What is this music?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by jjsjr, Mar 26, 2009.

  1. jjsjr

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  2. pym

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    #2 pym, Mar 26, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2009
  3. Enid

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    Try somafm.com

    secret agent station

    or groove salad
     
  4. MarkLondon

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    #4 MarkLondon, Mar 26, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2009
  5. dreamer20

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  6. tripod

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    The music is actually VERY good and was composed by Michael Giacchino who had previously done a bunch of video game scores and had done some work for J.J. Abrams, most notably in his series Alias (which Giacchino scored). Pixar, who had been relying on brothers Randy and Thomas Newman for all of their previous soundtracks had originally wanted to get John Barry (scored the original Bond films) for the Incredibles. John Barry was none to excited about scoring an animated movie and was unltimately not interested.

    The score is reminiscent of the spy genre which used low key German Expressionist cinematography and jazz scores to create a moody landscape that provided a specific environment for the tales of espionage and intrigue to unfold.

    The soundtrack owes more to Lalo Schifrin and Henry Mancini then John Barry. the soundtrack is also quite reminiscent of the "Space Lounge" music that was marketed to the bachelors of the 50's and 60's. names like Martin Denny, Les Baxter and Esquivel. The genre would latercome to be known as "Exotica" which was coined from Denny's landmark 1957 album of the same name. The Polynesian and "Tiki" flavors were introduced as the genre pushed on along with a growing African and South American influence.

    You can't go wrong with Les Baxter and Martin Denny though. Lalo Schifrin composed a soundtrack to a French movie called "The Cat" that features the great Jimmy Smith on organ. It is cinematic jazz at it's best. I'll rip and upload some albums later on this evening and post the links for ya.
     
  7. jjsjr

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    Yeah, its similar to "Windmills of your Mind" also by Dusty,
    you've all been really informative.

    Its got a certain vibe that I like, so I've just been trying to pinpoint what to search for online. Its like 60's bossanova.
     
  8. MarkLondon

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    Mmmm, can't wait. Sounds like you know your stuff.
     
  9. MarkLondon

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  10. HellsKitchenmanNYC

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    I think I love you!
     
  11. tripod

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    :kiss:

    Well, you are gonna really like these links then!!!! :biggrin1:

    First off are vinyl rips of various Martin Denny albums for a sweet mix of pieces throughout his career. It was a rather hurried ripping process with none of the songs getting properly faded out though. :(

    the tunes do however, sound fantastic!

    Martin Denny Vinyl Mix
    MEGAUPLOAD - The leading online storage and file delivery service

    Next up is the big band collaboration between organist Jimmy Smith and Argentinian arranger, conductor and composer extraordinaire Lalo Schifrin. This record features songs from 2 film scores ("The Cat" from the film Joy House, was a Grammy win for Lalo), a bit of big-band style orchestrations, and lots of steamy blues.

    Here's a review of the album:
    Jimmy at this point was at the top of his game and where no could touch him (or has). Lalo's big band arrangements had more drama and punch than anything that Jimmy had ever played over. In fact, the band is so incredibly powerful that it nearly outshines Jimmy, a near impossible feat. Time and again on this album the whole ensemble goes from quiet depths to outright blasting in seconds. It's a sound you can't be ready for and that you should be very careful around. It's easy to imagine how many speakers have been killed by this incredible LP. And then there is The Cat. The second most famous tune in Jimmy's catalogue. Words… just fail. It swings. It blasts. There is no way to sit still through it. It is the king of swinging '60s organ jazz.

    The Cat... The Incredible Jimmy Smith

    MEGAUPLOAD - The leading online storage and file delivery service

    And last but not least, some Les Baxter to round the genre all out. Now, Les Baxter was the composer of many of Martin Denny's most popular songs... so when you hear a good deal of Martin Denny, you are also hearing the genius and influence of Les Baxter. Here are a couple of Les Baxter albums that showcase the more explorative side of "exotica". The album's are Les Baxter's African Jazz and The Lost Episode. African Jazz is pretty much self explanatory and the Lost Episode is an excerpt of his 1961 television episode (it's only a bit over 20 minutes in run time).

    Les Baxter's African Jazz and The Lost Episode

    MEGAUPLOAD - The leading online storage and file delivery service

    Everything is ripped @320kbps and all tags have been included.

    My Dad has a shitload of this stuff on vinyl... I am gonna bug him to try and find where all of these albums are (might be a bit difficult,,, he doesn't really have an organizing system! lol!). I'll try and touch back whenever I run across some more
     
    #11 tripod, Mar 27, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2009
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