What is in a name?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by naughty, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. naughty

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    Hi,

    An earlier thread prompted this question. Has anyone notice that certain first names and first names ending in particular suffixes tend to break down according to generation, ethnicity, region? For instance, lets take the name Hazel. First and foremost unless someone is named after a family member the name went out of fashion in the 30's and 40's. Depending upon the ethnicity and region it might be spelled Hazel or Hazelle but pronounced Ha-zel .Or it might have a variation such as Hazelene or Hazeletta. Or you might hear a middle name of Mae or belle with a black woman of a certain age while Sue or jean might serve a white female of the same generation... Has anyone else noticed this?
     
  2. B_big dirigible

    B_big dirigible New Member

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    Mainly a general shift from the -y suffix to -i in girl's names.

    It was reported to me a decade or two ago that a young lady had been spotted in an American supermarket with a name (on a name tag) of "Rubbi", which my informant hoped was just a misspelling of a modified form of the old favorite "Ruby". "Rubi" might make sense, but "Rubbi"?
     
  3. losangelestim

    losangelestim Member

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    i feel sorry for folks with mispelled "personalized" names. the name no longer carries meaning or connotation beyond the individual named. i love womens names that are considered old-fashioned like agnes and hazel and rose. i don't associate them with any ethnicity. but i'm a white guy so what do i know.
     
  4. prepstudinsc

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    Don't forget names like Quantrell...

    It is funny to watch how names change with generations.
     
  5. snoozan

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    In the book Freakonomics, the authors took a fascinating look at the popularity of names over the years and within social groups. It was a really cool read.

    I really really like old lady names. If I ever have a daughter, I will name her Betty or Evelyn (which was originally a male name). They are also family names (my grandma and the husband's grandma). I named my son something relatively trendy-- it goes with the trend of naming kids, especially boys, with somewhat common last names. His first and middle names are also family names, however-- my grandmother's family name and my mother-in-law's family name.

    My name, Susan, is about 10-15 years at least too late to be popular anymore, so while I meet a lot of women with my name that are 15+ years older than I am, I meet very few that are my age. I actually kind of like having an out-of-fashion name. It's almost... retro!

    With all that said, I can't count on my hands and toes the number of Jennifers I know that are in my age group. Everywhere I go I meet at least one Jen, Jenn, Jenny, or Jennifer. I can't keep them all straight. I also can't keep straight all the Roberts and Michaels and Davids and Christophers and Bryans I know.

    The one name I find to be absolutely hideous all around for a male is Todd. Which is my husband's name. I still hate it. I just call him "honey" a lot.

    Naming trends are fascinating to me. This site is really really freakin cool:

    The Baby Name Wizard: NameVoyager
     
  6. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    Actual given names from the Pecker family tree (19th century:)

    Cynara
    Jerusha
    Ruzillah
    Mireio
    Mahitabel

    Alpheus
    Gladstone
    Villard
    Sharpes

    Our 20th century families stayed mainly with common biblical names but our 21st century generation is more trendy:

    Jen
    Ashton
    Brandon

    Colton
    Tanner
    Connor
    Tristan
     
  7. avalonjim

    avalonjim Member

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    VERY cool site, unfortunately the names I wanted to name my sons, if I ever had any are really popular. I always liked Seth and Jakob (German for James.. too many Jim's in my family as it is and yes I would pronounce it Yah-kohb) Its funny, my sister wanted both of those names for her son, but her husband said they made the kid sound too Jewish. We all just looked at him like he was a lunatic. Ethnic and biblical yes, but with a mindset like that , it is no wonder my children will NEVER set foot in a Catholic school. He is an idiot. Other than that I am drawn to ethnic names. All women in my family for the most part are named after Mary in some way, and I always liked Marianne (pronounced Mar-e-Ahn-ay), which along with Theresa, Barbara (again pronounced Tehr-A-sah and bar-bar-AH), Lisabett (Liesl or Liesi) and Ava, all follow along with my father's good Danube Swabian upbringing, and echo the names of my ancestors. In addition to Seth and Jakob, I also always liked the names Sepp, Franz, August and Ferdinand, although the family tradition of always having a Ferdl (fair-tell), Franzl, and Liesl (Lee-sell) running around may not translate well to American tounges.
     
  8. naughty

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    I love the name Seth. I too wanted to name one of my children after a favorite uncle, Seth. Though he was not Jewish, at one point, actually was a cantor! LOL! Other favorite first family names Graham and Malcolm. Most of the female names of that same generation were rather unfortunate. It was interesting that I had to aunts with names that meant the same thing but in different languages. Margaret and Maisie.I was long ago trumped by another cousin who named her son Christian which was another favorite...













     
  9. naughty

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    I LOVE these names. How lucky you are to be able to reach back to the 19th century and pull them up from the long ago past...
     
  10. HazelGod

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    Though we have no children yet, my wife nevertheless loves to play the "name game" all the time.

    Her current projected given names are Scarlett and Jackson.


    What I find amusing in recent trends is the propensity of certain cultures to prefix, seemingly at random, a La- or De- to contemporary given names. I'm noticing this a lot in professional athletes: LaDanian, LaBrandon, DeShaun, etc.
     
  11. prepstudinsc

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    Ke'Shawn is also a good name.


     
  12. naughty

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    You have lost your natural born mind! LOL!
     
  13. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    You've got me started now but I can't list them all....

    18th century first names (on my mom's side:)

    Hannah
    Charity
    Anastacia
    Susannah

    Kenyon
    Burr
    Valentine
    Watson
    Driessen
    Harmon

    (father's side:)

    Della
    Zeoltus
    Olive
    Polly
    Fanny

    Ensel
    Chambers
    Jackson
    Reeves
    Griffin

    17th century (maternal:)

    Betsy
    Ester
    Wihelmina
    Marcy

    Elmer
    Edwin
    Alanson
    Malford
    Enos

    16th century (maternal:)

    Eleanor
    Alice
    Judith
    Isabella

    Gerard
    Micajah
    Johannes

    15th, 14th, 13th centuries (maternal:)

    Here it's all Johns, Williams, Annes, Elizabeths, etc.

    12th century (maternal:)

    Rohesia
    Muriel
    Anabel

    Hugh
    Giles
    Galfidius
    Almaric

    11th century (maternal:)

    Thurston
    Alix
    Talves
    Montgomery
    Amaury
    Raoul

    (Thanks to my sister, a genealogist supreme!)
     
  14. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    I don't think that lady was calling you Ke'Shawn, Monty.

    She took one look at you and said, "Pshaw!"
     
  15. naughty

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    Wow that is quite a list!
     
  16. Spoogesicle

    Spoogesicle New Member

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    You forgot about the "prefix" Sha-. While I found LaBrenda and DeAngela rather amusing, ShaBarbara had me laughing out loud. (Yes, that's someone's actual first name!) Mispronounced first names are entertaining, too. One woman was quite upset for giving her name, Juanita, a modified Spanish pronunciation. She told me in no uncertain terms that her name was pronounced "Joo-uh-NYE-duh." Well, how was I to know? I read 'em as I see 'em.
     
  17. scanjock8

    scanjock8 Active Member

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    I am so over the recent crop of popular baby names trying to be stylishly traditional or unique--they often just sound affected to me.
     
  18. naughty

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    Well what starts out as an attempt at being unique usually and ultimately ends up being cliche...
     
  19. prepstudinsc

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    Wowwwwwww!!!!!!!
     
  20. Pecker

    Pecker Retired Moderator
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    My freshman lit. professor in college used to say "Don Joo-ahn" instead of "Don Juan."
     
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