UK dismantling healthcare system?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by D_Adam_Baldwon, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. D_Adam_Baldwon

    D_Adam_Baldwon Account Disabled

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    I've read a few articles online that the U.K. is dismantling it's healthcare system (NHS). It appears that they're not totally doing away with the NHS, but they seem to want to privatize some aspects of the healthcare system, sort of like a hybrid between privatized and nationalized healthcare, from what I can gather. Can someone from the U.K. please explain if this is actually true? If so, why? Is the NHS going bankrupt?
     
  2. BikerBear

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    I am an American living in the UK, and I can assure you that the NHS is NOT going bankrupt! I just love the press who can not get their facts correct.... :cool:

    I read an article that my parents sent to me last week, about the "Liberal Socialist Party".... HA!!! There's no such thing! It's called the "Liberal Democratic Party" and is currently in power today under a coalition government (shared powers between Conservative Party & LibDem's).

    Glad you checked out whether this rubbish is true, tho!


    Cheers!
     
  3. Jason43

    Jason43 New Member

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    Officially the incoming government have 'ringfenced' the NHS budget.
    But being a predominantly Conservative goverernment I for one will not be surprised if they try to cut the NHS budget.
    The Conservatives have ALWAYS been a political party that knows the price of everything and the VALUE on nothing.
    The coalition is already looking shaky and small cracks are beginning to show after just two months in power, the Liberal vote has fell away sharply according to some polls and when this transpires into actual votes at local elections the divisions will become much wider.
    I will be absolutely gobsmacked if it goes full term ( 5 years ), it wont last.
     
  4. D_Andreas Sukov

    D_Andreas Sukov Account Disabled

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    Staff are being cut, and there is a pressure on people in the NHS to cut spending.

    This translates into people in management that spend their days deciding on eggshell white or eggshell creme window blinds and and entertain wealthy contractors keep their hundred-of-thousands pound wages, whilst the Nurse, the Doctor and other frontline workers lose thier jobs, their wages, their pension and thier lifestyles.

    Dont worry though, Big society will come along and save the day.
     
  5. Jason

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    The NHS is funded by the state - it can't really go bust unless the state goes bust.

    There have been changes to way that the NHS has been run at very frequent intervals since it was started - and yes, the new government is making another round of changes. Yet fundmentally it remains unchanged - a state-funded system free at the point of delivery, and now with a ring-fenced budget, so it won't be cut in the austerity programme.

    A key issue with a state health system is the way in which access to services is distributed. The demand for services is of course in excess to what could ever be provided. A pure market system regulates access through the market, ie through payment. A non-market system regulates access through waiting lists. The NHS has recently used waiting lists tempered with performance standards as a quality control - and has been supported by enormous increases in its total budget. The incoming government is looking more towards giving responsibility for funding decisions to GPs (family doctors) and others on the front line. This isn't a public-private hybrid but rather remains wholly public - just a different funding distribution model.
     
  6. Bbucko

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    This sounds like most other "austerity measures" and "cost containment strategies" one hears so much about.
     
  7. dandelion

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    well public sector pensions are in the firing line now since many private sector pensions have already been drastically cut back. By comparison, the state organised ones now look very generous. Every time a new measure is introduced to improve 'performance' of the NHS, one consquence is the hiring of more office staff to administer it. people are starting to think the ratio of managers to workers is getting top heavy. Although budgets have been 'ring fenced', medical inflation is significantly higher than ordinary inflation, so the budget is set to shrink in comparison to the costs of available treatments over the next few years. Sensible health authorities are already reconsidering their priorities and getting ready to cut less important services to make way for new ones. Over the last few years new services have been funded with new money, so even living on a fixed budget will be a shock for the NHS.

    But this cycle of boom and then retrenchment is pretty normal for the NHS over the years.
     
  8. D_Relentless Original

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    My hospital closes wards on a daily basis, patients are moved from ward to ward when these wards close for weeks at a time. Agency nurses, some who do not have good communication skills are mostly on the wards.

    A family member of mine had an operation at 9am and was discharged at 4pm on the same day, readmitted the next day due to complications and a infection picked up from the hospital, had to wait 4 hours in ER to see a doctor and then a further 9 hours sat in a ward corridor waiting for a bed because so many wards had been closed due to staffing shortages.

    The basic care is no longer there any more, cleanliness and medication times are a thing of the past. When i complained to a nurse about the care my relative was getting, she repeated everyone of my words back to me, trying to understand what i was saying and informed me i should be thankfull we have an NHS in her country they do not.

    Its a bad show, but the contracted nurses work very hard under pitiful conditions, makes you wonder how Cameron and his puppet would cope as a patient.
     
  9. Jason

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    Cameron knows lots about the NHS. His terminally ill son was treated by the NHS and he had the experience of long nights at his local hospital. He really knows what it is like.

    Really sorry to hear of your bad experience Tardis. I've seen bad experiences with two relatives, and they've left me feeling pretty raw. Cameron hasn't caused these problems and I'm prepared to believe he has the motivation to do something about them.

    Sometime soon the UK needs a "proper" conversation about the UK health provision. We seem to have a model that can't grow properly to meet new challenges. There has to be something better. But I rather think no politician wants to talk about it as the headline would be pretty much the title of this thread "politician X dismantling the NHS".
     
  10. DaveyR

    DaveyR Retired Moderator
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    My recent experience with the NHS could not be further removed from your own. A close family member who was very seriously ill could not have had better treatment. The hospital was immaculate and modern. At one point we did not expect her to survive the night. She is home now and will need a lot of treatment in the future including a liver transplant but we cannot rate her treatment highly enough.

    I think our two experiences show that treatment in the UK is very much a lottery depending on which NHS trust your come under. At it's best the NHS is brilliant and that same standard should be there for all.
     
  11. B_crackoff

    B_crackoff New Member

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    Here's this from 2007.

    The average GP now earns £118,000 a year. This is a staggering rise of 63% in three years. And it gets better: instead of having to care for patients all day, every day they are now just responsible during office hours (weekdays only). Is it any wonder the NHS is unwell?
    Sick pay: Massive rise in GPs' salaries worsens NHS cash crisis - Health News, Health & Families - The Independent

    Add to this the numbers of GPs who remained practicising instead of retiring, for another year, & in doing so got a pension bump of 40-60%(!!!) (£40k pension became £60k on average) , & you realise the profligacy & mismanagement of the last Government was universal.

    It's not like they'd put any money away for it. A GP retiring at 65 (average death age at 65 is 89) suddenly found an extra HALF A MILLION POUNDS in their pension pot - which is why a thousand deferred for a year.

    I hope I can retire when some asshole's throwing away other people's money.
     
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