Why do British singers sing in an American accent?

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Mem, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. Mem

    Mem
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    The only British Singer who I know that doesn't is Billy Bragg. And there is a new young female singer who was at the Princess Diana benefit concert who sings in an almost Cockney accent.

    Does the American way of speaking sound "sing-songy" to foreign ears?

    Because I speak Spanish and there are some South or Central American people I have heard speaking spanish that have a strange pattern that sounds like a song when they speak. (I guess it's up and down inflection)
     
  2. Not_Punny

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    I dunno, Mem, the Brit groups over here sound English to me when they sing -- Killers, Keane, Radio Head, etc. etc. etc. (Not to mention oldies but goldies Beattles, Rolling Stones, Police, ELO, etc.)

    On the other hand, I can see where there CAN sometimes be confusion -- I dind't know Coldplay nor Oasis were Brits when I first heard them. :wink: And for the longest time I thought Eric Clapton was American!!
     
  3. Mem

    Mem
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    To me Radio Head, the Beatles and Rolling Stones sound Amercian when they sing.

    If you want to hear a bad fake British accent in music get "with Sympathy" by Ministry.
     
  4. chico8

    chico8 New Member

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    I've never heard anyone say such a thing! What an absurd claim.

    Have you ever been to England?
     
  5. drumstyck

    drumstyck New Member

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    just for reference, The Killers hail from Las Vegas, not Great Britain


    as for the main point, i do think that lots of British singers lose their accents when they sing...ive never really figured out why...i can listen to Zep all day and not really hear an accent...Elton John, Eric Clapton (as said)

    i think the main reason would be that for the typical american, we expect every british person to cut off their H's, turn Rs into Ds, etc...but as a singer, these people should be trained to not do that, so their singing voice turns into a more "american" sound...i guess? i dunno, just sorta kicking a theory around
     
  6. Mem

    Mem
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    YOU'RE MAD! (my favorite British expression, in "the states" mad mostly means angry)

    No I haven't. I have heard an aristocratic Englishman on TV who accent was almost entirely American.

    But English accents are obvious.

    I guess the British ear does not hear that most English singers sound American when they sing, or in denial about it, or offended by it.
     
  7. Principessa

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    :dunno: Maybe it's for the same reason that people who stutter (like Mel Tillis) don't do so when they sing. :dunno:
     
  8. Mem

    Mem
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    Stutterers also don't stutter when they read. They only stutter when they can't get their own thoughts out of their heads clearly.
     
  9. Not_Punny

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    OMG!!! You're right. I googled them years ago when I first heard "Hot Fuss", and the stuff I read was all about them coming over from England.

    I had NO IDEA that a band could go from Lost Wages (Las Vegas) all the way to England and back again!:biggrin1: Not only that, I used to play their CDs in my car and think to myself how very very English they sounded.... (blush)
     
  10. chico8

    chico8 New Member

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    Your ear must not be attuned to accents very well and I think you're trying to create an issue where none exists.

    There is something called a mid-Atlantic accent. I've heard a lot of east coasters pretending to be British; Anglophilia taken to extremes. But Brits rarely seem to affect an American accent unless they're mimicking Americans.

    Perhaps you'd better take a closer look at your prejudices and find out why you feel the way you do.
     
  11. B_horribleperson

    B_horribleperson New Member

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    have u heard people in england speak (dont get me started on the welsh and scottish) i want to stab myself in the ears
     
  12. dong20

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    I think you need your ears syringed. The Beatles, American accent.:rolleyes:
     
  13. Mem

    Mem
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    when spoken a Brit would say I want to hold your hond.

    When they sing it they pronounce the A in hand.
     
  14. dong20

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    Is that so? I don't recall heard a Brit say hond, unless they had a mouth full of hot tea perhaps. Neither do the Beatles in that song; listen closely it's haaAAand, extended, modulated but hard A's in some parts, short hard A's elsewhere.

    In case you're wondering, I have some experience of the Beatles, coming from their hometown, that's typical pronounciation there.:rolleyes:

    Seriously, Mem, Ears, syringed - SOON!
     
  15. Mem

    Mem
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    You con't hear it
    we say you can't hear it.
     
  16. dong20

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    That is so absurd, it's not worth the effort of starting a discussion, or perhaps it's just another one of your asinine theories on 'life according to Mem0101'?:rolleyes:
     
  17. Mem

    Mem
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    You're MAD, the Beatles are not from Rainland!:redface:
     
  18. chico8

    chico8 New Member

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    He's from Noy Joyyyysssseeee, he's probably been scarred for life so there's little hope I'm afraid......
     
  19. Mem

    Mem
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    Don't be so fearful. NOY?
     
  20. B_spiker067

    B_spiker067 New Member

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    So that they can be understood in English as is was meant to be spoken and heard.:biggrin1:

    That up and down inflection has its roots in native Amerindian languages. It is an accent like any you hear in English.
     
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