time gerrymandering

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by kalipygian, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. kalipygian

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    So, when we are getting plenty of daylight, they give us an hour, and when we have little, they take it away. Maybe it makes sense to someone. Don't really care where the politicians set the clock, but don't see any purpose to moving it back and forth. (never got around to changing the clock in the car last fall, now I don't have to, I hope I can remember that is 'right' again:smile:)

    Alaska goes from 130w to 172e longitute, so would be in 6 different time zones, at this latitude they cover less distance than to the south. We presently are in practice in 2, we used to be in practice in 5. All the state except the outer Aleutians, the Near Islands (the Russians named them) is in the same zone. So part of the state is over 3 hours off solar time. The state capitol in the southeastern part of the state used to be on the same time as Seattle, when there was a campaign to move the capitol closer to the center of the state, the people in the capitol, to head this off, moved closer in zones to the rest of the state. Where I am in southcentral used to be on the same time as Hawaii, we are at the same longitute, now we are an hour off.
     
  2. SpeedoGuy

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    I think the practice of adjusting the clocks each spring and fall causes far more problems than its worth. Whatever that is.
     
  3. SteveHd

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    Yeah, that's my thinking too. I think we should advance an hour in the fall and then return to standard time in the summer. One downside would be: December sunrises would be after 8am in many areas. But I'd rather have a 6:30pm sunset in December than an 8:30pm sunset in June.

    But overall, it isn't worth the hassle.
     
  4. viking1

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    I agree. I also hate these time changes and don't see what they do.
     
  5. headbang8

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    Good question.

    My understanding is that originally, as part of the New Deal, if memory serves, the powers that be decided that the extra hours of sunlight we earn from longer summer days should be distributed to the evening, so we 9-5 working schmucks can enjoy them.

    Historically, it also meant that we consumed less energy. More people awake during the daylight hours meant fewer hours burning light globes. That's the official reason for the prolonged Daylight Time this year.

    But I wonder if that's really so. It seems to be that the humble light globe eats up very little energy compared to the air conditioner. Nowadays, any daytime activity in the summer demands one, at least where I live.

    But I guess the econometricians have balanced that all out.
     
  6. dong20

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  7. viking1

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    The energy savings may pan out during the summer months. I don't see how it can help to start this early with DST though. Now I will have to burn lights when I get up in the morning for a few weeks and have the headlights on my car too. I haven't had to do that for a few weeks now. What is the difference from burning lights in the morning or evening? I have never understood that. When the days get longer and the sun comes up sooner no lights will be needed in the morning. What does adding a month to DST like they did this year save?
     
  8. headbang8

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    Dong,

    That political party operates ONLY in the state of Western Australia. Much of Australia already observes daylight savings time--a comparatively recent development.

    One item the party doesn't mention is that during the summer months the time-zone change across Australia gets to the point where it actually needs to be managed. Unlike the west coast of the USA, Western Australia, with a population of only a million or so, is terribly dependent on the opposite coast.

    Perth stockbrokers tend to be OK about getting to work at seven, to be on deck when the national exchange opens in Melbourne at nine. Getting them up for six tends to grate. But to run that argument would be a tacet admission of their own insignificance.

    I lived in Australia when the eastern states adopted DST, and some of the opponents had a point or two. The major cities of Australia are not quite so far south as the major cities of the northern hemisphere are to the north, so the need is far less. They bask in a Mediterranean climate, which generally means a cool breeze accompanies sundown, and the difference between day and night temperature is far greater than in temperate zones, or the tropics. An early arrival of the evening may actually be much more helpful to normal life.

    And the state of Queensland, sliced in two by the tropic of Capricorn, saw no reason at all to change, since it was so close to the equator. Of course, anti-progressive parochial politics came into it, too. (It's not for nothing that Australians refer to Queensland as the Deep North.) I believe the Premier at the time is on record as saying the extra hour of sunlight in the evening would fade everyone's curtains.

    I remember flying to Queensland at the time. The pilot announced, "We'll soon be landing in Brisbane. Please remember to set your watches back one hour...and your calendar back fifty years!"
     
  9. dong20

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    No doubt, it's just I remembered hearing about it and it amused me. As for daylight saving so long as I remember and don't turn up places an hour early (or late) my interest in the subject ends there.

    I've crossed the dateline a couple of times, that was weird enough.....:smile:
     
  10. kalipygian

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    The dateline passes through the Aleutian Islands; Amatignak Island is the westernmost point and Semisopochnoi the eastern most point in the US, Amchitka, Kiska, Buldir, Shemya, Agattu, and Attu are on the tomorrow side of it, but it is ignored.The Komandorski Islands are a continuation of the Aleutians that the Russians kept.

    I've wondered why the fundies aren't bothered by messing with 'god's time'.
     
  11. SteveHd

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    Some are. An aunt of mine called DST "Devil's time".
     
  12. kalipygian

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    I would support doubling June and July and reducing January and February to one day each. That would save a lot of energy, in the north at least, used for heating and lighting.:biggrin1:
     
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