point. By choosing to live in another country, he's made the political statement he needs to make.
     
  17. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

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    Straight up, I have to say, don't give it up. I'm older and I'll tell ya, everyone I know who has expatriated has never regretted keeping American citizenship and relying on it as a final security. I've friend who have moved to western Europe and Asia and all of them have kept their citizenship in case the shit hits the fan. It might sound absurd or silly at this point in time, but don't underestimate the power of history. South Korea is not a true democracy as we know it and its existance is under a threat that the US does not have. My cousin married a South Korean citizen and he and his wife have decided to be Americans for the sake of their children should anything happen over there.

    This may sound patriarchal and stupid and imperialistic, but in the end, I think you'll regret your decision. American citizenship is a very valuable thing and acts as a life insurance policy for anyone living outside the country. You enjoy certain privileges and preferences without knowing it. You have, in the end, the right of protection afforded by the most powerful country in the world. Billions of people around the world would love to have what you do. Please don't squander it because everyone I know who has been in a similar position has regretted it; sometimes in ways they never foresaw.
     
  18. TheWB

    TheWB New Member

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    do whatever's best for the $, not over some emotional bs
     
  19. gymfresh

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    In the past some have found formally renouncing US citizenship to have had financial advantages, because the US was the only industrialized country to tax your income based on your citizenship, rather than your country of residence. But in recent years the trend has been for other countries to follow this example and negotiate tax equalization treaties with other countries.

    The question of dual citizenship may not be as black-and-white as you think. The US did a major about-face around around 1990 that shifted a lot of the burden of proof from you to the government of why you should or shouldn't retain US citizenship when you take another. Basically, you now have a stronger case for keeping your US citizenship, should you want it and not make a formal renunciation of it directly to US officials, if you can prove you retain strong ties to family in the US, business interests in the US and/or property you own in the US, and that it would cause you undue harm to lose preferred status in your dealings, particularly if you come back often.

    A very reasonable summary of where things stand at the moment can be found here. If you're interested, I can tell you the sad tale of a friend of mine who failed to educate himself before he married a woman in Barcelona and took Spanish citizenship. It ended OK, but not without years of drama and bullying by US officials. It's a cautionary story of why you must line your eggs up before you go messing with any other citizenship.

    Some of us have properly navigated the even trickier situation of holding more than two citizenships, though my circumstances are rather different from yours. On the plus side, when done correctly it's nice be taken as a local on more than one continent. Best of luck.
     
    #19 gymfresh, Aug 6, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2009
  20. HazelGod

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    I pretty much concur with the sensible respondents so far. Go live as an expat in Korea for a while. If at some point down the line, you feel the need to formally renounce your US citizenship, walk into the embassy and begin the process.

    My own viewpoints are very libertarian as well, and a lot of the same thoughts have been coalescing in my own mind. Right now, I'm seriously considering taking another position in my company somewhere in western Europe. The sad truth of the matter is that there are far too many fucking idiots here in the US for the nation to be successfully managed in a truly democratic fashion.

    There are a few key changes that would give it a fighting chance, but I don't see any of these happening anytime soon:

    1. Redefine citizenship to a status that must be earned by everyone. You shouldn't get to vote just because your mom jumped the border to squeeze you out, or because you come from ten generations of uneducated pig-fucking sodbusters.

    2. Legislative term limits, at all levels of government. No more "career" politicians who remain entrenched on family name recognition and lobbyist influence.

    3. Executive line-item veto. I'm more than sick of legislators attaching onerous riders and amendments to omnibus appropriations bills to slip them past the threat of a veto.

    4. Abolish the "winner-takes-all" method of tabulating votes. It's beyond retarded that almost half the people in the state of Texas voted for Obama, yet the entire block of the state's electors cast for McCain. I'm not asking for perfection, but the present system isn't even close to being representative of the people's will.


    Since I've got a better chance of selling snow-cones in Hell, I'm going to keep looking for a nice little flat in Rome...
     
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