Totally off the subject of sex and large penises.... but oh well!

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by IntoxicatingToxin, Dec 8, 2006.

  1. IntoxicatingToxin

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    I have horrible dry skin all year round, but in winter, it's so much worse! I was wondering if anyone in here had this issue and what their idea was to solve it? About the best thing I've found so far is to mix vaseline with my lotion... it seems to help a TON! But with regular lotion, I have to apply it at least 4-5 times a day if not more so my skin doesn't get dry and ashy! I don't want to have to use vaseline anymore if I don't have to, but I can't find any lotions that really do the trick, no matter what kind of dry skin they're for! Any ideas??
     
  2. socoken

    socoken New Member

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    I use a humidifier in my bedroom in the winter, seems to help me out.
     
  3. happyfeet

    happyfeet New Member

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    Drink way more water.

    My daughter has really dry skin. So dry that in the winter, sometimes the skin on her hands cracks and bleeds. I make her drink a ton of water, b/c the best hydration comes from the inside. I also make sure she doesn't use hand sanitizers. Lotions are usually not helpful b/c they are too thin and many have alcohol in them.

    Try a hand cream, not lotion. Cocao butter is good. Shea butter is good.

    The main thing is to drink a lot more water.
     
  4. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Thanks for your input Happyfeet. I drink a TON of water... sometimes I feel like I'm going to float away... haven't tried the humidifier that socoken suggested though... that may be a good idea!
     
  5. Rubenesque

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    I have mild eczema and very sensitive, dry skin. I was given a tip that is really great.

    get a largish square of muslin, put some oatmeal in the centre and tie it up into a bag. Hang it from your tap, so that when you're running a bath the water runs through the oatmeal.

    It really soothes dry skin.
     
  6. happyfeet

    happyfeet New Member

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    If the humidifier presents issues, try a vaporizer. Humidifiers make me cold in the winter, but vaporizers release warm air, so that helps me.

    Good luck! Do you think your soap might be too drying?
     
  7. IntoxicatingToxin

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    I thought of that too, happyfeet. It's definitely a possibility! I just use regular ole soap... nothing special. And thanks, UKBBW... that sounds like a good plan too!
     
  8. Yorkie

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    I get dry skin in cold weather and the only effective solution I've found is vaseline.I asked my doctor once as well and vaseline was the only thing he suggested so it looks like we're stuck with it! :rolleyes:
     
  9. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Vaseline, definitely does wonders, that's for sure! But I always feel so... greasy afterwards. And my friend Mat told me vaseline is bad for latex? I told him I didn't plan on having any latex on my legs, but oh well.
     
  10. Chrysalis

    Chrysalis New Member

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    Yes!!! Dry skin has plagued me for my entire adult life.

    Things that have helped:

    1) Consume healthy fats. I take flaxseed oil twice a day and try to get olive oil in recipes when I can.

    2) Stop using soap!!! It is terribly drying to the skin. Soap may be necessary to clean your anal-genital area, but for the rest of your body, use a soap-free body wash. In addition, with skin as dry as yours, I would recommend moisturizing in the shower after washing. You can put on a light layer of baby oil, rinse off the excess, and pat your skin dry with a towel (don't rub). It will help.

    3) Moisturize immediately after every shower. Most commercial scented lotions do not contain enough moisturizer to be effective. A few high-end products I indulge in occasionally are from Origins: Ginger Souffle', Calm to Your Senses Lavender and Vanilla Body Souffle', or...Cocoa Therapy Body Butter (OMG it's almost orgasmic!). For economical everyday use, I prefer Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion.

    4) Avoid hot baths (I know, I know.) If you must take a hot bath for relaxation, use bath oil, not bubble bath (which is soap) or bath salts (which is drying). And don't skimp on the oil. Just remember watch your step when you shower the next morning...:tongue:

    Dry skin runs in my family, and I live in a dry climate, so you have my sympathy and I hope you find relief. :smile:
     
  11. karmen

    karmen New Member

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    I googled the following information. I used the search terms "dry skin treatment". I hope the following information helps you.



    Successful treatment is accomplished by identifying exacerbating factors and changing bathing habits. Liberal use of moisturizers and occasionally a non-steroid anti-inflammatory cream or cortisone preparation may be necessary to decrease the skin irritation and inflammation before the healing process can take place.

    Recommendations:

    Bathing: Take brief lukewarm showers instead of baths. Do not shower more than once a day. Hot water, long showers and baths rid the skin of its natural protective oils. If you must take a bath, a lukewarm tub-bath is acceptable, particularly if you put bath oil in the water. Remember, a quick cool shower, without soap, is preferable to a long hot soapy one.

    Cleansing: Deodorant soaps and detergents remove the natural skin- protective oils, leaving the skin dry and irritated. Clear water alone will remove accumulated dust, sweat and grime. If cleansing is necessary, use a mild moisturizing or glycerin soap. Use soap only in the odor-bearing areas, such as under the arms and in the groin area.
    Soap must be thoroughly rinsed from these areas as this too can cause irritation. Finally, avoid scrubbing with a washcloth or loofah; this will remove the natural protective oils and irritate the skin.

    Lubrication: Immediately after towel drying, while the skin is still damp, apply moisturizers. Ideally, moisturizers should be applied twice daily. If a rash is present, a topical non-steroid anti-inflammatory cream or cortisone preparation is used before the moisturizing cream or lotion. Generally speaking, the thicker the moisturizer, the more effective it is for severely dry skin. Moisturizing creams or lotions are preferred over oils. Lastly, avoid moisturizers with strong perfume smells, as this can be a source of irritation for many people.

    Additional tips:
    1. Avoid bubble baths
    2. Do not allow the furnace or car heater to blow directly onto your skin. The hot, dry air can make your condition worse.
    3. If you live in a dry climate, consider a humidifier or vaporizer in the bedroom. If you have baseboard heating, try a large pan of water next to your bed.
    4. Avoid applications of alcohol, astringents, drying lotions or powders. They can be overly drying.
    5. Avoid hot tubs or spas. The hot chlorinated water will strip every bit of natural oil from your skin. It may be soothing at the time, but can make the symptoms worse later.
    Successful treatment of dry skin includes a thorough understanding of the causes and appropriate treatments. If your skin does not clear with conservative measures, consult your dermatologist.
     
  12. IntoxicatingToxin

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    Wow, you guys! Thanks for the tips. :) You're awesome!
     
  13. jakeatolla

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    I' m an Industrial Electrician and my hands for the last two years at least,
    have been so dry they crack and bleed frequently. I can't wear gloves
    most of the time, and not working will help.(But this won't pay the bills.)
    I drink a lot of water and use not scented moisturizers of all walks, and
    nothing seems to help.
    A friend's daughter told me to put vaseline on my hands over night, and wear latex or rubber gloves. Apparently it works, but I've yet to try it.
    So far I just live with it. Keeping my hands out of water helps,
    but when you work in a setting like I do, your hands get pretty dirty and
    I have to clean them three or four times a shift.

    I have heard of a product from the Dairy Farming industry called
    Bag Balm, which was developed to keep a cow's udder from drying out
    and cracking. Its suppost to work really good, but its greasy as hell from
    what I've heard. Trouble is, I don't live near any dairy farming communities.
    So If anyone knows where to buy this product, I'd be very greatfull.
     
  14. IntoxicatingToxin

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    The Original Bag Balm

    There's the link for their site. And the horseshoe stuff is good too. They're right about it being greasy though! I only use it on my elbows and sometimes my knees... just the really rough areas. I think it would be a good idea for you to use the vaseline treatment!
     
  15. chazscg

    chazscg New Member

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    Bag Balm is sold in most pharmacies or drugstores here in Michigan. I have the same problem with dry skin, but with my feet cracking open in the winter. What I do is put a ton of vaseline on, wrap them in saran wrap, and then put a pair of socks on and go to bed. I only have to do this about once a week. I also use glycerin soap instead of regular soap. For the rest of my body, I do the baby oil pat down that was mentioned earlier. On my face I use a product called Amlactin XL because baby oil is too greasy on the face. Hope this helps. I agree about bag balm being a little too greasy and it has a funny odor to it too.
     
  16. Rikter8

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    Thats odd... Generally Humidifiers make the house Feel Warmer than cold.

    I know that when I recently installed my Humidifier on my furnace, that I could adjust my temperature a bit as 68F felt warmer than usual.

    C
     
  17. jakeatolla

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    My elderly Mother went out and got some Goat's milk soap, that is loaded
    with glycerin as well. She swears by it.
     
  18. Gillette

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    I have trouble with dry skin, too. What I've found to help is shorter, cooler showers and moisturizing before toweling off as was mentioned earlier.

    For lotions themselves I've found avon's Silicone Glove is fairly good as are Urea10 or Urea20. The best I've used was recommended by a dermatologist. It's a eucerin/glycerine emulsion that any pharmacist will have behind the counter, but you don't need a prescription for it. Best applied while you're still dripping wet.
     
  19. jakeatolla

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    I won a bottle of Urea 10 years ago and liked it because it
    was non greasy, no odor and hypo allergenic.
    Its great stuff, but expensive.
     
  20. Gillette

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    I have to ask. What kind of contest did you win a bottle of lotion for?
    Raffle maybe?
     
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