When are you considered Bi-Racial or half Black?

Discussion in 'Relationships, Discrimination, and Jealousy' started by jimmyboi, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. jimmyboi

    jimmyboi New Member

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    The term half black/ half white or bi-racial makes no sense cuz technically every African-American is mixed.


    For example. Halle Barey is considered half black, half white, cause she has one black parent and one white parent.

    Beyonce is considered Black, cause she has two "black" parents.

    Tiger'mom is full Asian, yet the man is considered black. Same goes for Kimora Lee Simmons, Amerie etc....

    Lets say two half black/ white ppl marry each other and get a kid, then the kid will be black.

    Pls clarify this shit.
     
  2. str82fcuk

    str82fcuk Member

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    it all depnds on who's doing the considering ...
    there is never any clarity on this shit
    might as well give up now
     
  3. AquaEyes11010

    AquaEyes11010 Active Member

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    Another reason to dismiss the "race" notion. The whole grading-system of "how black are you?" harkens back to the days of slavery in this country. Being "black" meant one of/or two things: 1) you appeared overwhelmingly of African descent, and/or 2) both your parents appeared overwhelmingly of African descent. In any case, it marked you as "less-than-white."

    As white people impregnated their black slaves, a new term developed: mulatto. Still perceived as black, the term meant a different "class" of black. Most house-slaves were mulatto, probably because their white owners were often blood relations, and felt it was kinder to keep them near and working less physically taxing jobs. But mulattos were still "black" because it was felt that "just a drop of black blood" made you "less" than whites.

    Other terms developed as a means of quantifying the amount of "black blood" a person had so as to further distance "superior whites" from everyone else, such as quadroon (one black grandparent) and octoroon (one black great-grandparent). Though clearly of mostly white heritage, these people were still seen as being less of a human than someone who was "pure white" though of higher class than someone who was of any higher percentage black. Because of the origins of these terms, they are considered offensive by many black people today who understand their true meanings.

    Many mostly-white "free people of color" from New Orleans succeeded in passing themselves off as "pure white" and became absorbed into the "pure white" population. As a result, while you are correct in saying that most "black" people in the US are really mixed, so are many "white" people here, if they have generations in this country going back far enough.
    ;-)
     
  4. jimmyboi

    jimmyboi New Member

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    ight..u seem to know much about RACE...
    my question to you..


    1/ Do you consider Don Cheadle as an African/American u could confuse as a PURE AFRICAN...

    2/ Whats the percentages of African American who are pre/domniatly of African admixture or darksin
     
  5. Principessa

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    Haha, you aren't from here are you honey? :redface:

    Here's the deal. Way back when slavery was the law of the land a problem arose. Overseers and slaveowners had a most annoying tendency to rape the black female slaves and this often produced children who had a lighter skintone than the mother but a darker skintone than the father. They also often inherited the fathers blue, green, or gray eyes.

    If you are even 1/16th black you are black. 130 years ago this meant you could be sold as a slave, beaten, hanged, etc.




    That is also correct. You understand everything perfectly. So whats the problem? :biggrin1:
     
  6. Male Bonding etc

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    So, yes, let's move on to judging by the content of character and not the color of the skin... or the parents' skin... or the great, great grandmother's skin...
     
  7. B_Italian1

    B_Italian1 New Member

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    I always used the word "mulatto" when referring to people who were part black and part white. That's the word that was used when I was growing up. A few years ago I said mulatto and was told by a 100% white person,
    "YOU'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO USE THAT WORD. ANYONE WITH 1% BLACK IN THEM IS BLACK!" You would have though that I committed a crime.

    Tiger Woods once called himself Cablinasian: Caucasian, Black, Indian, and Asian. He is 1/4 black, 1/4 Thai, 1/4 Chinese, 1/8 white and 1/8 American Indian.

    Never heard that. I know a man whose great grandfather was black and he doesn't consider himself black. I asked him what he puts on forms and he said he checks off Caucasian.
     
  8. AquaEyes11010

    AquaEyes11010 Active Member

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    To answer you (sorta):

    1) I don't know who Don Cheadle is, but even if I did, what does a "pure African" look like? There are many peoples of Africa that look very different from one another. Look up some of the following peoples of Africa and come back to me describing what a "pure African" looks like: San/Bushmen, Ngoni, Zulu, Nubian, Berber, Hehe, Kounta, Safwa, Pigmy, Tutsi, Massai and many others. Since most of the people brought here from Africa during the slave trade originated in West Africa, Americans who don't know any other African people assume that Africa is full of people who look just like the black people here, and this isn't true.

    2) Again, you're asking a question that's not clearly answerable. There are many "pure Africans" who are paler than many "half-blacks" in this country because that is how their people appear. Obviously, if someone is "half-black" and the black parent is very dark, that person will be darker than someone who is "half-black" whose black parent is paler.

    Like I said in several other posts, people are different everywhere you go, gradually fading from one look into the next in all directions. Africa is a huge continent full of lots of different groups of people that are as distinctly different looking from eachother -- if not more so -- than are the different groups of people on the continent of Europe. So, if you have a picture of what a "pure African" looks like, tell me what a "pure European" looks like.
    :)
     
  9. Principessa

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    In the United states of America if you are even 1/16th black, you black and are entitled to a life of strife, stress, and hard work. Why is that so hard to comprehend?:confused::biggrin1:

    Okay, you are getting into a very, touchy area here and I don't think you realize it. What exactly is it that you are trying to determine? :suspect::thinking:One need not have dark skin to be considered Black by law in America. There used to be something called the brown paper bag test. If you were darker than a brown paper bag you were dark skinned. I have first cousins who are much lighter that Halle Berry or Beyonce. Some of them have actually chosen to pass at various times in their lives. To pass when speaking in racial terms means passing for white.
     
  10. Principessa

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    And if you will recall he caught major shit in the media from all concerned parties.


     
  11. jimmyboi

    jimmyboi New Member

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    im just interested in african/american race studies. Because they come in all shades.

    As for Don Cheadle, like if he walk in Africa u would think he´s local.
    But if for example Shemar Moore or Vanessa Williams would go to Africa, you know they aint local.
     
  12. AquaEyes11010

    AquaEyes11010 Active Member

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    You're assuming that when you travel, you're perceived as being local based on skin-tone. This isn't true. Try traveling abroad to Europe sometime, and I'm sure you'll be immediately spotted as being "non-local."

    I'm remembering when I had a coworker from South Africa. She was born there, her parents were born there, and three of her grandparents were born there (that's as far back as she knew). She had blond hair and blue eyes. So is she more "African" than a black person whose ancestors have been in the US for five generations? And she was clearly perceived to be "non-local." Hmmm.....

    What is the big concern about classifying people? Once you start, you'll find that you have an ever-growing list of "races" because there really are none, just one human race that has a lot of variety.

    So getting back to my question before, what does a "pure European" look like?
    ;-)
     
  13. Principessa

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    Jimmyboi, I am trying so hard to remain cool but you are kinda starting to piss me off. By my familys standards I am medium not dark skinned. The first time someone called me dark was about 3 years ago and I was horrified. Especially since the woman who did so was blacker than a thousand midnights. WTF?!?! :mad::confused:

    Wrong again oh misguided one.
     
  14. naughty

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    Workin' up a good pot of mad!

    Do not even get started with that. These color threads embarass me when I think about how messed up so many people of color are in terms of defining themselves by their exteriors. I would love for all to live MLK's dream but as long as there is one person Black white or other there to remind one of who THEY think you are we stay at square one.
     
  15. patrick222

    patrick222 Member

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    Get with the program , one race , Human
     
  16. Tru_african

    Tru_african New Member

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    I dont think there's such a thing as half-black,,, my son is black despite being born off an interracial relationship.
     
  17. ~quicksilver~

    ~quicksilver~ New Member

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    You know what, in this day and age it really shouldn't matter. And for most people my age (25) it really doesn't as we are so used to and exposed to different races, cultures and religions than we ever were before. I come from an interracial marriage. I am exactly half black/half white. I tend not to classify myself as anything other than "me". I also spend a lot of time ticking the "other" box on forms. I will say for the most part I identify with and am more in touch with my black culture and heritage. This is because I was brought up with my Mum's family, although my Dad was around he was from abroad so had no close contact with my white relatives.

    The thing maybe this man is trying to get at is perception (in a round about slightly offensive way!) I have been told that I do not particularly look "black" or act "black" etc. WHAT DOES BLACK LOOK LIKE OR ACT LIKE!!! I usually tell these people that obvioulsy their perceptions of "blackness" are very limited and perhaps if they were more familiar with black history and culture they would realise that people from black heritage come in all colours, shapes, sizes and socio-economic backrounds.

    A lot of how mixed race people identify themselves has to do with where/how they grew up. It is hard if you don't easily fit into a box or pigeon hole and you have to make it up for yourself. Most of the time you will align yourself as a child with whoever will accept you. I would say that most people who are mixed race identify themselves as black (ie Halle Berry etc) because the black community usually doesn't have a problem in accepting or claiming a mixed race person as one of their own. I grew up in a black family environment in a predominantly black area. When I am with a bunch of black people there is no issue whatsover. They tend to accept me as I am and get on with it. When I am with a group of white people I get a lot of "Where are you from?" "What are you?" etc etc. Most of it is curiosity and unawareness but it proves what I am trying to say. A mixed race person may not be black, but will usually be accepted by the black community. I think with the white community it isn't about what you actually ARE, but what you LOOK like. Its not about whether you are black or not, it is about the fact that your are clearly not "white".
     
  18. D_Gunther Snotpole

    D_Gunther Snotpole Account Disabled

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    I wonder, AquaEyes, if this is really true.
    Depends on how the dice falls.
    The dark parent probably has genes that, in various combinations, could produce a relatively light-skinned child.
    That said, you are a very interesting and conspicuously intelligent poster.
     
  19. sargon20

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    Indeed. There is something about humans that they want desperately to be able to simply look at something rather than think about something and come to all kind of conclusions quickly.
     
  20. Osiris

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    It's this type of thread the proves the point that racism is alive and well in the world. I am a Black American, PERIOD! It pisses me off when people try to pidgeon whole black people into the "what box do you check on a job app" thing. And it pisses me off twice as much when black people do it. The sooner everyone accepts that we all bleed the same red blood, eat the same food, and breath the same air, the better off humanity will be.

    I couldn't agree with you more. The more these posts go on, everyone looks like they have IQs equal to or lower than a bowl of bean dip. No one ever "wins" these debates because no one is going to share the same point of reference. So why even try to ask for explanation? You aren't going to accept it in any form because the belief is already formed. As has been said before, it is dependant on who is doing the labeling.

    Thank you Patrick. Unfortunately you are a rarity on this issue.
     
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