why change Heath insurances?

Discussion in 'Politics' started by B_Marius567, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. B_Marius567

    B_Marius567 New Member

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    I have Heath care insurances and I happy with it so why do Obama and McCain want to change it???
    what it wrong with the Heath insurances we have now?

    I hope they do not change any thing!!!!
     
  2. VeeP

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    Maybe they'll add coverage for poor spelling? :tongue:
     
  3. chiefone4u

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    Maybe add double coverage for poor Grammar?:rolleyes:
     
  4. D_Davy_Downspout

    D_Davy_Downspout Account Disabled

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    1) Because 45 million people have no coverage whatsoever
    2) Because many people are one major injury/disease away from not being able to afford their insurance
    3) Because people get dropped when they actually need the insurance by companies who are not happy about paying out to their customers
    4) Because the way private health insurance works is by giving the minimum amount of care for the maximum price. It's their duty to shareholders to do so.
    5) Because the current system is the most expensive in the world(both out of pocket, and in taxes, per capita), and one of the worst in the world in terms of results, by almost every metric


    So many other reasons, but that's a start.
     
  5. Principessa

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    First of all I'm glad your you have Heath insurance. I too love Heath Bars but it never ocurred to me to insure them. :lmao: :biggrin1:

    Second in addition to not being able to spell you're an F'ing moron if you don't understand the topic at hand. There are almost 46 million Americans without health insurance. In a country that is supposed to be great, this is a pathetic travesty of justice. :12:

    I'm glad you have insurance but for the 45.7 million Americans who don't have insurance they are but a minor illness away from death and bankruptcy. That is why everywhere they go Obama and McCain are asked what they will do about health care or rather the lack of it in this country.

    For the record, many of the uninsured are working adults. :eek: Many employers such as Wal-Mart will not hire employees to work full-time so that they don't have to give them benefits. Or some companies offer benefits which the employees pay for through automatic deductions from their pay check. These deductions can literally eat up a quarter of a persons paycheck. Leaving them an unwilling member of the legions of working poor in this country.



    Number of Uninsured Americans Drops to 45.7 Million!

    More children now covered by government-sponsored programs, Census Bureau reports


    Tuesday, August 26, 2008

    TUESDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans without health insurance dropped by more than 1 million people in 2007, the first annual decline in seven years, U.S. Census Bureau officials announced Tuesday.

    The drop was driven largely by an increase in the number of children getting health insurance through government-funded programs. "Both the percentage and number of people without health insurance decreased in 2007," David Johnson, chief of the Census Bureau's Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division, said during a morning teleconference.

    The percentage of Americans without health insurance was 15.3 percent in 2007, down from 15.8 percent in 2006. The number of uninsured dropped from 47 million in 2006 to 45.7 million in 2007, Johnson said.

    The number of people with health insurance increased from 249.8 million in 2006 to 253.4 million in 2007, according to the Census Bureau report: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007.

    The number of children with health insurance increased to 8.7 million in 2007, up from 8.1 million in 2006. The number of children living in poverty declined from 2006 to 2007; children living in poverty were more likely to be uninsured.

    "The number of children covered by government health insurance programs increased to 31 percent from 29.8 percent in 2006," Johnson said. "This is the main reason for the fall in the uninsured rates in children and for the fall in uninsured rates in the general population," he said.

    While the number of people with private health insurance did not change significantly between 2006 and 2007, the number of people covered by government health insurance such as Medicaid increased from 80.3 million in 2006 to 83 million in 2007.

    The number of people covered by private health insurance dropped slightly from 67.9 percent in 2006 to 67.5 percent in 2007. And, people covered by employer-based insurance dropped to 59.3 percent in 2007 from 59.7 percent in 2006, according to the report.

    People getting their health insurance through Medicaid increased from 38.3 million in 2006 to 39.6 million in 2007.

    Among whites, blacks and Hispanics, the number of uninsured dropped. For non-Hispanic whites, the number of uninsured declined from 10.8 percent to 2006 to 10.4 percent in 2007. Among blacks, the number of uninsured dipped from 20.5 percent in 2006 to 19.5 percent in 2007. For Hispanics, the number of uninsured fell from 34.1 percent in 2006 to 32.1 percent in 2007.

    Karen Davis, president of The Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that seeks to promote a high-performing health care system for all Americans, thinks that the drop in the number of uninsured supports the argument for government-sponsored health insurance programs.

    "This is really a bit of a surprise," Davis said. "But when you look at what's really going on, the number of uninsured dropped by 1.3 million, and the increase in coverage under Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) went up by 1.3 million," she said.

    This shows the importance of government-funded safety nets, she said.
    Davis noted that in Massachusetts, which has a government-sponsored health insurance program, the uninsured rate was 4.7 percent in 2007, compared with 25.5 percent in Texas, which does not have such a program. "You just see the difference the new Massachusetts health reform plan has made in improving coverage," she said.

    And though the number of uninsured has declined, there's much work to be done, Davis said. She said: "45.7 million people who are uninsured is still a major problem. There is no cause for celebration that we only have 45.7 million uninsured. There is still a very serious problem -- the most serious problem we have in the health sector."
     
    #5 Principessa, Oct 22, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2008
  6. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    One of the many problems with this issue is this - who pays for it? Malpractice insurance has ballooned to a level that GP's can't even survive. When you factor in their student loans, they are walking out of med school owing $250K to 400K out of the gate. The insurance companies have turned claims-collection into a wild goose chase. As is, if you have a medical problem, you are lucky to get 30 seconds with a doctor. The doctor's office is like a line at King's Island.

    Doctor's are turning into the new teachers. Important and underpaid. When its nationalized, the talent will exit the profession and promising students will steer away from medicine.

    What is your solution? Just saying "get people insured" sounds good, but its a complicated scenario.
     
  7. nitzaski

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    I tell you answer is NOT a National Health Service that we have here - it was all well and good when there was shorter life expectancy, less smoking, drinking & drug problems and less obesity.

    The NHS cannot cope with the increasing pressures and is completely underfunded - people wainting longer and longer for operations and consultancies. You can wait over a week just to see your own General Practitioner - which was almost unheard of just a few years ago. And the costs only rise every year.

    The trend that is rising in the UK is private medical insurance even though we all pay towards the NHS we have little confidence in it and must pay twice to protect ourselves.
     
  8. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    This is exactly what I'm afraid of - gov't fucking up yet another industry.
     
  9. nitzaski

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    And now they are nationalising the banks here - run for cover!
     
  10. B_starinvestor

    B_starinvestor New Member

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    Well, not exactly. They are offering banks the option of issuing preferred stock, with warrants (the right to buy common stock.) But the preferreds are really just an IOU to the gov't so that banks can untie themselves from the credit paralysis.

    In due time, healthy banks will be ex-gov't when the preferreds are sold to the private sector.

    The gov't is a parasitic disease in every private-sector endeavor in engages itself in. This one time, it was needed. Fortunately, the 'rescue plan' is structured in a way that they [gov't] will be removed and eradicated when the credit system is healthy.
     
  11. nitzaski

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    Agreed - 37 Billion pumped in to prop them up - I understand that this is needed and look forward the day when the preference shares have been fully repaid. Scrapping the fat cat bonuses pleased most though!
     
  12. D_Davy_Downspout

    D_Davy_Downspout Account Disabled

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    In France, for instance, the government pays for medschool for everyone who is accepted, and severely limits tort liability with legislation. Their system is considered one of the top in the world, far above the US.

    They pay less per capita than we do.

    There are many models available to us on how to do this correctly.
     
  13. D_Davy_Downspout

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    Oh sure, ....CDS's were about 900 billion in 2000, and about 63 trillion this year. Thanks to Phil Gramm's Commodities Future Modernization Act....the current crisis is almost entirely thanks to lack of government oversight, and you are somehow interpreting that to mean that government should be less involved in banking?
     
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