This story should HAVE never been printed.

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by DGirl, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. DGirl

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    http://www.kmbc.com/news/14380246/detail.html



    Blind Man Says Postal Clerk Didn't Help Him
    POSTED: 3:49 pm CDT October 19, 2007
    UPDATED: 5:53 pm CDT October 19, 2007

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- A blind man who was trying to mail a package said he was mistreated and denied help at the post office.

    On Thursday, Roger Francis was trying to mail a piece of medical equipment at the Independence Avenue post office when he asked a clerk for help addressing the package.

    Francis said he was denied help.



    "She didn't tell me to go to the back of the line, they out and out refused help," Francis told KMBC's Dion Lim. "People who are visually impaired or handicapped are generally not refused help."

    Francis said he ended up going home and wasting $20 on a cab ride to the post office.

    "This is asinine. You don't do this," said Pamela Francis, Roger's wife, who is also legally blind.

    Service manager Rowland Tidmore said it's against the U.S. Post Office's policy to address packages for customers.

    "It's supposed to be ready for mailing at the counter. It takes the liability away from us," Tidmore said.

    Tidmore said the clerk offered the man assistance after other customers had been helped.

    "The customer didn't want to wait and he left the building," Tidmore said.

    He said he apologized to the couple for any misunderstanding.

    Pamela Francis said this isn't true.

    "All he did was justify what this woman did, and she was going by the guidelines, which is crap," Pamela Francis said.

    "I don't want special treatment. I just wanted help mailing this off," Roger Francis said.

    Tidmore said the clerk who helped Roger Francis is one of his best workers.
     
  2. DGirl

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    I worked in the post office for 8 years and this story pisses me off!!
    If the person did not help him then he should have asked for the PERSON IN CHARGE. Since he did NOT I do NOT believe him!!!!!!!!! Plus, why did'nt his wife address the darn package?!? Or was their to help him?
    The clerk is NOT suppose to address packages in the first place!!!!!!!!
     
  3. DGirl

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    Sorry about the 1000 post with the same title. It would not save!! So, I did it again and angin.:eek:
     
  4. HazelGod

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    Every US Post Office that I've walked into during the last 5 years has multiple video cameras covering the customer lobby from every angle. The truth of these events would be easy to verify.


    Did you see the part of the article that tells you his wife is also legally blind?
     
  5. frizzle

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    I agree completely with what the clerk did. If he had signed it off and posted it, he would of been at extreme risk and risked losing his job.
     
  6. DC_DEEP

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    There are some details obviously missing from the article.

    If it were just an average parcel, yes, it should have been addressed and ready for postage when the customer arrived at the service desk.

    But the article mentions that it was a medical device. The customer most likely had to fill out a special label for insurance or delivery confirmation. A legally blind customer may have had trouble finding precisely the label needed, and may have needed help in filling it out. My (corrected) vision is pretty good, and I've had trouble at times, locating exactly the label I needed. In that situation, someone not working at the service desk should have given assistance. There are ALWAYS people working "in the back" at any post office.

    I've been to many different post offices before, all over this country. The service you receive depends on the location, and even more, depends on the individual to whom you speak. I've seen some that were downright hateful, and some that were exceptionally helpful. It's a crap shoot most of the time.
     
  7. Shelby

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    If postal service was subject to free market competition it would be a whole lot better.

    The good news is that it's rapidly approaching extinction.
     
  8. DC_DEEP

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    Not quite on the mark, Shelby. The USPS is in an unenviable position. You are aware that it is self-funded, right? Not your tax dollars. The government treats the USPS as a government agency (when it's convenient) and as an autonomous business (when that's convenient.) They are bound by federal laws, but don't receive the benefits. Have you ever wondered why the website is USPS dot com, and not dot gov?

    They earn all their own revenues, but the Treasury Department feels free to dip into their reserves at will. They lose revenue by the millions to non-profit mailings. The federal government was reimbursing the USPS a small amount on those losses, but intends to stop that practice.

    As for it becoming extinct, I hope not. I still enjoy sending and receiving hand-written letters and cards from time to time. Getting a "Happy Anniversary" email just is not the same as a "Happy Anniversary" card. And sending packages by USPS is not as expensive as sending them by UPS or FedEx.
     
  9. SpeedoGuy

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    And we all know that USPS workers, those uncompetetive slackers, have some much free time to goof off at work that they'd never get stressed out or become violent.
     
  10. B_NineInchCock_160IQ

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    yeah, yippee, when there is no more USPS we can pay anywhere from 2-10 times as much shipping with DHL, FexEx, or UPS and get the same shitty service. I hate all those companies, they fucking suck. USPS has been more reliable every time in my experience.
     
  11. Osiris

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    As a Postal Worker's son, I can tell you they are hardly slackers. My father was a sorter, ran a route he did most every task at the main post office in Kansas City and was eventually promoted to Rail Car Supervision and Inspection.

    The clerk did the right thing on a policy wise, but she could have taken a different tack. I have seen many a postal employee refuse to help while "on the clock", but finish there work up, take a break, and help the person needing help while they made it very clear they were not in their official capacity. At some of the smaller substations, they have generated their own forms to fend off liability by having the person sign it. In this case when the person is blind, that changes things.

    My question though is if both are legally blind and the machine was a medical device, wouldn't it stand to reason the company would have either sent a label to the people or set up a pick up call with FedEx, DHL, or UPS for the item. At the very least, there are usually aids for couples in this sort of position. Why didn't they have a person with sight fill out the address labels for them? At the very least, I am sure there was a neighbor who would have done it for them. This isn't a new policy and has been in effect ever since I can remember.
     
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