World’s most popular Bible to be revised

Discussion in 'Et Cetera, Et Cetera' started by Principessa, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. Principessa

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    19,494
    Likes Received:
    28
    Gender:
    Female
    World’s most popular Bible to be revised


    I didn't like all that gender change junk the first time around. :no: It doesn't make it any easier to understand. Heck, I'm a feminist and even I knew that no harm or malice was intended by mankind.

    I don't like it. :mad: I'd rather sit with the KJV and a dictionary than read that nonsense.
     
  2. Hotrocker

    Hotrocker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    851
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    358
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Georgia (US)
    Agreed! I'm a traditionalist, anyway. :p An old man at heart...
     
  3. D_Deceptivus Wrongpeter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    3
    Yawn. This is how colleges manage to screw money out of college kids... You take a text book, and every other year you change a few words, rearrange the problems at the end of the chapters and Voila - INSTANT obsolescence. All those books get thrown out, the publishers kill the second hand market, and we all get new books.
     
  4. B_cosmognosis

    B_cosmognosis New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Will this new version eliminate the murder, incest, sexism, racism, homophobia, rape, slavery and hypocrisy?
     
  5. Freddie53

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    7,285
    Likes Received:
    61
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The South, USA
    The world's most popular Bible???

    The publishers of that particular translation can't back that up with statistics. The venerable King James Version has sold a lot more copies than the NIV. I like the New International Version to read much of the time.

    But, there is no way that in a little over 20 years, this translation has sold more copies than the King James Version.

    Of course the publishers didn't say more copies sold. The publishers used the words most popular. The NIV is written in English. Most Christians world wide don't even read or speak English.

    I have a hard time believing that with two/thirds of world wide Christians being Roman Catholic that the NIV is even in the top three.

    Here is yet another advertisement that makes another misleading statement in the ad. It may not be a paid for ad, but guess who wrote the article? Hint: People who are paid to write articles for the company that translated the NIV.

    Again, the NIV is a great translation for study. I will always prefer the King James Version for the 23rd Psalm and the Christmas story as well as the beloved passage "In my Father's house are many mansions." I know that "dwelling places" is much more accurate to the original Greek. But when this passage is read publicly, I will always want to here the King James Version.

    For those who are not aware: Most of the Old Testament (the part before Jesus) is written in Hebrew or Aramaic. Most of the New Testament was written in the Greek spoken about 2000 years which is different from classical Greek and also different from modern Greek spoken in Greece today.

    All Bibles in English are versions that have been translated from Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek. Some are translated from Latin. Latin was translated from Greek.

    There are scores of English translations. While many believe that the King James Version is not as accurate as many of the new translations, it is the still the most venerable dating back to King James of England before the year 1700.

    Before this thread gets to far down the line. There are many things that are facts about the Bible. Facts can be proven to be true.

    Which translation is the most accurate to what the original Greek said is a matter of opinion or belief, not fact.

    Some of the original Greek words can be translated into so many different English words. It then becomes a matter of opinion which word is the most accurate for a paticular Greek word written down nearly 2000 years ago in a dialect of a language no longer spoken by people of today.
     
    #5 Freddie53, Sep 3, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2009
  6. D_Kissimmee Coldsore

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2007
    Messages:
    531
    Likes Received:
    0
    No, dude. God wanted it that way, aiight?
     
  7. prepstudinsc

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    8,613
    Likes Received:
    39
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Charlotte (NC, US)
    I like the NIV, it's the version I use. It's easy to understand and is pretty true to the original languages. However, all translations are just that--translations. Sometimes, meanings are lost in translation and it's good to compare to Greek and Hebrew scriptures for added clarity. We have to realize that things were watered down or slightly changed to make it more palatable for readers. When one compares against original texts, there is some stuff that would make most evangelicals faint.
     
  8. blg3floor3

    blg3floor3 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    AZ
    That's what I thought when I read that too. I saw the thread title and wondered "What are they doing to the King James Version?" Then I saw the article contents and it said NIV. I said, out loud, "What the FUCK?" Most popular by what definition of the word? Whatever they're smoking, my buddy at work would probably love some of it.
     
  9. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Messages:
    10,576
    Likes Received:
    25
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Warwick, NY, USA
    I'd love to see a Bible translated by a bunch of scholars who are, at most, deists: a complete re-translation from the oldest extant texts freshly examined and based upon the latest philological, archeological, historical, and anthropological knowledge. Each chapter and verse should have a concordance explaining what the original word was and colloquial phrases should be well-annotated. When necessary, an historical explanation should accompany.

    Imagine, a Bible without any other agenda beyond accuracy!
     
  10. D_Deceptivus Wrongpeter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    3
    Jason: try the New Jerusalem Bible. It was nominally prepared by Catholics so it pays lip service to the teachings of the Church. But don't worry, the book is a bald, joyless translation of the original texts, and the scholars that prepared it were so anxious to appear "scholarly", there isn't a whiff of faith in any of the supplementary material. It's positively the most Godless Bible I've ever come across.
     
  11. jason_els

    jason_els <img border="0" src="/images/badges/gold_member.gi

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Messages:
    10,576
    Likes Received:
    25
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Warwick, NY, USA
    Did they keep Joseph's coat, "of many colors," or did they succumb to the truth and make it, "a coat with sleeves?"

    How does it pay lip service to Catholicism? Do they have Jesus saying: "Holy Mary, mother of God, who gave birth to me while still a virgin, was born without original sin, and will assume bodily in heaven, behold your son. And you Peter, upon a rock over in Rome I will build my church and you will be the first pope. You are to wear funny hats and red shoes, sell indulgences, burn heretics, lead armies, and be sure to argue about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin?"
     
  12. Domisoldo

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4,079
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    May I add infanticide, genocide, belligerence?

    How about an addendum duly crediting the civilizations from which the various authors shamelessly plagiarized every one of the key stories?

     
  13. dongalong

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    5,336
    Likes Received:
    1,824
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Paris (FR)
    Truths and beliefs don't always mix!
     
  14. Calboner

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    Messages:
    9,026
    Albums:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2,465
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA
    The point that I found interesting is that the article refers to somebody named Moo. I had to find the original article (NJ supplied a faulty link) to find out that this is Douglas Moo, Professor at Wheaton College. Too bad that he doesn't teach at a cow college. MOOOO!
     
  15. B_bi_mmf

    B_bi_mmf New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    3,059
    Likes Received:
    20
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    U.S.
    I look forward to the day when most of the world will look at the Bible and just shake their heads is disbelief that large portions of a supposedly intelligent culture in the 21st century actually believed all that crap.
     
  16. D_Deceptivus Wrongpeter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    3
    Actually, that was a serious recommendation, but thank you for the facetious answer anyway. It made me smile.

    The translation tends to be literalist, so no risk of bumping into any of that "Bible as literature" nonsense. Full Disclosure Statement: I have this Bible, and I use it often, mostly when I need to see the "bald" text and "critical" commentary. The dirty pages mark the usual passages that get argued about most often.

    To answer your direct question: Joseph's coat "of many colors" is just a "decorated tunic". The translation is also scrupulously careful about retaining the gender ambiguities of Hebrew pronouns, especially in and around the Curse of the Serpent text in Genesis; Protestants tend to translate those pronouns as "he", interpreting the passages as prophesy that points to Christ, Catholics tend to favor "she" to advance Mariology, and Jews are left bewildered to wonder how you can read so much into a pronoun that's not even written on the page.

    However, since the Text was translated by fully indoctrinated lefties, you have to guess about "inclusive language" pronouns: where the translations reads "people" you are left to twist in the wind if the original text had a collective noun, or if the word originally read "men" and has been silently changed under the magic of "dynamic translation". (I wish the Moderns were as concerned to point out their own foibles as they are to prick at St. Jerome and the KJV).

    As for lip service: the translation has aspirations to be widely used as both a study Bible and a liturgical Bible (a translation suitable for public readings in Church), therefore it has to go along with all the basic tenets, but is careful to hold them at arm's length.

    In my mind, what condems the New Jerusalem Translation, are odd, patently hostile footnotes that pop up in which the translators bias against the text is obvious.

    "Luke 1:46: And Mary said: My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord..", (for non-Bible readers, the text is a short but famous prayer praising God.)
    The text is followed by a speculative footnote where this prayer came from. In my mind there are two reasonable explanations:

    1. The Religious explanation: The spirit of God came upon Mary and out came the prayer.
    2. A more Secular answer: The prayer is assembled from Old Testament tropes and scriptural quotations that any religious Jew of the time would be familiar with.
    Either answer is acceptable. The problem is, without showing any evidence and conclusions based on consecutive speculations, the translators conclude that a Jewish girl could not have said this prayer, that the prayer was discovered by the original text author (traditionally Luke), and inserted into the original text, using Mary as a literary puppet.
    "...Luke must have found this canticle in the circles of the "Poor", where it was perhaps attributed to the Daughter of Zion. He found it suitable to bring into his prose narrative and put on the lips of Mary."

    The complaint about traditional Bible translations is that they are driven by dogma, however the new translations only seem to have swapped the dogma out for agenda and marketing, and what was once a life time of work is now turned into a desk-top publishing hobby.
     
  17. Calboner

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    Messages:
    9,026
    Albums:
    5
    Likes Received:
    2,465
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    USA
    An observation about Bible translations: Many editions of the King James translation indicate which words or phrases are translators' interpolations by setting them in italics. Unfortunately, some people, presumably ignorant of the function of the italics, include them when they quote from the text. In consequence, you get quotations with what seem to be ridiculously inappropriate emphases inserted into them, like this one, which I saw in the epigraph of a book: "For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off" (Deuteronomy 30:11). Oh it isn't, is it? :laughing:
     
  18. Domisoldo

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4,079
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    23
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest

    Oscar Wilde defined religion with his characteristic brio:

    An opinion that has survived.

    For the rational mind, there are some explanations for this baffling phenomenon:

    - 85% of adults maintain the religion of their parents. That figure speaks volume about early indoctrination and lack of independent selection.

    - Because "the" Bible is a loose collection of disparate books, arbitrarily "canonized" by a group of flat-Earth-type men many generations after the death of Jesus, and because it suffered through so many translations and transcriptions, it supremely lends itself to a wide range of contradictory interpretations, a perfect recipe for perennial success.


     
  19. D_CountdeGrandePinja

    D_CountdeGrandePinja Account Disabled

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    9,770
    Likes Received:
    42
    If you want to read the BEST out there - The Inclusive Bible! Check it out.
     
  20. D_Deceptivus Wrongpeter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    3
    The last movie biography didn't mention it (wrong target audience I guess), but did you know that at the end of his life, Oscar became a Catholic, confessed, received last rights and is now (most likely) a saint in heaven?

    St. Oscar the Divine. I like the sound of that. I'm gonna call Pope Joe and get some churches built.



    Wearing the mask of Dorian Gray, he wrote:
    It was rumoured of him once that he was about to join the Roman Catholic communion, and certainly the Roman ritual had always a great attraction for him. The daily sacrifice, more awful really than all the sacrifices of the antique world, stirred him as much by its superb rejection of the evidence of the senses as by the primitive simplicity of its elements and the eternal pathos of the human tragedy that it sought to symbolize.
    He loved to kneel down on the cold marble pavement and watch the priest, in his stiff flowered dalmatic, slowly and with white hands moving aside the veil of the tabernacle, or raising aloft the jewelled, lantern-shaped monstrance with that pallid wafer that at times, one would fain think, is indeed the "panis caelestis," the bread of angels, or, robed in the garments of the Passion of Christ, breaking the Host into the chalice and smiting his breast for his sins.
    The fuming censers that the grave boys, in their lace and scarlet, tossed into the air like great gilt flowers had their subtle fascination for him. As he passed out, he used to look with wonder at the black confessionals and long to sit in the dim shadow of one of them and listen to men and women whispering through the worn grating the true story of their lives.
     
Draft saved Draft deleted