Women Gain in Education but Not Power

Discussion in 'Women's Issues' started by Principessa, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. Principessa

    Gold Member

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    Women Gain in Education but Not Power, Study Finds
    November 13, 2008
    By REUTERS

    GENEVA (Reuters) — Women still lag far behind men in top political and decision-making roles, though their access to education and health care is nearly equal, the World Economic Forum said Wednesday.

    In its 2008 Global Gender Gap report, the forum, a Swiss research organization, ranked Norway, Finland and Sweden as the countries that have the most equality of the sexes, and Saudi Arabia, Chad and Yemen as having the least.

    Using United Nations data, the report found that girls and women around the world had generally reached near-parity with their male peers in literacy, access to education and health and survival. But in terms of economics and politics, including relative access to executive government and corporate posts, the gap between the sexes remains large.

    The United States ranked 27th, above Russia (42nd), China (57th), Brazil (73rd) and India (113th). But the United States was ranked below Germany (11th), Britain (13th), France (15th), Lesotho (16th), Trinidad and Tobago (19th), South Africa (22nd), Argentina (24th) and Cuba (25th).

    “The world’s women are nearly as educated and as healthy as men, but are nowhere to be found in terms of decision-making,” said Saadia Zahidi of the World Economic Forum

    Middle Eastern and North African countries received the lowest ratings over all. The rankings of Syria, Qatar, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia declined in 2008.The report said the inequalities in those countries were so large as to put them at an economic disadvantage.

    “A nation’s competitiveness depends significantly on whether and how it educates and utilizes its female talent. To maximize its competitiveness and development potential, each country should strive for gender equality.”

     
  2. NEWREBA

    NEWREBA New Member

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    “A nation’s competitiveness depends significantly on whether and how it educates and utilizes its female talent. To maximize its competitiveness and development potential, each country should strive for gender equality.”


    It's interesting to me how many Islamic countries have the lowest rating. Doesn't anyone realize the connection of woman's rights and Islam?
     
  3. B_New End

    B_New End New Member

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    correlation =/= causation

    anyone realize the poorest nations adopt Islam?

    no education = islam
    islam = poverty
    no education = poverty

    Islam is not inherently anti-scientific. Some of the most brilliant minds in high physics come from Pakistan and Iran.
     
  4. D_Portelay Porquesword

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    Interesting post NJ.
     
  5. StraightCock4Her

    StraightCock4Her New Member

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    Poverty makes a person look for hope and religion is what most people tend to look for when they need hope.


    Sad world we live in when a person needs religion to make it through the day.
     
  6. Marlboro woman

    Marlboro woman New Member

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    I have female Muslim friends who will argue vehemently that Islam does not deny women's rights. I know many empowered Muslim women who have successful careers and find no contradiction between this and observing their faith.

    What holds Muslim women back in countries like Pakistan is culture, not religion.
     
  7. D_Chesty_Pecjiggle

    D_Chesty_Pecjiggle Account Disabled

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    I think this says to me that opportunities ARE available.

    How many of my female friends who were super smart in undergrad or super smart in grad school have quit jobs: Many.

    How many of my male friends: None.

    Many women still feel the draw of being a mom, raising a family, etc. Women's lib should and has given them the right to do whatever they want to do.

    But simple figures like these just look at averages which show far more men at the top -- because far more women leave the workforce of their own accord or decide they can't battle for top positions (and it takes a battle) and raise families.

    Plenty of men decide their quality of life is better working their job than battling to the top, but an even greater number of women make that decision. We all know that being good at our job alone is not enough to get ahead.
     
  8. B_Freedom of Speech

    B_Freedom of Speech New Member

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    Except for we black women. We have all the power.
     
  9. D_Fiona_Farvel

    D_Fiona_Farvel Account Disabled

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    This is true, however, not reflected in this data is, over the last 10 years, Saudi Arabia is actually educating more women in university than men. The women are also showing a greater diversity in their academic pursuits, from science to art. Whereas, since the era of Islamic revival, men have overwhelmingly pursued Koranic studies, which is not applicable to many careers.

    Ten years from now, I definitely see urban, upper class Saudi women coming to the fore. There are already indications of their growing power--even though disenfranchised, Saudi women have been elected to local councils and business guilds.

    Keep in mind, Saudi Arabia is the most conservative of the Gulf States, so the others already have women actively involved in the public sphere.
     
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